School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 48 Results

  • Gary Dahl

    Gary Dahl

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for childhood cancer, overcoming multidrug resistance in leukemia and solid tumors, biology and treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, early detection of central nervous system leukemia by measuring growth, factor binding proteins.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)
    On Partial Leave from 07/01/2024 To 06/30/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Mihaela Damian MD

    Mihaela Damian MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Pharmacology
    Sedation
    Solid Organ Transplantation

  • Roxana Daneshjou, MD, PhD

    Roxana Daneshjou, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Dermatology

    BioDr. Daneshjou studied Bioengineering at Rice University before matriculating to Stanford School of Medicine where she completed her MD and a PhD in Genetics with Dr. Russ Altman as part of the medical scientist training program. She completed dermatology residency at Stanford as part of the research track and completed a postdoc in Biomedical Data Science with Dr. James Zou. She currently is the assistant director of the Center of Excellence for Precision Heath & Pharmacogenomics, director of informatics for the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG), a founding member of the Translational AI in Dermatology (TRAIND) group, and a faculty affiliate of Human-centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) and the AI in Medicine and Imaging (AIMI) centers.

  • Rebecca Dang

    Rebecca Dang

    Instructor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Rebecca Dang is an Instructor in the Division of General Pediatrics at Stanford University. She earned her medical degree at Georgetown School of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. She also completed pediatric hospital medicine fellowship and a master’s program in clinical research and epidemiology at Stanford University. Dr. Dang provides clinical care for children on the pediatric ward and newborn nursery.

    Dr. Dang’s research interest focuses on high-value pediatric care, which she hopes to improve through building evidence for common, understudied practices. Common practices that are ubiquitous throughout pediatric medicine are temperature measurement and management. Despite temperature measurement and the subsequent detection of ‘normal’ or ‘abnormal’ values driving clinical decision making, these temperature thresholds may be outdated or poorly defined. Dr. Dang has led many projects on temperature-related topics, including routine temperature measurement at well-child visits, pediatric temperature percentiles, risk factors for and outcomes of neonatal hypothermia in the newborn nursery, and newborn temperature norms. This work has led to first-author publications in the high-impact journals of Academic Pediatrics, Pediatrics, Journal of Pediatrics, JAMA Network Open, and Hospital Pediatrics. She has secured continual institutional and foundation funding, including a Maternal & Child Health Research Institute clinical trainee award and master’s tuition program, Gerber Foundation main and novice research award, the Department of Pediatrics’ Bridge-to-K Program, and the PEDSnet Scholars Program.

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    On Partial Leave from 07/01/2024 To 08/19/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have extensive experience in the development of global health innovations and in working to test and scale-up health interventions. At Stanford University, I am playing a leading role in developing global women and children’s health research and educational programs, including the establishment of a Global Center for Gender Equality at Stanford University. My research focuses on advancing child health and development in low resource settings and advancing gender equality and health globally, and includes several applications of artificial intelligence. Before joining Stanford, I was Senior Fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I led the development of initiatives to address gender inequalities and empower women and girls. Prior to this role, I served as the BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across maternal, newborn and child health, nutrition, and family planning. In this role, I was responsible for investments ranging from scientific discovery to intervention development and delivery of interventions at scale. I worked closely with the Discovery team to shape discovery and development investments and was a co-founder of the Saving Lives at Birth Development Grand Challenge, the Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development Grand Challenge, and the Healthy Birth, Growth and Development initiative. Based on these experiences, I understand how to identify knowledge gaps and generate evidence of impact for new interventions, and how to utilize evidence to influence the policy dialogue leading to programmatic adoption and scale-up of interventions in low income settings. As Director of Family Health, I also co-led the development and implementation of the BMGF global health strategy for India, which cuts across multiple health and development sectors. Before joining BMGF, I was Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I led the development of newborn health research, including numerous facility- and community-based maternal and child health research trials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, I was Senior Research Advisor for the $50M Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where I led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival.