School of Medicine


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  • William Giardino

    William Giardino

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Giardino Laboratory: our group aims to decipher the neural mechanisms underlying psychiatric conditions of stress, addiction, and sleep disturbances. Our work uses combinatorial technologies for precisely mapping, monitoring, and manipulating neural circuits that drive hedonic and homeostatic states. Projects in the lab are funded by the NIH Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the Stanford Center for Women's Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM).

  • Erin Gibson

    Erin Gibson

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlia make up more than half of the cells in the human brain, but we are just beginning to understand the complex and multifactorial role glia play in health and disease. Glia are decidedly dynamic in form and function. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this dynamic nature of glia is imperative to developing novel therapeutic strategies for diseases of the nervous system that involve aberrant gliogenesis, especially related to changes in myelination.

  • Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

    Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    BioDr. Goldstein-Piekarski directs the Computational Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Sleep Laboratory (CoPsyN Sleep Lab) as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine and PI within the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) at the Palo Alto VA. She received her PhD in 2014 at the University of California, Berkeley where she studied the consequences of sleep on emotional brain function. She then completed a Postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford focusing on understanding the brain basis of anxiety and depression.

    As the director of the CoPsyN Sleep Lab she is developing a translational, interdisciplinary research program that combines human neuroimaging, high-density EEG sleep recording, and computational modeling to understand the neural mechanisms through which sleep disruption contributes to affective disorders, particularly depression, across the lifespan. The ultimate goals of this research are to (1) develop mechanistically-informed interventions that directly target aspects of sleep and brain function to prevent and treat affective disorders and (2) identify novel biomarkers which can identify which individuals are most likely to experience improved mood following targeted sleep interventions.

    This work is currently supported by The KLS Foundation, a R01 from National Institute of Mental Health, and a R61 from the National Institute of Mental Health.