School of Medicine


Showing 1-18 of 18 Results

  • Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI am a translational physician-scientist focused on studying the role of the immune system in patients with schizophrenia. My work spans careful clinical characterization of patients to understanding mechanisms in basic science model systems, allowing to provide mechanistic understanding to observations in clinical samples. Currently, I'm focused on deciphering the role of the complement system and how the known genetic risk translates into pathophysiological disease mechanisms. I hope that this work will pave the way to novel treatment strategies.

  • Katherine Kaplan

    Katherine Kaplan

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kaplan's research interests span four (often overlapping) domains: (1) pathophysiologic aspects of insomnia and hypersomnia in mood disorders, including mechanisms, correlates, and sequelae of these sleep disturbances; (2) behavioral interventions for sleep disturbances in adults and adolescents; (3) circadian and psychosocial factors impacting sleep in adolescence; and (4) machine learning approaches to big data.

  • Gloria M. Kardong MD, DLFAPA, DABPN

    Gloria M. Kardong MD, DLFAPA, DABPN

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI attended Stanford University as an undergraduate, then returned to Stanford for my Psychiatry residency and Chief Residency. I then joined the Faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. I am an adjunct Clinical Associate Professor. I teach and supervise the residents in the program.
    I am also on the Faculty of the Stanford Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program, where I teach and supervise post-graduate Fellows.
    I have served an Examiner for the Medical Board of California and do Forensic Psychiatry/Expert Witness work for attorneys as part of my private practice for the past 15 years.

    I have been in private practice for 35 years, including 15 years of virtual care. I am licensed in 10 states and can provide telepsychiatry services in all of those states.

    Among my specialties are trauma; abuse; PTSD; women's health care-related issues, including pregnacy and post-partum issues, PMS, menopause and hormonal issues across the life span.

    I also enjoy treating student health-related concerns and helping impaired professionals.

    I treat all psychiatric problems for men, women, adolescents and couples. This includes anxiety, panic, bipolar disorder, ADHD, relationship issues and more.

  • Krishna Govinda Kary (they/them)

    Krishna Govinda Kary (they/them)

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Krishna Kary (they/them) is a licensed psychologist who specializes in working with adolescents, adults, and couples within the LGBTQ+ community to address concerns related to depression, anxiety, sexuality, identity and interpersonal challenges. Dr. Kary received their PhD in Counseling Psychology from the Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They received their MA and BS from Santa Clara University in Counseling and Psychology, respectively. Their clinical internship was completed at the University of California, Los Angeles Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and their postdoctoral Gender and Sexual Identities fellowship at Stanford University CAPS. Dr. Kary serves patients through the THRIVE clinic at the Stanford School of Medicine and is emotion-focused, collaborative, and culturally-sensitive in their approach to psychotherapy. In addition to their interest in clinical care, they also enjoy supervision and training, teaching, and consultation related to gender inclusivity practices.

  • Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI am psychologist and have been practicing psychotherapy for over 18 years. I have experience working with a diverse group of clients with respect to presenting concerns, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity.

    Regardless of their background, the majority of my clients are highly intelligent and accomplished people who are interested in taking their personal and professional relationships to the next level, starting with themselves. My therapeutic approach blends my first-hand experience of the high-performing professional workplace with buddhist psychology and tools to offer support that is unrelentingly compassionate, direct, and powerful.

    I have particular research and clinical expertise in authenticity with one's self and in relationships, interpersonal communication, and issues of sexual orientation, gender, and sexuality. My services include individual, couples, and group psychotherapy. I also do video counseling sessions with individuals and couples in CA, DC and VA, the places where I am licensed.

    I earned my master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland’s Counseling Psychology program. I completed my internship and post-doctoral training, and was a Staff Psychologist at the The George Washington University Counseling Center for several years before starting my private practice. I am currently in the Interpersonal Dynamics Facilitator Training Program at Stanford University in the Graduate School of Business to become a small group facilitator for their popular elective, Interpersonal Dynamics.

    I have been practicing Vipassana meditation for over fifteen years. I’ve spent eighty-five days on silent meditation retreats in that time, and have a mindfulness orientation to my work.

    I am a member of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Northern California Group Psychotherapy Society, and the Northern California Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology. I am licensed and insured in California (PSY28532), Washington D.C. (PSY1000362) and Virginia (PSY0810004715).

  • Jennifer Keller

    Jennifer Keller

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsinterpersonal violence and abuse prevention; empowerment of women; cognitive and affective information processing in depression; clinical, biological, and neuropsychological aspects of depression; South Asian mental health

  • Kevin Kelley

    Kevin Kelley

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioAs a neuroscientist and psychiatrist, I am motivated by how little we understand about the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and hope that further knowledge will help to alleviate the ongoing distress of many of our patients. My research program leverages computational genomics, human brain cellular models, and molecular neuroscience techniques to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of human brain development and how dysfunction in these processes lead to psychiatric disorders.

  • Terence Ketter

    Terence Ketter

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Psychopharmacology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe use of brain imaging methods for understanding the neurobiology of mood disorders and to target treatments for patients with bipolar disorders. Research in the use of novel medications and combinations of medications in the treatment of bipolar disorders. Research on the development and course of bipolar disorder in late adolescence and young adulthood, particularly in college students, and links between creativity, temperament, and mood disorders.

  • Daniel Kim

    Daniel Kim

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Daniel Kim is a board-certified geriatric psychiatrist who serves as medical director of the inpatient geriatric psychiatry service and program director of the geriatric psychiatry fellowship. His primary area of interest is in the education of medical students, residents, and fellows in geriatric psychiatry.

  • Ian H. Kratter, MD, PhD

    Ian H. Kratter, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Kratter is an adult psychiatrist and fellowship-trained neuropsychiatrist and Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is also director of Invasive Technologies in the Stanford Brain Stimulation Laboratory.

    His clinical interests include the psychiatric and cognitive aspects of movement disorders like Parkinson's and Tourette's as well as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and non-invasive and invasive neuromodulation for neuropsychiatric illness.

    His research interests focus on assessing outcomes and understanding the mechanisms of both neuromodulatory and novel pharmacological treatments. This includes both clinical and more mechanistic studies, such as using techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and deep brain stimulation in combination with neuroimaging and electrophysiology. He has been a co-investigator for such studies focusing on obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depressive disorder, and suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury.
    His work has appeared in a number of scientific journals including Nature Medicine, American Journal of Psychiatry, Journal of Clinical Investigation, Translational Psychiatry, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. He also co-authored the chapter on major depression in the textbook Deep Brain Stimulation: Techniques and Practice.