School of Medicine


Showing 1-39 of 39 Results

  • Richard Lafayette

    Richard Lafayette

    Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are continuing to grow a glomerulonephritis cohort study, including immunologic characterization. We have completed interventional studies of preeclampsia exploring the nitric oxide, endothelin system and effects on glomerular function and morphometry. We continue to recruit patients for treatment and observational studies of glomerular disease, including FSGS, membranous and particularly IgA nephropathy. We also are actively studying renal disease in systemic amyloidosis.

  • Philip W. Lavori

    Philip W. Lavori

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiostatistics, clinical trials, longitudinal studies, casual inference from observational studies, genetic tissue banking, informed consent. Trial designs for dynamic (adaptive) treatment regimes, psychiatric research, cancer.

  • Laura C. Lazzeroni, Ph.D.

    Laura C. Lazzeroni, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStatistics/Data Science. I develop & apply models, methods & algorithms for complex data in medical science & biology. I am also interested in the interplay between fundamental statistical properties (e.g. variability, bias, p-values) & how scientists actually use & interpret data. My work in statistical genetics includes: the invention of Plaid bi-clustering for gene expression data; methods for twin, association, & family studies; multiple testing & estimation for high dimensional arrays.

  • Anson Lee

    Anson Lee

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery)

    BioDr. Anson Lee specializes in the surgical treatment of all heart diseases, including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, aortic disease, and arrhythmias. He has practiced cardiothoracic surgery at Stanford since 2015. Dr. Lee has a special interest in the surgical treatment of abnormal heart rhythms and minimally invasive techniques to treat heart disease.

  • David Lee, MD

    David Lee, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Novel treatments and devices for the treatment of valvular disease
    2. Alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
    3. Novel approaches to coronary revascularization
    4. Closure devices for atrial septal defects and patent foramen ovale
    5. Novel treatments for hypertension

  • Jason T. Lee, MD

    Jason T. Lee, MD

    Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lee is the Principal Investigator on several clinical trials examining therapeutic strategies for management of complex aortic aneurysm disease as well as aortic dissection.

    Dr. Lee’s clinical interests include:

    •Endovascular repair of abdominal/thoracic aneurysms and dissections
    Fenestrated and Branch Repair of the thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal aneurysms
    •Carotid stenting
    •Thoracic outlet syndrome
    •Vascular disorders in high-performance athletes

  • Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical scientist (PhD epidemiology), endocrinologist, and CMO at VAPA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center. My group does pattern and prediction mapping along the life-course of interventions/outcomes and how healthcare system can positively impact health longitudinally. We use novel molecular epi, 'big' data like EHRs using multiple designs/methods/technologies. These interests cut across multiple complex chronic diseases and lifespan.
    https://med.stanford.edu/jleelab.html

  • Julie J Lee

    Julie J Lee

    Affiliate, Peds/Clinical Informatics

    BioJulie J. Lee, MD, MPH, is a board-certified internal medicine physician and clinical informaticist at Stanford University. Dr. Lee's expertise in clinical informatics enables her to effectively implement informatics-driven approaches and clinically integrate AI models to improve patient health outcomes, alleviate physician burnout by streamlining workflows, and champion health equity.

    Dr. Lee has been key to several initiatives in improving operational processes within Stanford. Her efforts range from advancing the governance and operations of Clinical Decision Support to the strategic integration of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program into the electronic health record (EHR), thereby reducing clinician work burden in addressing the opioid crisis. Additionally, she has worked on innovative solutions to improve patient-physician communications--she created a dynamic EHR tool for better triage and processing by medical staff before reaching the doctors.

    Health equity is her north star, informing Dr. Lee to dedicated engagement with historically underrepresented populations in medical research and collaborative partnerships between academia and community healthcare practitioners. Her previous role as an EpiScholar with the Los Angeles Department of Public Health involved researching the impact of language and acculturation on the Latino population's dietary habits and health behaviors, with a particular focus on diabetes. She has also worked with community health centers in east Los Angeles to bridge the translational gap between academic research and frontline healthcare workers, facilitating the transfer of cutting-edge liver disease research to those treating patients with substance abuse-related liver conditions. Of major clinical interest is cardiovascular disease—she has published several papers on impact of sex-specific risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women and transgender population.

    Currently, as a part of her informatics approaches, Dr. Lee focuses health equity on leveraging patient data and AI/ML models to identify and mitigate health disparities, making certain they function as instruments of equity rather than increasing gaps. She is a member of Healthcare AI Applied Research Team (HEA3RT) with a focus on bringing code to bedside.

    In the upcoming academic year, Dr. Lee will lead as health equity informaticist within the Primary Care Population Health division at Stanford.

  • Marc Leon MD, PhD (aka Hongliang Liang)

    Marc Leon MD, PhD (aka Hongliang Liang)

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioMarc Leon (also known as Hongliang Liang), M.D., Ph.D., previously served as Chief Surgeon, Associate Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery, and Director of the Division of Coronary Artery Surgery at Xijing Hospital in Xi'an, China. Currently, he is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford Hospital. Dr. Leon is a surgeon member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS), the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT), and the Chinese American Academy of Cardiology (CAAC). His clinical and research expertise includes the surgical management of cardiopulmonary failure, heart valve disease, and ischemic heart disease, along with the application of stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction. Additionally, Dr. Leon is actively engaged in exploring the application of artificial intelligence in the field of cardiovascular diseases.

  • Lawrence Leung

    Lawrence Leung

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur long term interest is to have a better understanding of the natural antithrombotic pathways and the pathophysiology of vascular thrombosis. We have focused on thrombin, the key enzyme in the blood clotting cascade.Our goal is to develop new antithrombotic agents and devise new diagnostic tests for vascular thrombotic disorders.

  • Marc Levenston

    Marc Levenston

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab's research involves the function, degeneration and repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, with a focus on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage. We are particularly interested in the complex interactions between biophysical and biochemical cues in controlling cell behavior, the roles of these interactions in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, and development of tissue engineered 3D model systems for studying physical influences on primary and progenitor cells.

  • Craig Levin

    Craig Levin

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford/Nuclear Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Physics, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Imaging Instrumentation
    Laboratory

    Our research interests involve the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of cellular and molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animal subjects.

  • Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor

    BioDr. Lewis is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in cardiovascular medicine. He is the chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and a professor of cardiovascular medicine.

    Dr. Lewis is an esteemed clinician-scientist who specializes in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He is an internationally recognized expert on heart failure, heart transplant, and quality of life for heart failure patients. He cares deeply about his patients as well as his colleagues, the hospital, and the School of Medicine. Dr. Lewis is committed to diversity and inclusion, as well as expanding Stanford clinical research initiatives.

    A fundamental principle of Dr. Lewis’ practice is his belief that “there is more to life than death,” that cardiovascular care should go beyond helping patients survive to also helping them enjoy the best possible quality of life.

    Dr. Lewis has deep expertise in conducting clinical trials examining diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to heart failure. He has done innovative work to create systems for incorporating quality of life measures for cardiovascular patients into electronic health records. This research has received support from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

    Much of his quality of life research has focused on patient-reported outcomes. Dr. Lewis emphasizes the importance of looking at how a disease, whether chronic or acute, impacts people’s ability to function and perform their activities of daily living. Strategies to improve patients’ well-being focus not only on their physical symptoms but also on depression, anxiety, exercise capacity, and ability to function in daily living.

    Dr. Lewis’ commitment to expanding clinical research initiatives will give patients more opportunities to participate in the clinical trials and access the latest care strategies that can translate into better outcomes. The goal is early access to the most advanced technology, pharmacology, and device therapy that can change outcomes for the better. He also envisions forming closer partnerships with community cardiologists and capitalizing further on Stanford’s proximity to and unique relationships with the digital technology leaders of Silicon Valley to enhance the use of digital technology for monitoring patients, optimizing treatment, and tracking outcomes.

    He has authored nearly 200 articles published in peer-reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, JAMA Cardiology, JAMA Internal Medicine, and many more. He is also on multiple editorial boards for cardiovascular journals and was an associate editor for Circulation–Heart Failure. In addition, he is an author of professional society clinical practice guidelines and scientific statements from both the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Food and Drug Administration.

    Dr. Lewis’ honors for clinical care, scholarship, and research include the Joel Gordon Miller Award for community service and leadership from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He also was one of the first recipients of the Minority Faculty Development Award, which recognizes the research potential of young physicians. Dr. Lewis has received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the role of quality of life assessment in clinical decision making in patients with heart failure.

    He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the National American Heart Association (AHA) Research Committee. In addition, Dr. Lewis was as a member of the AHA Founders Affiliate Board of Directors, chair of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, and research chair of the Association of Black Cardiologists. He also serves on scientific committees to review grants for the AHA and on the FDA Task Force for the Standardization of Definitions for Endpoint Events in Cardiovascular Trials.

  • Jin Billy Li

    Jin Billy Li

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Li Lab is primarily interested in RNA editing mediated by ADAR enzymes. We co-discovered that the major function of RNA editing is to label endogenous dsRNAs as "self" to avoid being recognized as "non-self" by MDA5, a host innate immune dsRNA sensor, leading us to pursue therapeutic applications in cancer, autoimmune diseases, and viral infection. The other major direction of the lab is to develop technologies to harness endogenous ADAR enzymes for site-specific transcriptome engineering.

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    BioStanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Ronglih Liao

    Ronglih Liao

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease

    BioDr. Liao is a Professor of Medicine and co-Director of Stanford Cardiac Amyloid Center. The major goal of her research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of heart failure and developing novel treatments to combat this process. Her laboratory has played an international leading role in the study of amyloid light chain (AL) cardiomyopathy, a rare and fatal form of cardiovascular disease. We have described the underlying pathophysiologic basis for amyloid cardiomyopathy and found that the circulating amyloidogenic light chain proteins that characterize this disease directly result in a specific cardiotoxic response. Consequently, our research work has redefined AL cardiomyopathy and has raised new treatment approaches. More recently, her research efforts have expanded to include transthyretin (ATTR) cardiac amyloidosis.

    In line with her goal of revealing novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiovascular disease, our efforts have also focused on characterizing and harnessing endogenous cardiac regenerative mechanisms. Her laboratory initially demonstrated the therapeutic potential of exogenous primitive muscle cells delivered to the injured heart. This work was among the earliest milestones in the field and served as the basis for an international trial of cell-based therapy. Subsequently, Liao lab identified and characterized a population of cardiac progenitor cells and its relationship and dynamic activity following cardiac injury in the adult heart. Her laboratory aims to reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart and to harness such repair mechanisms for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Liao has lectured extensively on both amyloid cardiomyopathy and stem cell biology, and have maintained a history of independent NIH funding in these areas for more than two decades.

    Over the course of her academic career, she has taken the greatest pride in mentoring the next generation of scientists. Dr. Liao has had the privilege to supervise several dozen students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to independent academic careers at the highest institutions. Her contribution to the advancement of scientific knowledge also includes lecturing at various university and academic institutions as well as at scores of conferences and symposia locally, nationally, and internationally.

  • Michaela Liedtke

    Michaela Liedtke

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Design of phase I/II trials for the treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    2) Conduct of clinical trials to improve the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    3) Outcomes research using clinical databases for patients with Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

  • Bryant Lin

    Bryant Lin

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests-Digital Health
    -Medical device design, prototyping, testing and clinical trials
    -Behavioral determinants of chronic disease
    -Novel diagnostic processes for medical mysteries
    -Asian Health
    -Medical Humanities and Arts
    -Medical Technology

  • Margaret Chin-Chin Lin

    Margaret Chin-Chin Lin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology

    BioDr. Margaret Lin is a board certified radiologist with subspecialty training in thoracic and cardiovascular imaging. Dr. Lin specializes in diseases affecting the lungs and airways, including cancer, infection, and interstitial and inhalational lung diseases. Dr. Lin has a passion for resident education and development of curricula and new educational tools. She is the current Program Director for the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program.

  • Michael Lin

    Michael Lin

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology
    On Partial Leave from 07/01/2024 To 12/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab applies biochemical and engineering principles to the development of protein-based tools for investigating biology in living animals. Topics of investigation include fluorescent protein-based voltage indicators, synthetic light-controllable proteins, bioluminescent reporters, and applications to studying animal models of disease.

  • Yihan Lin, MD MPH

    Yihan Lin, MD MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Lin is a cardiothoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She provides the complete spectrum of surgical care for cardiac conditions, including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, aortic disease, and arrhythmias.

    Dr. Lin's research is focused on surgical education and global disparities in surgical care. She obtained her Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research aims to decrease barriers and disparities in surgical care, including in low and middle income settings.

  • Bruce Ling

    Bruce Ling

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA significant focus of my career is the use of AI to decode real-world datasets of electronic health records, high-resolution LCMS-based liquid/tissue biopsy proteomics/metabolomics, and multiple modality medical imaging.

  • Douglas Liou

    Douglas Liou

    Clinical Associate Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Liou is a local product, having grown up in Salinas and graduated from U.C. Berkeley with a degree in Molecular and Cell Biology. He received his M.D. from New York Medical College and completed his General Surgery training at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. At Cedars, he was recognized for his excellence in clinical care and research with numerous awards and publications. Dr. Liou recently completed his 2 years of Thoracic Surgery training at Stanford, during which time he proved to be an outstanding physician and surgeon and a dedicated clinical researcher.

    Dr. Liou’s expertise includes all surgical diseases of the lung, mediastinum, esophagus, chest wall, and diaphragm, with particular interest in thoracic oncology and minimally invasive surgical techniques. He has extensive experience with minimally invasive and open management of lung and esophageal cancer, mediastinal tumors, and benign esophageal disease. Dr. Liou's primary research focus has been on clinical outcomes in thoracic oncology and quality improvement.

    Dr. Liou practices out of Stanford Hospital main campus and Stanford Health Care-ValleyCare Hospital in Pleasanton, where he is starting Stanford's Thoracic Surgery program in the East Bay.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    BioHow the richly varied cell-types in the human body arise from one embryonic cell is a biological marvel and mystery. We have mapped how human embryonic stem cells develop into over twenty different human cell-types. This roadmap allowed us to generate enriched populations of human liver, bone, heart and blood vessel cells in a Petri dish from embryonic stem cells. Each of these human cells could regenerate their cognate tissue upon injection into respective mouse models, with relevance to regenerative medicine. In addition to developmental and stem cell biology, we have an emerging interest in exploring deadly biosafety level 4 viruses together with our collaborators.

    Kyle attended the County College of Morris and Rutgers, and received his Ph.D. from Stanford (working with Irving Weissman), with fellowships from the Hertz Foundation, National Science Foundation and Davidson Institute for Talent Development. He then continued as a Siebel Investigator, and later, as an Assistant Professor and The Anthony DiGenova Endowed Faculty Scholar at Stanford, where he is jointly appointed in the Department of Developmental Biology and Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. Kyle is a Packard Fellow, Pew Scholar, Human Frontier Science Program Young Investigator and Baxter Foundation Faculty Scholar, and his research has been recognized by the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, Forbes 30 Under 30, Harold Weintraub Graduate Award, Hertz Foundation Thesis Prize and A*STAR Investigatorship.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Jonathan Long is an Associate Professor of Pathology and an Institute Scholar of Stanford ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). His laboratory studies signaling pathways in mammalian energy metabolism. The long-term goal of this program is to discover new molecules and pathways that can be translated into therapeutic opportunities for obesity, metabolic disease, and other age-associated chronic diseases. Work from the laboratory has been recognized by numerous awards from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the American Diabetes Association, and the Ono Pharma Foundation. Prior to arriving to Stanford, Dr. Long completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at Scripps Research and his postdoctoral work at Harvard Medical School.

  • Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2) Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis repair, 4) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 5) Skeletal Stem Cells, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

  • James Longoria, MD

    James Longoria, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Longoria is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiothoracic surgeon. He is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Deeply accomplished in all facets of complex adult cardiothoracic procedures, Dr. Longoria is a high-volume surgeon with more than 20 years of experience and an exceptionally low mortality and complication rate.

    Dr. Longoria’s surgical experience includes complex mitral valve and tricuspid valve repair, coronary artery bypass grafting, adult congenital repair, as well as procedures for high risk VAD patients. He performs cardiac transplantation, carotid endarterectomy, and implantation of all FDA-approved mechanical circulatory support devices. Additionally, he performs catheter-based valvular procedures (such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR) and open and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for pulmonary surgical procedures.

    He has an applied interest in atrial fibrillation (AFib) and is a nationally recognized expert in the minimally invasive surgical treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib). Dr. Longoria was issued a method patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for developing the TTMaze (Totally Thoracoscopic) procedure that is central to the Dual Epicardial Endocardial Persistent (DEEP) AFib clinical trial.

    Before joining Stanford, Dr. Longoria was the surgical director of cardiac ablation at a prominent AFib center certified by the Society of Chest Pain Centers. He holds patents for a synthetic chord used to connect tissue and for specialized methods he developed to treat cardiac arrhythmias.

    At Stanford, Dr. Longoria brings a commitment to patientcentric, personalized care. He is committed to making the experience of surgery as pleasant as possible for his patients. He is also excited for the opportunity to conduct translational research that utilizes the most advanced technology available, in collaboration with colleagues from other disciplines.

    For his outcomes and high patient satisfaction ratings, Dr. Longoria has earned awards and recognition, including being named a Top Doctor of Sacramento by his peers for the last five years in a row. He has also been an honoree of the President’s Award for patient satisfaction by the Sutter Independent Physicians.

    Dr. Longoria has published articles on genetic variants associated with atrial fibrillation, thoracoscopic left atrial appendage clipping, radiofrequency ablation, and other topics. His work has appeared in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, and elsewhere.

    He has made numerous presentations on atrial fibrillation surgery and other topics at conferences including the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    Dr. Longoria is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and American College of Cardiology. He is a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, Western Thoracic Surgical Association, the International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery, and the Heart Rhythm Society.

  • Norman Lowenbraun

    Norman Lowenbraun

    Member, Cardiovascular Institute

    BioDr Lowenbraun has been a practicing cardiologist in the Bay Area for over 25 years, having moved here after receiving his medical and specialty training on the East Coast. He believes offering the personal care of a community setting and empowering the patient in their healthcare decisions, combined with the resources of Stanford Hospital , offers his patients the best of both worlds.

  • Matthew Lungren

    Matthew Lungren

    Adjunct Professor, Biomedical Data Science

    BioDr. Lungren is Chief Data Science Officer for Microsoft Health & Life Sciences where he focuses on translating cutting edge technology, including generative AI and cloud services, into innovative healthcare applications. As a physician and clinical machine learning researcher, he maintains a part-time clinical practice at UCSF while also continuing his research and teaching roles as adjunct professor at Stanford University.

    Prior to joining Microsoft, Dr Lungren was a clinical interventional radiologist and research faculty at Stanford University Medical School where he led the Stanford Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and Imaging (AIMI). He later served as Principal for Clinical AI/ML at Amazon Web Services in World Wide Public Sector Healthcare, focusing on business development for clinical machine learning technologies in the public cloud.

    His scientific work has led to more than 150 publications, including work on multi-modal data fusion models for healthcare applications, new computer vision and natural language processing approaches for healthcare specific domains, opportunistic screening with machine learning for public health applications, open medical data as public good, prospective clinical trials for clinical AI translation, and application of generative AI in healthcare. He has served as advisor for early stage startups and large fortune-500 companies on healthcare AI technology development and go-to-market strategy. Dr. Lungren's work has been featured in national news outlets such as NPR, Vice News, Scientific American, and he regularly speaks at national and international scientific meetings on the topic of AI in healthcare.

    Dr. Lungren is also a top rated instructor on Coursera where his AI in Healthcare course designed especially for learners with non-technical backgrounds has been completed by more than 20k students around the world - enrollment is open now: https://www.coursera.org/learn/fundamental-machine-learning-healthcare