School of Medicine


Showing 321-340 of 345 Results

  • Janene Fuerch

    Janene Fuerch

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioClinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics; Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine.

    Experienced Pediatrician/Neonatologist with training as a Stanford Biodesign Innovation Fellow leading medtech innovation in neonatology, pediatrics and women's health. Research interests also include: neonatal resuscitation, simulation, human factors, information data displays.

  • Michael Fujinaka

    Michael Fujinaka

    Clinical Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Fujinaka studied Economics and Molecular Biology at Claremont McKenna College. He received his Medical Doctorate (M.D.) from the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Fujinaka completed his Internal Medicine Internship at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. He then Specialized in Anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego. Finally, he completed Sub-Specialty training in Pain Medicine at Stanford University. While at Stanford, the Faculty selected him to be Chief of his Fellowship class. He joined as full-time Faculty with Stanford Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology in 2016.

  • Eri Fukaya

    Eri Fukaya

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioDr. Fukaya practices Vascular Medicine at the Stanford Vascular Clinics and Advanced Wound Care Center. She received her medical education in Tokyo and completed her medical training both in the US and Japan. She joined Stanford in 2015.

    Vascular Medicine covers a wide range of vascular disorders including chronic venous insufficiency, varicose veins, deep vein thrombosis, post thrombotic syndrome, peripheral artery disease, carotid artery disease, cardiovascular risk evaluation, fibromuscular dysplasia, rare vascular disease, lymphedema, arterial/venous/diabetic ulcers, and wound care.

    Dr. Fukaya has a special interest in venous disease and started the Stanford Vascular and Vein Clinic in 2016.

    Board Certified in Vascular Medicine
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine (Japan)
    Board Certified in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Japan)

  • Shivali Fulchand

    Shivali Fulchand

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Dermatology

    BioShivali started her role as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Stanford University Department of Dermatology in September 2020. She grew up in Leicestershire, England. She graduated from Cardiff University School of Medicine in 2017, and has a BSc (Honors) in Medical Genetics. Following graduation, she completed a two-year academic internship programme with the University Hospitals of Leicester, England. Following selection for a national medical leadership fellowship, Shivali worked as an Editor at The BMJ from 2019-20. One of her key roles was leading climate change content and activity within the journal. She led the publication of a series of articles highlighting the importance of climate change on health and healthcare, attended and reported on key health and climate events and organised a national webinar on health and climate change. She also edited education articles and wrote and published covid-19 guideline summaries. Whilst at medical school, she co-founded The British Student Doctor Journal, a novel peer-reviewed journal to educate and train medical students in editorial work, peer review and publishing. The journal is a publication of The Foundation for Medical Publishing, and Shivali now serves as an Executive Director and Trustee of this organisation. She has interests in publication and research ethics and global health.

  • Gerald Fuller

    Gerald Fuller

    Fletcher Jones II Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioThe processing of complex liquids (polymers, suspensions, emulsions, biological fluids) alters their microstructure through orientation and deformation of their constitutive elements. In the case of polymeric liquids, it is of interest to obtain in situ measurements of segmental orientation and optical methods have proven to be an excellent means of acquiring this information. Research in our laboratory has resulted in a number of techniques in optical rheometry such as high-speed polarimetry (birefringence and dichroism) and various microscopy methods (fluorescence, phase contrast, and atomic force microscopy).

    The microstructure of polymeric and other complex materials also cause them to have interesting physical properties and respond to different flow conditions in unusual manners. In our laboratory, we are equipped with instruments that are able to characterize these materials such as shear rheometer, capillary break up extensional rheometer, and 2D extensional rheometer. Then, the response of these materials to different flow conditions can be visualized and analyzed in detail using high speed imaging devices at up to 2,000 frames per second.

    There are numerous processes encountered in nature and industry where the deformation of fluid-fluid interfaces is of central importance. Examples from nature include deformation of the red blood cell in small capillaries, cell division and structure and composition of the tear film. Industrial applications include the processing of emulsions and foams, and the atomization of droplets in ink-jet printing. In our laboratory, fundamental research is in progress to understand the orientation and deformation of monolayers at the molecular level. These experiments employ state of the art optical methods such as polarization modulated dichroism, fluorescence microscopy, and Brewster angle microscopy to obtain in situ measurements of polymer films and small molecule amphiphile monolayers subject to flow. Langmuir troughs are used as the experimental platform so that the thermodynamic state of the monolayers can be systematically controlled. For the first time, well characterized, homogeneous surface flows have been developed, and real time measurements of molecular and microdomain orientation have been obtained. These microstructural experiments are complemented by measurements of the macroscopic, mechanical properties of the films.

  • Margaret T. Fuller

    Margaret T. Fuller

    Reed-Hodgson Professor in Human Biology and Professor of Genetics and of Obstetrics/Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulation of self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation in adult stem cell lineages. Developmental tumor suppressor mechanisms and regulation of the switch from proliferation to differentiation. Cell type specific transcription machinery and regulation of cell differentiation. Developmental regulation of cell cycle progression during male meiosis.

  • Becky Fullmer

    Becky Fullmer

    Administrative Associate 3, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Current Role at StanfordBecky provides administrative support to Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez and the Rodriguez Lab within the School of Medicine's Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Department.

  • Connie Fung

    Connie Fung

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    BioConnie received her B.S. in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics from UCLA, where she conducted research on how the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii invades and replicates inside host cells in the lab of Dr. Peter Bradley. Subsequently, she obtained her Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from Stanford University with Dr. Manuel Amieva. Her thesis research involved the use of high-resolution microscopy to study how the bacterium Helicobacter pylori establishes and maintains persistent colonization of the gastric epithelium. Connie joined Dr. Michael Howitt's lab as a postdoctoral research fellow in 2019 and is currently investigating how tuft cells, specialized taste-chemosensory cells, modulate mucosal immunity in response to intestinal parasites.

  • Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lawrence Fung is a scientist and psychiatrist specialized in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the father of a neurodiverse teenager with ASD. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, which strives to uncover the strengths of neurodiverse individuals and utilize their talents to increase innovation and productivity of the society as a whole. He directs the Neurodiverse Student Support Program, Neurodiversity at Work Program (recently funded by Autism Speaks), and Adult Neurodevelopment Clinic at Stanford. Dr. Fung is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His lab advances the understanding of neural bases of human socio-communicative and cognitive functions by using novel neuroimaging and technologies. His team devise and implement novel interventions to improve the lives of neurodiverse individuals by maximizing their potential and productivity. For example, he is conducting a study to demonstrate that specialized employment programs such as Neurodiversity at Work program will result in higher retention rates and quality of life.