School of Medicine


Showing 1-12 of 12 Results

  • Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Palaniappan has published over 200 peer reviewed manuscripts, abstracts, and book chapters over the last 20 years in the areas of chronic disease prevention and treatment in diverse populations. She has expertise in epidemiological research using big data, use of electronic health records for research, and clinical trials.

  • Vedant Pargaonkar

    Vedant Pargaonkar

    Basic Life Research Scientist, Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioMy long-term research interests involve development of algorithms using computational methods for early detection of coronary pathophysiology including, endothelial dysfunction and microvascular dysfunction (MVD) and/or a myocardial bridge (MB) in patients with angina and no obstructive coronary artery disease (NOCAD) and the identification of novel target therapies for primary prevention and improved prognosis in these patients. Under the mentorship of Dr. Jennifer Tremmel in Cardiovascular medicine at Stanford, I have been systematically studying to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of these patients, as well as the optimal use of diagnostic testing and treatment using the angina and no-obstructive CAD Registry at Stanford. In collaboration with other investigators in this field, we have published multiple scientific articles highlighting the limitations of current testing in this population and identification of novel diagnostic tools for early diagnosis and management of patients with angina and no obstructive CAD. My research also focuses on myocardial infarction (MI) in women, particularly spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD). I have been involved in the design and execution of the first international collaborative study in SCAD, investigating peripartum vs. non-peripartum SCAD. This is analyzing the largest cohort of patients recruited from multiple US and non-US sites to understand the pathophysiological differences in these patient cohorts.

  • Victoria Parikh

    Victoria Parikh

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Parikh is a clinician scientist who cares for patients with and studies inherited (genetic) cardiovascular disease. She is the director of the Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease (SCICD) which is one of the largest of its kind in the country. SCICD integrates clinical and basic science with the expert care of patients with genetic cardiovascular conditions (e.g., cardiomyopathies, arrhythmias and vascular diseases). It provides cutting edge care for thousands of patients and families across the lifespan and integrates medical, surgical and genetics care. Our team includes physicians, nurses, advanced practice providers, genetic counselors, exercise physiologists and scientists.

    Dr. Parikh's own clinical practice and laboratory are focused on the genetics of cardiomyopathies and their associated arrhythmogenic substrates. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship at Stanford School of Medicine and her medical residency at the University of California, San Francisco. Funded by multiple research grants from the NIH, her lab seeks to identify novel mechanisms and therapeutic technologies for genetic cardiomyopathy as well as better understand the natural histories of patients affected by these diseases.

  • Marco Perez

    Marco Perez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Marco Perez's research goal is to better understand the fundamental causes of cardiovascular disease through the study of genetics and epidemiology. His group studies the genetic variations and environmental exposures that are associated with conditions such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure. He has led the studies of atrial fibrillation in Women's Health Initiative, one of the largest nation-wide population-based cohorts. He is currently conducting a large study monitoring for silent or asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in women from the WHI randomized to exercise intervention, and was co-PI of the Apple Heart Study, a clinical trial that validated the ability of a smartwatch to detect atrial fibrillation. He is now PI of the Clinical Coordinating Center at Stanford for the REACT-AF which is a clinical trial to evaluate efficacy and safety of a "pill-in-the pocket" approach to anticoagulation for AF using a smartwatch. He is interested in understanding the paradox that atrial fibrillation is less common in African Americans and Hispanics, despite a greater burden of risk factors such as hypertension. As director of the Stanford Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic, he evaluates families with rare inherited arrhythmias associated with sudden death such as Long QT and Brugada Syndromes and explores their links with novel genes. He also studies the genetic causes of very early onset atrial fibrillation. He also studies how best to use the electrocardiogram and imaging modalities using Machine Learning techniques to identify patients at risk for cardiovascular disease. Dr. Perez receives funding from the NIH/NHLBI, Apple Inc., Janssen and the Colson Foundation.

  • Alexander C. Perino

    Alexander C. Perino

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioAlexander C. Perino MD is a cardiac electrophysiologist, clinical informaticist, and cardiovascular researcher. In his clinical role, Dr. Perino treats patients with heart rhythm disorders at Stanford Health Care, performing catheter ablations and cardiac device implantations. In addition to complex ablation (e.g., atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia ablation), Dr. Perino has expertise implanting leadless pacemakers, subcutaneous ICDs, and conduction system pacing leads (i.e., His bundle and left bundle branch area pacing leads). Dr. Perino is the medical informatics director for the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford Health Care, providing informatics direction to improve 1) the quality and safety of cardiovascular care delivery and 2) patient and clinician experience derived from the electronic health record and related information and communication technologies. As a cardiovascular researcher, Dr. Perino uses large datasets to examine quality of care, outcomes, and risk prediction for heart rhythm disorders and cardiovascular disease.

  • Richard Popp

    Richard Popp

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAcademic-Industrial relations; Ethics of invention.