School of Medicine


Showing 1-3 of 3 Results

  • Francisco De La Vega

    Francisco De La Vega

    Adjunct Professor, Biomedical Data Science-Administration

    BioProf. Francisco M. De La Vega is a geneticist and computational biologist with interests in cancer, population, and clinical genomics, and with extensive experience in the life sciences industry. He is a Distinguished Scientific Fellow and Vice President of Bioinformatics and at TOMA Biosciences, a privately held start-up company commercializing a technology for precision oncology derived from inventions at Stanford. Francisco is also Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biomedical Data science of the Stanford School of Medicine, a Director of the International Society of Computational Biology, and is or has been a member of the Steering Committee of the NIST-led Genome-in-a-Bottle consortium, the PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes project of the ICGC, and the Steering Committee of the 1000 Genomes Project. He has more recently contributed to start-up companies in the life sciences area in positions such as CSO (Annai Systems) and VP of Genomics (Real Time Genetics, Omicia). Previously, he spent over 13 yeas at Applied Biosystems (later Life Technologies and currently Thermo-Fisher), where he played a pivotal role in the development of several successful genetic analysis technologies. For this, he was inducted in 2009 to the Innovation & Invention Society of Life Technologies, a program that recognized the company’s most elite inventors, and in 2008 was a co-recipient of the Bio-IT World Best Practices Award in Basic Research.

  • Manisha Desai

    Manisha Desai

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (BMIR), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Desai is the Director of the Quantitative Sciences Unit. She is interested in the application of biostatistical methods to all areas of medicine including oncology, nephrology, and endocrinology. She works on methods for the analysis of epidemiologic studies, clinical trials, and studies with missing observations.