School of Medicine


Showing 51-76 of 76 Results

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Michal Bental Roof

    Michal Bental Roof

    Academic Prog Prof 3, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Role at StanfordI joined the Cardiopulmonary Research Program of Drs. Rabinovitch and Bland at Stanford University in 2002, as the Academic and Research Program Officer, and since 2020 assumed my role at the Basic Science and Engineering (BASE) Initiative at the Betty Irene Moore Children's Heart Center, directed by Dr. Rabinovitch. I organize the educational activities of the lab, and assist the faculty and fellows with the preparation of grant proposals, IRB, APLAC and Biosafety protocols, manuscripts, and presentations. I served as the Site Coordinator for the Stanford Transplant Procurement Center of the Pulmonary Hypertension Breakthrough Initiative (PHBI), headed by Dr. Rabinovitch,that now evolved into the Stanford Transplant Tissue Bank. In this capacity, I oversee patient recruitment, data collection and reporting, and ensure compliance with university and federal guidelines. I coordinated and prepared the application for an Investigational New Drug (IND) and the pre-IND meeting that preceded that, for Elafin as a therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) to the FDA in August 2017, and with the Study PIs coordinated the Phase 1 clinical trial “Safety and Tolerability of Escalating Doses of Subcutaneous Elafin (Tiprelestat) Injection in Healthy Normal Subjects” that followed.

    From 2005-2015, I served as the Administrative Coordinator of the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Science Scholarly Concentration for medical students at Stanford University School of Medicine. This includes facilitating communication of the four co-Directors with the School of Medicine Administration, the medical students, and the faculty mentors. An important component of this role is the coordination of the MED223 course, a medical school course where faculty and fellows present new developments in cardiovascular science in the form of a journal club. From 2013-2018, I was the coordinator for the NIH-NHLBI T32 “Mechanisms and Innovation in Vascular Disease” (PI: RL Dalman), and from 2013 to date for NIH-NHLBI K12 HL120001 “Stanford Career Development Program in ‘Omics’ of Lung Disease”. (PIs: M Rabinovitch, MR Nicolls and MP Snyder). This included recruitment of candidates, oversight of training activities, ensuring compliance with NIH and Stanford policies, and acting as a liaison between the trainees and the Directors to facilitate effective communication.

    Prior to joining Stanford, I was Associate Director (Scientific Development Administrator) at the Institute for Medicine and Engineering, directed by Dr. Peter Davies at the University of Pennsylvania. In this role, I was the liaison with federal funding agencies and organized multi-investigator program projects and training grants.

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement, Co-Director of Community-Engaged Research for the Office of Cancer Health Equity, and Director of the Outreach, Recruitment and Engagement Core for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Stanford University Endowed Professor for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician scientist, who has been devoted to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research since beginning medical training over 20 years ago. I am also Director of the Stanford Center for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease. I have expertise crossing mucosal immunology and epithelial biology, formal training and experience in clinical and translational investigation with human biospecimens, and direct insight regarding the important clinical challenges caring for children with complicated IBD. My translational research program focuses on how the immune system regulates epithelial function in chronic intestinal inflammation as it relates to IBD. My clinical research program has focused on optimization of anti-TNF therapy in pediatric IBD, and in particular acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC). My laboratory has demonstrated a protective role for IL33, a cytokine that induces type 2 cytokines from T cells an innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), in acute oxazolone colitis through preservation of epithelial goblet cells and barrier function. In line with this finding, we have also shown in a large prospective patient cohort that mucosal expression of type 2 and type 17 immune response genes distinguishes ulcerative colitis (UC) from colon-only Crohn’s disease, and that type 2 gene expression is associated with superior clinical outcome in pediatric UC. We have now developed an organoid-immune cell in vitro culture system to demonstrate the ILC2-dependent mechanism through which IL33 induces goblet cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium. I led the multicenter study Anti-TNF for Refractory Colitis in Hospitalized Children (ARCH) Study, which aims to establish determinants of anti-TNF response in pediatric ASUC and currently Co-Chair the Crohn's & Colitis Foundations Cohort for Pediatric Translational and Clinical Research in IBD (CAPTURE IBD) and PRO-KIIDS Pediatric IBD clinical research network.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Charlene Larson Rotandi

    Charlene Larson Rotandi

    Associate Director of Fellowship Education, Pediatrics

    BioI am currently the Associate Director of Fellowship Education in the Office of Pediatric Education. Most recently, I was the Department Fellowship Manager for the Department of Pediatrics, and prior to that I was the Fellowship and Postdoctoral Administrator in the Department of Pediatrics, Hematology/Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Other positions I have held included Pediatric Residency Coordinator for Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University and the Graduate Medical Education Coordinator for the Department of OB/GYN and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco.

    I am actively engaged in the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD), currently serving on the Mentoring Work Group for the Coordinators’ Executive Committee. I’ve collaborated on a number of scholarly activities with fellow APPD colleagues in the area of professional empowerment and advancement of coordinators, coordinator wellness, program evaluation committees and annual program evaluations, clinical competency committees and milestones, as well as presented a fellow/faculty development workshop on milestones and assessment tools for our division. I continue to seek out opportunities to collaborate, mentor, and take on leadership positions.

    Outside of graduate medical education, I am the mother of a very active and curious seven year-old. I also enjoy spending time with my family exploring the Bay Area, hiking, cooking, and enjoying food and wine and the vibrant arts culture. A brief stint as a pastry cook, I love to cook and bake with my son. Additionally, I continue to be involved in my alma mater, Vassar College, by co-chairing the Vassar Alumnae/i Admissions Program in San Francisco.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRandomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.

  • Christopher John Russell

    Christopher John Russell

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hospital Medicine)

    BioDr. Russell is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine and a board-certified academic pediatric hospitalist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. His clinical responsibilities include caring for children hospitalized for a variety of illnesses. His research focuses on developing evidence-based care for hospitalized children with medical complexity, including acute respiratory infections (such as pneumonia and bacterial tracheitis). His research efforts have been recognized through receipt of the University of Southern California’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute’s KL2 Mentored Research Career Development Award (2014-16), the Academic Pediatric Association’s Young Investigator Award (2015-16), the NIH Loan Repayment Program (2017-2021) and a large grant from the Gerber Foundation (2020-2022). In August 2021, he received a five-year R01 award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study bacterial respiratory infections in child with tracheostomy. Outside of his clinical and research responsibilities, Dr. Russell focuses on research mentorship of medical students, pediatric residents, and pediatric hospital medicine fellows as well as improving representation of underrepresented minorities in medicine throughout the continuum of physician training. Dr. Russell is the chair of the Academic Pediatric Association’s Membership, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee and is on the Executive Committee for the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings research network. Dr. Russell is active in the AAP and currently serves as an Associate Editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics.