School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Michael J. Kaplan

    Michael J. Kaplan

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) New therapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer, including immune stimulation possibilities (IRX-2 protocol), integration of biological modifiers, and, eventually, genetic approaches.
    2) Head and neck cancer stem cells: identification, characterization, control--in conjunction with the Irv Weissman and Michael Clarke labs in the Stem Cell Institute
    3) Development of innovative surgical methods at the anterior cranial base

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Julia Kaltschmidt

    Julia Kaltschmidt

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe lab’s goal is to understand the molecular basis of neuronal circuit formation. We are particularly interested in circuits that underlie locomotion, sexual function and gut motility.

    Spinal circuits underlying locomotor function:
    Local inhibitory microcircuits have a fundamental role in shaping animal behavior. In the mammalian spinal cord inhibitory interneurons modulate the sensory-motor signaling that controls locomotion. We are using a specific interneuron circuit to understand (i) how distinct neuronal populations are generated, (ii) how these distinct neuronal populations recognize and choose their correct synaptic partners from among different available targets, and (iii) how postsynaptic signals induce the differentiation of presynaptic terminals in service of balanced circuit function.

    Spinal circuitry of sexual function:
    During mammalian copulation, spinal circuits reflexively integrate sexually-specific sensory information. We are performing anatomical reconstructions of erectile circuits in the spinal cord, and are analyzing copulatory behavior in males with disrupted interneuron circuitry.

    Enteric nervous system structure and function:
    The enteric nervous system (ENS) in the gut contains more neurons than the spinal cord and presents a translational model relevant to many human illnesses. However, relatively little is known about the development, connectivity and function of ENS circuitry. The mouse ENS is experimentally tractable and allows application of molecular genetic and high-resolution imaging techniques, as well as innovative in vivo experimental approaches. We aim to (i) map ENS circuit connectivity and (ii) explore functional consequences of ENS circuit abnormalities.

  • Hannah Kim

    Hannah Kim

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Neurosurgery

    BioI am interested in studying learning and memory in epilepsy, and how optogenetic suppression of seizures can affect the cognitive deficits found in a mouse model of epilepsy.

  • Michel Kliot

    Michel Kliot

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio            I grew up in New York City where I attended the oldest school in the Country, Collegiate, from 2nd grade to high school.  I then went to college at Harvard, receiving both a BA and MA, and Medical School at Yale.  Along the way I did graduate work in Neurobiology at Stanford.  I then returned to New York City and did an internship and neurosurgical residency at the Neurological Institute.  I was then given a wonderful opportunity to do a one year traveling Peripheral Nerve Fellowship in which I spent time at the University of Toronto in Canada and time at Louisiana State University in New Orleans.  I then joined the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Washington in Seattle.  There between 1991 and 2011 I rose through the academic ranks eventually becoming a Professor and Director of the Peripheral Nerve Center, as well as Acting Head of the section of neurosurgery at the Puget Sound VA Health Care System.  I then moved to UCSF in 2012 where I headed up their peripheral nerve effort and established their Center for Evaluation and Surgical Management of Peripheral Nerve Disorders.  In the summer of 2014 I moved to join the Department of Neurosurgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Peripheral Nerve Center.  During the past year I was asked to serve as interim Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery when the Chair, a close friend and colleague, suddenly died.  At Northwestern I continue to pursue and develop my interests in the following areas:  pushing the frontiers of peripheral nerve surgery by pioneering new imaging and surgical techniques; teaching residents and medical students; collaborating with clinical and research colleagues; and continuing my ongoing interest in biotechnology by taking ideas from their inception into the clinical arena.  I am now in the process of transitioning to Santa Barbra where I hope to help develop a Peripheral Nerve Center that can treat patients with a wide range of complex peripheral nerve problems. I will also be working part-time in the Dept of Neurosurgery at Stanford.  I remain very interested in finding ways to use the internet as a platform to educate patients and improve their care.  I also am dedicated to improving the overall patient experience.

  • Jeffrey Krauss, MD

    Jeffrey Krauss, MD

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    BioPhysical medicine and rehabilitation
    Digital health
    Lifestyle medicine