School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 35 Results

  • Laura Michele Hack

    Laura Michele Hack

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Laura Hack is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Director of Novel & Precision Neurotherapeutics at the Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness, Director of the Stanford Translational Precision Mental Health Clinic, and Deputy Director of the Precision Neuromodulation Clinic (PNC) within the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Dr. Hack's translational research program focuses on identifying bioclinical subtypes of depression and testing mechanistically-guided treatments for these subtypes. Dr. Hack studies treatments spanning repurposed medications, such as pramipexole and guanfacine, neuromodulation techniques, ketamine, MDMA, and psilocybin. Clinically, she specializes in delivering novel treatments, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and ketamine, to patients suffering from treatment-resistant depression and comorbid trauma-related disorders.

  • Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary area of scholarly and clinical interest is the pathogenesis of problem behaviors shown by individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), particularly those with neurogenetic forms of IDD, such as fragile X syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. My work aims to both advance understanding of these disorders and to identify effective new treatment approaches for pediatric and adult patient populations by state-of-the-art methodologies, such as brain imaging, eye tracking and functional analysis to determine how environmental and biological factors affect the development of aberrant behaviors in these syndromes. The end goal of my research is to create patient-specific methods for treating the symptoms of these disorders.

  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrincipal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Marron and Mary Elizabeth Kendrick Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focuses on developmental, cognitive and psychosocial factors involved in adolescents’ and young adults’ health-related decision-making, perceptions of risk and vulnerability, health communication and risk behavior. My research has focused on understanding and reducing health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, alcohol and marijuana use, risky driving, and risky sexual behavior.

  • Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe neurobiology of autism
    Neuroimaging in individuals with autism
    Psychopharmacological treatment of children and adults with autism and/or developmental disorders
    The neurobiology and innovative interventions of several neurogenic disorders including DiGeorge Syndrome (Velocardiofacial syndrome; 22q11.2 mutations), PTEN mutations, and Phelan McDermid Syndrome (22q13 mutations).

  • Kate Hardy

    Kate Hardy

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKate Hardy is a California Licensed Psychologist who has specialized in working with individuals with psychosis for over 15 years in both research and clinical settings. Dr. Hardy received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. She has worked in specialist early psychosis services in both the UK and the US, including UCSF’s Prodrome Assessment Research and Treatment (PART) program, where she completed her post-doctoral fellowship, and as Clinical Director for the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program. Dr. Hardy has significant experience in providing CBTp to individuals with early psychosis, and those at risk of developing psychosis, in both individual and group settings and integration of this clinical intervention to broader systems and staff teams. She has led multiple trainings and workshops in CBTp to a wide variety of audiences including community clinicians, psychiatrists, and families, and provides ongoing supervision and consultation in this approach. Dr. Hardy is also involved in the implementation of national strategies to increase dissemination of early psychosis models with the aim of bringing these cutting edge treatments to a broader population.

  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioNancy A. Haug, PhD is Adjunct Clinical Professor and Addiction Medicine fellowship program faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently leads didactics and a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows, and teaches a postdoctoral seminar on ethics and legal issues for the Clinical Psychology Fellowship Program. Dr. Haug's primary academic affiliation is Professor of Psychology at Palo Alto University, where she teaches, advises and supervises doctoral students in the PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium. Dr. Haug previously served as faculty and attending psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Francisco, and taught in the University of California, Berkeley Alcohol & Drug Studies program. She obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a Master's degree in Counseling Psychology at Loyola University, Maryland. She completed a clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at University of California, San Francisco and San Francisco General Hospital in public service and minority mental health.

    Dr. Haug is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethics Committee and formerly served as a member of the California Psychological Association Ethics Committee. She is a Fellow and Member-at-Large for Practice in the Society of Addiction Psychology (APA, Division 50). Dr. Haug is on the editorial board of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs and the Journal of Addictive Diseases. She was funded by SAMHSA for a practitioner-education initiative to expand training for evidence-based addiction treatment. Dr. Haug leads the Harm Reduction and Addiction Treatment Laboratory at PAU with current research studies on the implementation of evidence-based practices in addiction treatment, harm reduction for substance use, cannabis vaping and psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.

    Dr. Haug has been licensed as a psychologist in California since 2004, is board certified in addiction psychology by American Board of Professional Psychology, and has an independent practice in Los Gatos, CA. She has clinical expertise in treating substance misuse and eating disorders using motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based therapies including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Dr. Haug is a Stanford WellConnect referral for fellows, residents and faculty in her clinical practice. She recently completed the Stanford YogaX 200-Hour Yoga Teacher Training Program with healthcare setting emphasis.

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI am a neuroscientist and Principal Investigator of the Stanford Clinical Neuroscience (CNS) Lab in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences as well as Director of Neuroimaging for the Autism and Developmental Disorders Research Program at Stanford. My innovative research studies clinical aspects of cognitive and behavioral neuroscience, with a special focus on examining the neural circuitry associated with important brain-behavior relationships that may underlie different psychological and psychiatric domains in autistic children, adolescents, and adults. The ultimate goal of this research is to improve our understanding of the development of different cognitive and behavioral skills in order to develop mechanistically driven interventions that will improve precision medicine for mental health. Biologically based diagnosis and treatment are extremely limited for most psychological and psychiatric conditions but also critically needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes, especially for neurodevelopmental disorders in which early intervention is the most beneficial. My early career research has primarily focused on clinical neuroscience using neuroimaging (e.g., MRI & EEG) to examine the effects of different drugs and behavioral interventions on the brain, especially for developing biomarkers for improving treatment planning and monitoring biological changes in response to single dose and clinical trials.

    My primary contributions to science thus far fall within these major categories: 1) identifying the neural correlates of individual differences in cognition and behavior, 2) developing new interventions and investigating the neurobiological substrates of response to treatment, 3) examining different factors that contribute to brain development, 4) summarizing and increasing accessibility to autism-related research, and 5) methods development for neuroimaging studies. My earliest research investigated the neurobiology of alexithymia, dyslexia, and stress using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging to test theories of the mechanisms that contribute to differences in cognition and behavior. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on neurodevelopmental disorders, examined the neural correlates of response to beta-blockers in autistic adults and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to the autism phenotype. During my postdoctoral training, I have developed further skills for working with children in multiple clinical research settings, especially for using advanced neuroimaging approaches to examine important brain-behavior relationships. This includes a recent K99/R00 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NCT04278898 & NCT05664789) that will assess the neurobiology of restricted and repetitive behaviors in autistic children and examine the efficacy and target engagement of a novel nutritional supplement and investigational drug, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in the brain. You can find more information about our NAC studies at https://redcap.link/NACandAutism.