School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 19 Results

  • Neil M. Kalwani

    Neil M. Kalwani

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioNeil Kalwani, MD, MPP is a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. He attended college at Yale University and completed graduate degrees in medicine and public policy at Harvard University. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital before arriving at Stanford in 2018 for fellowship in cardiovascular medicine, during which he served as Chief Fellow. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship through the Stanford-AHRQ Health Services Research Training Program in the Department of Health Policy. His clinical focus is in general and preventive cardiology and echocardiography. He practices at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System and at Stanford Health Care.

    Dr. Kalwani's research focuses on the evaluation of policies and care delivery innovations designed to improve the value of care for patients with cardiovascular disease.

  • Guson Kang

    Guson Kang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Kang is an interventional cardiologist who specializes in the treatment of structural heart disease. He has expertise in complex coronary interventions, transcatheter aortic and mitral valve replacements, transcatheter mitral valve repair, left atrial appendage occlusion, PFO/septal defect closure, alcohol septal ablation, and paravalvular leak closure.

    A Bay Area native, he graduated from Stanford University and obtained his medical degree at Yale University. He came back to Stanford to train in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology before completing an advanced structural interventions fellowship at Ford Hospital.

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Reinhard Family Professor, Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Daniel Katz

    Daniel Katz

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDaniel Katz is an Instructor of Medicine and an Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiologist. He completed internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, general cardiology training at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and then joined Stanford in 2021 for his advanced heart failure training. Since medical school, his research has focused on identifying the various pathophysiologic patterns and mechanisms that lead to the heterogeneous syndrome of heart failure. His efforts leverage high dimensional data in many forms including clinical phenotypes, plasma proteomics, metabolomics, and genetics. He is presently engaged in analysis of multi-omic data from the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC) and the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program. His clinical interests include advanced heart failure, transplant cardiology, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Kawana joined the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed a postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in the Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in the clinic and attends CCU/heart failure service, and post-heart transplant and MCS service. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approaches, which would lead to the development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein. He is involved in multiple clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in inherited cardiomyopathy and also conducting a device study in heart failure.

  • Abha Khandelwal

    Abha Khandelwal

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular disease in Pregnancy
    Valvular Heart Disease
    Cardiomyopathy
    Pericardial disease
    Heart Disease in South Asians
    Women's Cardiovascular Disease

  • Pik Fang Kho

    Pik Fang Kho

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioI obtained my PhD in genetic epidemiology at Queensland University of Technology (Australia), where my research was focused on using genetic and genomic approaches to identify risk factors for endometrial cancer. During my graduate studies, I gained experience in large-scale genetic association studies and leveraging the correlation between diseases in genetic studies to identify novel genetic variants associated with endometrial cancer. I also developed expertise in various statistical genetic approaches in multi-omics data, including fine-mapping and colocalization analyses, to prioritize candidate causal variants and genes. I also gained extensive experience in genetic causal inference analysis to infer causality between risk factors and health outcomes.

    My research focus since moving to Stanford has been the identification of genetic and non-genetic determinants of cardiometabolic diseases. I am currently involved in projects including large-scale genetic association studies, multi-trait analysis with correlated traits, development and validation of polygenic risk scores, integrative analyses with multi-omics data, as well as Mendelian randomization analyses to advance our understanding of the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to cardiometabolic diseases.