School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 19 Results

  • Maryam S. Makowski, PhD, FACN, NBC-HWC

    Maryam S. Makowski, PhD, FACN, NBC-HWC

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioMaryam S. Makowski, PhD, FACN, NBC-HWC is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and WellMD & WellPhD Center at Stanford University. Dr. Makowski has particular expertise in nutrition and physician wellness and is a National Board Certified Health and Wellness Coach. Since joining Stanford in 2016, she has been leading many initiatives that promote well-being and a culture of compassion and wellness among Stanford Medicine physicians.

    Dr. Makowski is a Fellow of the American College of Nutrition, a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, American and Canadian Nutrition Societies, and American Nutrition Association. She completed her masters and doctoral studies in clinical nutrition, nutritional epidemiology and medical science at University of Toronto in Canada. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a scientific associate at Toronto General Hospital-University Health Network in Toronto, and as an advisor to Air Canada Rouge pilots and cabin crew on optimal nutrition for fatigue mitigation. Over the course of her career, she has authored many highly cited scientific papers on nutrition and clinician well-being.

  • Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

    Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) and, by courtesy, of Emergency Medicine and of Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Law

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPathophysiology and Management of Delirium, Acute Brain Failure and Cognitive Impairment, Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Traumatic Brain Injury, Factitious Disorder & Munchausen's Syndrome, Cultural Diversity in Medical Care, Psychiatric Complications of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Conversion Disorder, Depression in the Medically Ill, Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  • Rachel Manber, PhD

    Rachel Manber, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Insomnia during pregnancy
    2) Acupuncture for chronic low back pain

  • Carmen McLean

    Carmen McLean

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)

    BioCarmen McLean, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and researcher with the Dissemination and Training Division of the National Center for PTSD at the Palo Alto VA Health Care System. Dr. McLean’s research focuses on increasing the implementation and reach of evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  • M Windy McNerney, PhD

    M Windy McNerney, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)
    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDr. M. Windy McNerney is Research Health Specialist in the MIRECC the VA Palo Alto, and a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) at Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine. She earned her PhD from the University of Notre Dame, went on to a postdoctoral position and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (DOE), and then completed fellowship at the WRIISC program at the VA and Stanford University.

    Dr. McNerney is primarily interested in the neurophysiology and biochemistry of brain and mental health diseases, especially degenerative diseases, depression, TBI, PTSD, and addiction. She is collaborating with researchers to integrate brain imaging and biochemical markers in hopes to better understand these diseases. She also is taking a lead role in investigating the biochemistry of magnetic brain stimulation. She is currently teaching two classes at Stanford, entitled “Addictions in Our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior,” and "The Opioid Epidemic: Using Neuroscience to Inform Policy and Law", which discuss the societal implications of addiction from a neurophysiological prospective.

    Selected Publications:

    McNerney, M. W., Hobday, T., Cole, B., Ganong R., Winas, N., Matthews, D., Hood, J., & Lane, S. (2019). Objective classification of mTBI using machine learning on a combination of frontal electroencephalography measurements and self-reported symptoms. Sports Medicine Open, 4, 14.

    Heath, A., Taylor, J.L., & McNerney, M. W. (2018). rTMS for Alzheimer's diseases: where should we be stimulating? Expert Rev Neurother, 18, 903.

    McNerney, M. W., Sheng, T., Nechvatal, J. M., Lee, A. G., Lyons, D. M., ... Adamson, M. M. (2018). Integration of neural and epigenetic contributions to posttraumatic stress symptoms: The role of hippocampal volume and glucocorticoid receptor gene methylation. PLOSONE, e0192222.

    Mi, Z., Biswas, K., Fairchild, K., Davis-Karim, A., Phibbs, C., Forman, S., Thase, M., Georgette, G., Beale, R., Pittman, D., McNerney, M. W., Rosen, A., Huang, G., George, M., Noda, A., & Yesavage, J. (2017). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for treatment-resistant major depression (TRMD) patients: Rational and design of a trail focusing on Veterans. Trails, 18, 409.

    Bennion, B. J., Be, N. A., McNerney, M. W., Lao V., Carlson E., Valdez, C. A., et al. (2017). Predicting a drug’s membrane permeability: A computational model validated with in vitro permeability assay data. Journal of Physical Chemistry, B, 121, 5228-5237.

    Ghasemi, M., Phillips C., Fahimi, A., McNerney M. W., & Salehi, A. (2017). Mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of NMDA receptor modulators in mood disorders. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 13, 555-572.

    See more publications at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=McNerney%20MW%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=17107728

  • Johnna Medina

    Johnna Medina

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioJohnna Medina, PhD, is a Clinical Instructor at Stanford medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, where she is an attending psychologist in the Addiction Medicine/Dual-Diagnosis Clinic and continues to collaborate on research projects evaluating mind-body interrelationships (e.g., stress and health) and interventions (e.g., hypnosis, yoga). Dr. Medina earned her bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Art Practice at Stanford University (2009) and her PhD in Clinical Psychology at UT Austin (2017). Her dissertation research focused on exercise and yoga-based interventions for targeting anxiety-related risk and maintenance factors underlying addictive behaviors. She returned to Stanford to complete her postdoctoral research fellowship (2017-2019) as a T32 scholar working under Dr. David Spiegel in the Center on Stress and Health Lab.