School of Medicine


Showing 1-9 of 9 Results

  • Magdalena Matusiak

    Magdalena Matusiak

    Instructor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on revealing clinically relevant prognostic markers associated with myeloid cell biology in solid malignancies. I currently. lead two main projects: first, using single-cell RNA Sequencing and bulk tissue genomics to discover tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) diversity and establish their prognostic and predictive markers, second: using multiplex tissue imaging (MIBI) to unravel prognostic markers of spatial heterogeneity in the colon cancer.

  • Joshua Menke

    Joshua Menke

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioDr. Joshua Menke completed his hematopathology fellowship at Stanford and cytopathology fellowship at University of California San Francisco (UCSF). His clinical and research interests lie at the intersection of hematopathology, cytopathology and advanced single cell and cell free diagnostic techniques. As Associate Section Director of Clinical Flow Cytometry at Stanford, Dr. Menke is developing and validating new minimal residual disease assays for detecting low levels of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms in the post-treatment setting as well as multiple other 12 color flow assays with the latest markers for routine phenotyping. Dr. Menke is the receipient of the Paul E. Standjord Young Investigator Award from the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Scientists and Laurance J. Marton Award for Excellence in Research from UCSF for his translational work on CALR mutations at the UCSF Molecular Diagnostics Laboroatory. Currently, he is spearheading novel genomic and proteomic analytic techniques to study cytology samples obtained for lymphoma diagnostics, including sequencing cell-free tumor DNA from supernatant samples. Dr. Menke is a founding member of the Cytology-Hematopathology Interinstitution Collaboration (CHIC) that aims to study the performance of cytology samples in diagnosing lymphoma across large datasets from five academic institutions and currently chairs that group spearheading large clinical research studies.

  • Sara Michie

    Sara Michie

    Professor of Pathology (Research), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLymphocyte/endothelial cell adhesion mechanisms involved in lymphocyte migration to sites of inflammation; regulation of expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules.

  • Paul Salomon Mischel

    Paul Salomon Mischel

    Fortinet Founders Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research bridges cancer genetics, signal transduction and cellular metabolism as we aim to understand the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer development, progression, and drug resistance. We have made a series of discoveries that have identified a central role for ecDNA (extrachromosomal DNA) in cancer development, progression, accelerated tumor evolution and drug resistance.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Milan Gambhir Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Stephen B. Montgomery

    Stephen B. Montgomery

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Pathology, Professor of Genetics and of Biomedical Data Science
    On Partial Leave from 06/17/2024 To 08/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe focus on understanding the effects of genome variation on cellular phenotypes and cellular modeling of disease through genomic approaches such as next generation RNA sequencing in combination with developing and utilizing state-of-the-art bioinformatics and statistical genetics approaches. See our website at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/

  • Thomas Montine, MD, PhD

    Thomas Montine, MD, PhD

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Montine received his education at Columbia University (BA in Chemistry), the University of Rochester (PhD in Pharmacology), and McGill University (MD and CM). His postgraduate medical training was at Duke University, and he was junior faculty at Vanderbilt University where he was awarded the Thorne Professorship in Pathology. In 2002, Dr. Montine was appointed as the Alvord Endowed Professor in Neuropathology and Director of the Division of Neuropathology at the University of Washington. He was Director of the University of Washington Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, one of the original 10 Centers in the US, and passed that responsibility to able colleagues. Dr. Montine was the founding Director of the Pacific Udall Center, a NINDS-funded Morris K. Udall Centers of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease Research. In 2010, Dr. Montine was appointed Chair of the Department of Pathology at the University of Washington. In 2016, Dr. Montine was appointed Chair of the Department of Pathology at Stanford University where he is the Stanford Medicine Endowed Professor in Pathology.

    The focus of the Montine Laboratory is on the structural and molecular bases of cognitive impairment. The Montine Laboratory addresses this prevalent, unmet medical need through a combination of neuropathology, biomarkers for detection and progression of early disease, and experimental studies that test hypotheses concerning specific mechanisms of neuron injury and then develop novel approaches to neuroprotection. Our current approaches include small molecule precision therapeutics and cell replacement strategies for brain.