School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 39 Results

  • Grace Lee

    Grace Lee

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    BioDr. Grace Lee is Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine and Associate Chief Medical Officer for Practice Innovation at Stanford Children’s Health. In her current role, Dr. Lee primarily serves as a clinical and administrative leader for the health system focused on bridging quality, research and implementation for the organization. She previously served as the Principal Investigator (PI) on the CDC-funded Vaccine Safety Datalink project, Associate Director of the FDA-funded Mini-Sentinel Project, PI of an AHRQ-funded grant to develop a national surveillance definition for pediatric ventilator-associated events and to identify potential intervention bundles to improve quality of care, and PI of an AHRQ-funded grant to evaluate the health and economic impact of the CMS Hospital-Acquired Conditions and Value-Based Purchasing policies. Dr. Lee previously served as a member on the Institute of Medicine Committee (IOM) to Review Priorities in the National Vaccine Plan, the IOM Committee on the Ethical and Scientific Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs, NASEM's Vaccine Research and Development Recommendations for Advancing Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Preparedness and Response, and AHRQ's Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research Study Section. Dr. Lee also served as a Board Member for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), and the National Academy of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Practice. She is currently the Chair of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that sets recommendations for the use of vaccines in the U.S. population, including COVID-19 vaccines, and liaison to the Board of Scientific Counselors for CDC's Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases.

  • Henry C. Lee

    Henry C. Lee

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPerinatal / neonatal epidemiology.
    Assessment of quality of care for mothers and newborns.
    Quality improvement, dissemination, and implementation of evidence-based practices.
    Simulation in neonatal resuscitation.
    Innovation in safety / delivery room care for mothers and newborns
    Benefits of breast milk for preterm infants.
    Perinatal health disparities

  • Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Ph.D

    Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Ph.D

    Sr Research Scholar, Pediatrics - Center for Biomedical Ethics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lee is a medical anthropologist whose research focuses on the sociocultural dimensions and ethical issues of emerging technologies and their translation into clinical practice. Dr. Lee leads studies on the public understandings of research using clinical data and biological samples, concepts of race, culture and human genetic variation, and citizen science, commercialization of biotechnology and entrepreneurship.

  • Mary Leonard

    Mary Leonard

    Arline and Pete Harman Professor and Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy multidisciplinary research program is focused on (1) the detrimental effects of glucocorticoids, sarcopenia and inflammation on bone development in pediatric diseases, (2) the long-term effects of childhood cancer on bone and muscle quality, (3) the assessment of renal osteodystrophy using novel micro-imaging techniques, (4) the effects of vitamin D deficiency on physical function and cardiovascular disease, and (5) the evaluation of biomechanical interventions as anabolic bone therapies.

  • David B. Lewis

    David B. Lewis

    Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory is focused on defining cellular and molecular mechanisms that limit T cell responses to vaccines and pathogens during normal early postnatal development and in cases of inherited genetic immunodeficiencies. We are also determinomg how these limitations in immunity can be overcome by using novel approaches for vaccine adjuvants for influenza vaccine and by using catalytically inactive Cas proteins for inducing endogenous gene expression.