School of Medicine


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  • Elias Aboujaoude, MD, MA

    Elias Aboujaoude, MD, MA

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Aboujaoude is a Clinical Professor, researcher and writer at Stanford University's Department of Psychiatry, where he is Chief of the Anxiety Disorders Section and Director of the OCD Clinic and the Impulse Control Disorders Clinic. Besides the compulsivity-impulsivity spectrum, his work has focused on the intersection of technology and psychology, with an emphasis on the problematic use of Internet-related technologies, mental health in a post-privacy world, and the potential for telemedicine interventions such as virtual reality and video-based therapy to increase access to care and advance global health. His books include "Virtually You: The Dangerous Powers of the e-Personality" and "Mental Heath in the Digital Age: Grave Dangers, Great Promise". Dr. Aboujaoude also teaches psychology on the main Stanford campus and at UC Berkeley. Scholarly and media platforms that have featured his work include The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, The Harvard Business Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, BBC, PBS, and CNN.

  • Aysha Abraibesh

    Aysha Abraibesh

    Clinical Research Coordinator Associate, Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)

    BioAysha Abraibesh, MPA is a clinical research coordinator in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She works primarily on the Stanford Apnea and Insomnia Study (AIR) Study, led by Dr. Rachel Manber (more info can be found at airstudy.stanford.edu)

    Aysha earned her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology (2012) and Master’s in Public Administration (2013) both from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. She has since held multiple positions supporting research studies related to social and behavioral health issues, most recently as a Lead Behavioral Health Interviewer at Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon.

  • Sarah Adler

    Sarah Adler

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the design and delivery of clinical care using, data and technology. I have focused on disordered eating behaviors and obesity.

  • Raag Airan

    Raag Airan

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to develop and clinically implement new technologies for high-precision and noninvasive intervention upon the nervous system. Every few millimeters of the brain is functionally distinct, and different parts of the brain may have counteracting responses to therapy. To better match our therapies to neuroscience, we develop techniques that allow intervention upon only the right part of the nervous system at the right time, using technologies like focused ultrasound and nanotechnology.

  • Amy Alexander

    Amy Alexander

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCollege Mental Health, Emotional Support Animals & Service Animals, Women's Health, Mental Health & Well-being in Veterinarians

  • Neal Amin

    Neal Amin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioNeal D. Amin, MD, PhD is a practicing Stanford psychiatrist and neurobiologist who studies human cellular neurodevelopment - the process by which genetic and molecular pathways give rise to immense cellular diversity in the human brain during embryonic development. A more complete understanding of human cellular neurodevelopment will lead to the next generation of targeted therapeutics for wide ranging neuropsychiatric conditions.

    Dr. Amin completed his graduate work with Professor Samuel Pfaff (Salk Institute) where he investigated the regulatory dynamics of a miRNA associated with neurodegeneration using mouse genetic models, single cell RNA sequencing, in vivo CRISPR/Cas9, and linear and non-linear models of the impact of gene dose variation on neurodevelopment and mammalian survival (see: Amin, N.D., et al., Science, 2015; Amin, N.D.*, et al., Neuron 2021, Amin, N.D.*, et al. STAR Protocols; *co-corresponding author). At Stanford, Dr. Amin worked with Stanford Professor Sergiu Pasca, MD to use stem-cell derived human brain organoids as model of neurodevelopment and pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as 22q11 deletion syndrome and motor neuron diseases. Human brain organoids are three dimensional cellular models of the human nervous system that recapitulate complex macrostructural and cellular features of the human brain. He published a highly cited review on the utility of human brain organoid technology for studying psychiatric disorders (Amin, N.D., and Pasca, S.P. Neuron, 2018). Dr. Amin is principal investigator on awards from the NIH/NINDS (K08 Career Development Award) and the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD Young Investigator Award). He has particular interest in leveraging cutting-edge biological technologies and bioinformatics to advance the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    Dr. Amin completed the Stanford Psychiatry Research Track Residency Program and completed the Palo Alto Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program Fellowship Year. He was recognized with the Outstanding Resident Award from the NIMH/NIH for his academic contributions. He recognizes the critical importance of advancing human neuroscience for the countless patients and families suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders that lack effective treatments. He is a practicing therapist and psychiatrist in Stanford's Evaluation Clinic.