School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 46 Results

  • Jack Percelay

    Jack Percelay

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    BioJack Percelay has a 25+ year career in pediatric hospital medicine, beginning before the term hospitalist was invented when he started as an "in-house pediatrician in 1991 at several Bay Area hospitals after a brief career as a civilian primary care pediatrician at local and international US military bases. He has spent the majority of his career in community hospitals where his practice has run the gamut from the general pediatric ward and emergency room, to the PICU and intensive care nurseries, delivery room, and specialized neurologic and neurosurgical units. His work has taken him from San Francisco to New York City with brief stints in Hawaii. In 2015 he moved to Seattle Children's Hospital where he was an Associate Division Chief of Hospital Medicine, and in 2018 returned to the Bay Area joining the Stanford faculty.

    He served as the founding chair of the AAP Section on Hospital Medicine, and has also served as the Chair of the AAP Committee on Hospital Care. He served for seven years as the pediatric board member for the Society of Hospital Medicine and has been recognized as a Master of Hospital Medicine by SHM. Additionally, he was an inaugural board member of the American Board of Pediatrics Pediatric Hospital Medicine Subspecialty Board. Areas of interest include pediatric hospital medicine systems of care, patient and family-centered care, BRUEs, billing and coding, and hospitalist roles in the PICU.

  • Martin Pfaller

    Martin Pfaller

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioMartin R. Pfaller is an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics (Cardiology) in the group of Alison L. Marsden. He received his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Munich, working with Wolfgang A. Wall. During his Ph.D., he validated an efficient yet physiologically accurate boundary condition to account for the mechanical support of the heart within its surroundings, which has been adopted by various research groups worldwide. He further demonstrated how projection-based model order reduction could speed up model personalization from patient data, such as magnetic resonance imaging or blood pressure measurements. His current work focuses on cardiovascular fluid dynamics. He developed reduced-physics models to make blood flow simulations faster and more reliable. Further, he developed a fluid-solid-growth interaction model in blood vessels. His future research will predict the heart’s long-term function in heart diseases, supported by an NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) and Stanford MCHRI Instructor K Award Support. He will quantify the risk of heart failure after a heart attack with a stability analysis validated with imaging data in swine and humans. This research will improve our understanding of biomechanical mechanisms leading to heart failure and help to identify patients at risk, enable personalized therapies, and facilitate the optimal design of medical devices. As an Assistant Professor, Martin will start his research group at Yale University in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in July 2024.

  • Trung Hoang Minh Pham

    Trung Hoang Minh Pham

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUncovering mechanisms of tissue immunity and immunophysiology during persistent infection

    The immune system safeguards the health of complex organisms by rapidly eliminating invading pathogens, curbing infection-induced tissue disruptions, and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Many bacterial pathogens evade host antimicrobial mechanisms and persist in infected tissues at low levels for long periods of time even in the presence of innate and adaptive immune resistance. During persistent infection, the immune system simultaneously orchestrates antimicrobial responses to contain the pathogen, repairs damaged tissue, regulates nutrient resources, and maintains other tissue physiologic functions to ensure host survival. Failure of any of these tasks leads to uncontrolled infection, devastating disease, and even death. The goals of our research are to understand:

    1)What are the innate and adaptive immune cellular mechanisms that contain pathogens during persistent infection?
    2)How are tissue physiological functions, such as tissue repair and nutrient regulation, maintained during persistent infection?
    3)How do pathogens survive innate and adaptive antimicrobial mechanisms in infected tissues?
    4)How does persistent infection impact host immunity to secondary infections of a similar or different pathogen?

    Through investigating these fundamental questions, we may be able to decode the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that can be harnessed to eradicate infections, promote tissue resilience, and restore health after an infectious insult. We employ animal infection models and bring together immunology, tissue biology, microbiology, and genetics to uncover the mechanisms of tissue immunity and immunophysiology during persistent infection from the molecular to organismal level.

    Current areas of research:
    •Development, maintenance, and plasticity of macrophage functional diversity in infected tissue
    •Tissue repair and nutrient regulation during persistent infection
    •Cellular dynamics and bacterial persistence in lymphoid organs

    We are looking for highly motivated team members who are passionate about making impactful scientific discoveries to join our group at all levels. For opportunities and positions available for pre-doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows, please contact tpham8@stanford.edu!

  • Benjamin Pinsky

    Benjamin Pinsky

    Professor of Pathology, of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and application of molecular assays for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

  • Maryann Abiodun Pitts, MD

    Maryann Abiodun Pitts, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioDr. Pitts is a board-certified pediatrician. She has served as a clinical instructor and assistant clinical professor (affiliated) in the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She provides care to children and adolescents. Among the services she delivers are well check-ups, vaccinations, acute care, mental health support, and preventive care.

    When patients meet with Dr. Pitts, it is important to her that they always feel respected and heard. If they are not ready or able to answer a question, or if they feel more at ease with a different approach to their appointment, she will always honor how they are feeling.

    Dr. Pitts also works with the community to strengthen the systems that support healthy children and families. She has extensive experience collaborating with community-based organizations and government agencies. Her experience includes serving as a physician partner to the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Aware Initiative. This program develops methods to screen patients and create treatment plans designed to help them heal from the impacts of trauma and toxic stress.

    Her leadership experience includes co-founding POWER: Pediatricians Organizing and Working to End Racism and developing diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives within health institutions. As an invited speaker at regional and national events, she has made many presentations to her peers. She also served as a health equity panelist for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

    Dr. Pitts speaks both English and Spanish.

  • Terry Platchek

    Terry Platchek

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Platchek's research interest focuses on improving value in healthcare delivery using healthcare model design thinking and a "Lean" business strategy. Dr. Platchek is also interested in effective methods for engaging clinicians in systems-based clinical improvement efforts.

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Sutardja Chuk Professor of Definitive and Curative Medicine

    BioDr. Porteus was raised in California and was a local graduate of Gunn High School before completing A.B. degree in “History and Science” at Harvard University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and wrote an thesis entitled “Safe or Dangerous Chimeras: The recombinant DNA controversy as a conflict between differing socially constructed interpretations of recombinant DNA technology.” He then returned to the area and completed his combined MD, PhD at Stanford Medical School with his PhD focused on understanding the molecular basis of mammalian forebrain development with his PhD thesis entitled “Isolation and Characterization of TES-1/DLX-2: A Novel Homeobox Gene Expressed During Mammalian Forebrain Development.” After completion of his dual degree program, he was an intern and resident in Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and then completed his Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship in the combined Boston Chidlren’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute program. For his fellowship and post-doctoral research he worked with Dr. David Baltimore at MIT and CalTech where he began his studies in developing homologous recombination as a strategy to correct disease causing mutations in stem cells as definitive and curative therapy for children with genetic diseases of the blood, particularly sickle cell disease. Following his training with Dr. Baltimore, he took an independent faculty position at UT Southwestern in the Departments of Pediatrics and Biochemistry before again returning to Stanford in 2010 as an Associate Professor. During this time his work has been the first to demonstrate that gene correction could be achieved in human cells at frequencies that were high enough to potentially cure patients and is considered one of the pioneers and founders of the field of genome editing—a field that now encompasses thousands of labs and several new companies throughout the world. His research program continues to focus on developing genome editing by homologous recombination as curative therapy for children with genetic diseases but also has interests in the clonal dynamics of heterogeneous populations and the use of genome editing to better understand diseases that affect children including infant leukemias and genetic diseases that affect the muscle. Clinically, Dr. Porteus attends at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital where he takes care of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • Allison Pribnow

    Allison Pribnow

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSolid Tumors, Bone Sarcomas, Global Oncology, Health Disparities

  • James Priest

    James Priest

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Priest lab seeks a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of congenital heart disease using translational genomics, big-data, and vertebrate models of cardiac development.

  • Lance Prince

    Lance Prince

    Philip Sunshine, MD, Professor of Neonatology

    BioLawrence (Lance) S. Prince, MD, PhD, is the Division Chief for Neonatal and Developmental Medicine at Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Prince was previously a Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Neonatology at the University of California, San Diego and Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego.

    Dr. Prince has a long and distinguished career mentoring clinical and scientific trainees and students, many of whom have gone on to establish their own successful careers as academic physician investigators. As a physician scientist, Dr. Prince leads a basic science laboratory focusing on the mechanisms regulating developmental immunology and lung injury and repair. Dr. Prince received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from University of Miami, an MD/PhD with a focus in Cell Biology from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and postdoctoral fellowship, Pediatrics residency, and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship training at the University of Iowa. Before arriving in California, Dr. Prince was an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University.

    Dr. Prince’s research interests include the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling lung development and the maturation of the fetal and neonatal immune systems. He has a particular clinical interest in managing and treating neonatal lung diseases, especially bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in babies born extremely preterm. Dr. Prince’s research team focuses primarily on the development of innate immunity during fetal life as it impacts health and disease in preterm infants. The laboratory is investigating how microbes including Group B streptococcus exploit the unique features of neonatal macrophages to avoid immune detection and cause disease, as well as leading a number of clinical and translational investigations.

  • Charles G. Prober, MD

    Charles G. Prober, MD

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of infections in children. Much of this research has focused on viral infections, especially those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). I have conducted a number of studies concerned with the epidemiology of HSV-2 infections in pregnant women, their partners, and neonates.