School of Medicine


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  • Aaron J. Dawes, MD, PhD

    Aaron J. Dawes, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    BioDr. Dawes is a board-certified, fellowship-trained colon and rectal surgeon. He is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Dawes treats a wide variety of conditions involving the colon, rectum, and anus, always leveraging the latest evidence and technologies. He is fully trained in minimally invasive surgical techniques--including laparoscopic, robotic, and trans-anal minimally invasive surgery--and strives to employ them, whenever possible, in an effort to reduce pain and shorten recovery.

    In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Dawes is a health services researcher, receiving his Ph.D. in Health Policy and Management from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. His research focuses on policy development, measurement, and evaluation for patients with colorectal conditions. He is particularly interested in using data to drive policy interventions aimed at reducing disparities in quality, access, and value.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Dr. Dawes completed a residency in General Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles followed by a fellowship in Colon and Rectal Surgery at the University of Minnesota. He has authored articles in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Cancer, Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Health Services Research, and JAMA Surgery. His work has also been featured in the Los Angeles Times, the Daily Press, and HealthDay News.

    A native of the San Francisco Bay Area, Dr. Dawes received his A.B. in Public and International Affairs from Princeton University and his M.D. from Vanderbilt University.

  • Daniel James Delitto, MD, PhD

    Daniel James Delitto, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    BioDr. Delitto is a fellowship-trained surgical oncologist with a focus on conditions of the liver, pancreas, and stomach. He is an assistant professor in Stanford Medicine’s Department of Surgery.

    His education includes a decade of postgraduate training in complex general surgical oncology, as well as a PhD in immunology with an emphasis on cancer biology. He completed a clinical fellowship at Johns Hopkins University and continued his research at the postdoctoral level in the laboratory of Dr. Elizabeth Jaffee. His research focus is on advancing the field of cancer immunology and harnessing his findings to improve immunotherapies.

    He was the principal investigator of two studies examining the immune response to pancreatic cancer, including one funded by the National Cancer Institute.

    Dr. Delitto has presented the findings of his research at conferences such as the American Association for Cancer Research, Society for the Immunotherapy of Cancer, American Association of Immunologists, American College of Surgeons, Academic Surgical Congress and Pancreas Club. In addition to cancer immunology, he has also presented work focused on cancer cachexia, surgical outcomes, translational experimental models and a variety of other oncologic topics.

    He has published original work in Nature Communications, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, and other high impact journals. He is also a reviewer for Annals of Surgery, Scientific Reports, Surgery, Tumor Biology, Journal of Surgical Research, PLOS ONE, and the Journal of Translational Medicine.

    Dr. Delitto has earned numerous honors related to clinical excellence, teaching and research. He is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and a member of the Society of Surgical Oncology, American Association for Cancer Research and American Association of Immunologists.

  • Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are focused on minimizing the impact of breast cancer from a diagnostic and therapuetic standpoint. Breast MRI is a powerful tool to facilitate the screening for and staging of breast cancer, and can be valuable adjunct to guide breast surgery. Oncoplastic surgical techniques optimize cosmesis after breast cancer surgery. Accelerated radiotherapy after lumpectomy decreases radiotherapy treatment times from 6 weeks to just 1 to 5 days.

  • Monica M. Dua, MD

    Monica M. Dua, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTechnical aspects of minimally invasive pancreatic and liver surgery
    Minimally invasive strategies for the management of pancreatic necrosis
    Management of severe acute pancreatitis – academic vs community treatment
    Multidisciplinary treatment of HCC; institutional barriers to appropriate referral/ care
    Endocrine/exocrine insufficiency after pancreatectomy; volumetric assessment
    Natural history and management of pancreatic cysts