School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 39 Results

  • Neil M. Kalwani

    Neil M. Kalwani

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioNeil Kalwani, MD, MPP is a Clinical Scholar in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and a postdoctoral fellow in the Stanford-AHRQ Health Services Research Training Program in the Department of Health Policy. He attended college at Yale University and completed graduate degrees in medicine and public policy at Harvard University. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital before arriving at Stanford in 2018 for fellowship in cardiovascular medicine, during which he served as Chief Fellow. He is now completing advanced training in echocardiography.

    Dr. Kalwani's research focuses on the evaluation of policies and care delivery innovations designed to improve the value of care for patients with cardiovascular disease.

  • Peter Kao

    Peter Kao

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program has several active projects:
    1.) Pulmonary Vascular Disease – Simvastatin reversed experimental pulmonary hypertension, and is safe for treatment of patients. Blinded clinical trials of efficacy are in progress.
    2.) Lung inflammation and regeneration (stem cells)
    3.) Lung surfactant rheology and oxidative stress
    4.) Gene regulation by RNA binding proteins, NF45 and NF90 through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Reinhard Family Professor, Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Ioannis Karakikes

    Ioannis Karakikes

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Karakikes Lab aims to uncover fundamental new insights into the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of pathogenic mutations associated with familial cardiovascular diseases.

  • Daniel Katz

    Daniel Katz

    Instructor, Medicine

    BioDr. Katz is board certified in both cardiovascular medicine and internal medicine. He received fellowship training in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology. He is an instructor of medicine in the Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division.

    He provides innovative care to patients with advanced heart failure, cardiac transplantation, or mechanical circulatory support. He sees outpatients at the Advanced Heart Failure Clinic in Pleasanton.

    Dr. Katz has conducted extensive clinical and scientific research. Sponsors include the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    His research focuses on understanding the complex syndrome of heart failure using genetic, proteomic, and metabolomic data from a diverse array of patients and healthy adults. The work aims to offer patients better treatments for their unique form of heart failure.

    Dr. Katz has authored articles on his research findings for peer-reviewed journals such as New England Journal of Medicine, Circulation, and many more. He also has co-authored textbook chapters on cardiovascular genetics and genomics, ischemic heart disease, and mechanical circulatory support.

    He reviews articles for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, and Scientific Reports. He has made invited presentations to his peers on subjects including the use of proteome profiling in the analysis of heart failure.

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor of Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.