School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • Caleb Lareau

    Caleb Lareau

    Instructor, Pathology

    BioI am a scientist with expertise in single-cell genomics, immunology, and molecular genetics. I am passionate about the development and application of new technologies to study human disease and design new therapeutic interventions. My research focuses on how cells evolve within an individual’s lifetime from molecular triggers, including somatic mutations and exposures to pathogens, and how these can lead to the predisposition of age-associated diseases.

  • Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Professor of Pathology, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction and evolution of the Myb oncogene family; function and evolution of E2F transcriptional regulators and RB tumor suppressors; epigenetic regulation of chromatin and chromosomes; cancer genetics.

  • Amy Lo

    Amy Lo

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    BioDr. Amy Lo is a pathologist with board certification in anatomic pathology, clinical pathology and molecular genetic pathology. She completed her MD and MS at the University of Illinois at Chicago and her residency in both anatomic and clinical pathology at Northwestern University. She then joined the faculty at Northwestern University as a Clinical Instructor and Advanced Gastrointestinal/Surgical Pathology Fellow. Amy then completed a molecular genetic pathology fellowship at Stanford University.

    In 2016, Amy joined Genentech as research pathology scientist supporting drug research and development with a focus in oncology and individualized drug development.
    Additionally, Amy continues clinical work as an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in pathology at Stanford University and Lucille Packard’s Children’s Hospital.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Jonathan Long is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and an Institute Scholar of Stanford ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Prior to arriving to Stanford in 2018, Dr. Long completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at Scripps Research with Benjamin F. Cravatt and his postdoctoral work at Harvard Medical School/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute with Bruce M. Spiegelman. His contributions in the areas of lipid biochemistry and energy homeostasis have been recognized by numerous awards from the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association. At Stanford, the Long laboratory studies signaling pathways in mammalian energy metabolism. The long-term goal of this work is to discover new molecules and pathways that can be translated into therapeutic opportunities for obesity, metabolic disease, and other age-associated chronic diseases.

  • Teri A Longacre

    Teri A Longacre

    Richard L. Kempson, MD, Professor in Surgical Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGynecological, breast and gastrointestinal pathology with major emphasis on ovarian cancer and ovarian tumors of low malignant potential. Pathology of familial and hereditary breast-ovarian-GI cancer.

  • Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe

    Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Lowe joined the School of Medicine faculty in 2019. She received her undergraduate degree in Biology from MIT and her medical degree at UCSD, prior to residency and cytology fellowship at UCLA. In 2011, she joined the faculty at Brigham and Women's Hospital where she developed a research focus on Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) and the application of new technology to improve clinical and molecular diagnostics. Clinically, her interests focus on Cytopathology and Genitourinary Pathology.

  • Bingwei Lu

    Bingwei Lu

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding how neural stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation and how deregulation of this process can result in brain tumor. We are also interested in mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We are using both Drosophila and mammalian models to address these fundamental questions.