School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 62 Results

  • Jen Haensel

    Jen Haensel

    Basic Life Research Scientist, Ophthalmology Research/Clinical Trials

    BioI am a Research Scientist in the Roberts Vision Development & Oculomotor Lab at Stanford University’s Department of Ophthalmology, working at the intersection of vision science, neuroscience, and experimental psychology. My current research uses eye-tracking, photorefraction, and psychophysics to study oculomotor development and visual function in amblyopia, strabismus, and concussion. I also work on developing methodology to record accommodative measurements and gaze behaviour in dynamic, naturalistic settings.

    I completed my PhD in Experimental Psychology at Birkbeck, University of London (UK), where I used advanced eye-tracking techniques to study the influence of postnatal experience on social gaze behaviour. Prior to joining Stanford, I also worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bath (UK), developing empirical human-robot interaction studies to inform the ethical design of humanoid robots.

  • Bereketeab Haileselassie

    Bereketeab Haileselassie

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory is focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms which mediate end-organ failure in pediatric sepsis. Our current work focuses on determining the role of altered mitochondrial dynamics in sepsis-induced multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Specifically, we focus on understanding the mechanisms that mediate derangements in mitochondrial fission and autophagy in sepsis.

  • Jens Hainmueller

    Jens Hainmueller

    Kimberly Glenn Professor and Professor of Political Science

    BioJens Hainmueller is the Kimberly Glenn Professor in Political Science and Director of Graduate Studies of the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is the Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford Immigration Policy Lab that is focused on the design and evaluation of immigration and integration policies and programs.

    His research interests include statistical methods, causal inference, immigration, and political economy. He has published over 65 articles, many of them in top general science journals (e.g. Science, Nature, PNAS) and top field journals in political science, statistics, economics, and business. His statistical methods are used by organizations to conduct causal inferences in various settings. He has also published multiple open source software packages. His research has received funding from organizations such as Schmidt Futures, the Robin Hood Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research has won various awards including the Gosnell Prize for Excellence in Political Methodology, the Warren Miller Prize, the Robert H. Durr award, and the Emerging Scholar award by the Society of Political Methodology. He was selected as an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and inducted as a Fellow of the Society of Political Methodology. He has received an honorary degree from the European University Institute (EUI).

    Hainmueller received his PhD from Harvard University and also studied at the London School of Economics, Brown University, and the University of Tübingen. Before joining Stanford, he served on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • Lou Halamek

    Lou Halamek

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. development of hospital operations centers coupled with sophisticated simulation capabilities
    2. re-creation of near misses and adverse events
    3. optimizing human and system performance during resuscitation
    4. optimizing pattern recognition and situational awareness at the bedside
    5. evaluation and optimization of debriefing
    6. patient simulator design

  • Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary area of scholarly and clinical interest is the pathogenesis of problem behaviors shown by individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), particularly those with neurogenetic forms of IDD, such as fragile X syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. My work aims to both advance understanding of these disorders and to identify effective new treatment approaches for pediatric and adult patient populations by state-of-the-art methodologies, such as brain imaging, eye tracking and functional analysis to determine how environmental and biological factors affect the development of aberrant behaviors in these syndromes. The end goal of my research is to create patient-specific methods for treating the symptoms of these disorders.

  • Meghan Halley

    Meghan Halley

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics)

    BioMeghan Halley, PhD, MPH, (she/hers) is an Assistant Professor at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics. A medical anthropoloigst by training, Dr. Halley's research focuses on ethical challenges in research and clinical care for patients with rare and undiagnosed genetic conditions.

  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrincipal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Marron and Mary Elizabeth Kendrick Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focuses on developmental, cognitive and psychosocial factors involved in adolescents’ and young adults’ health-related decision-making, perceptions of risk and vulnerability, health communication and risk behavior. My research has focused on understanding and reducing health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, alcohol and marijuana use, risky driving, and risky sexual behavior.