School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 93 Results

  • Raya Saab

    Raya Saab

    Lindhard Family Professor of Pediatric Cancer Biology

    BioOur laboratory focuses on investigating molecular mechanisms of oncogene-induced tumorigenesis and tumor suppressor pathways, and oncogenic signaling in the pediatric solid tumor rhabdomyosarcoma. Our earlier work identified the tumor suppressors p53 and p18Ink4c as inhibitors of Cyclin D1-driven tumorigenesis in a pineoblastoma model, through senescence induction, and highlighted distinct roles for the the RB and p53 pathways in induction and maintenance of oncogene-induced senescence. We also identified CDK2 as a potential target for inducing senescence in premalignant lesions to inhibit tumor progression.
    Our current focus is on studying oncogenic signaling and tumor suppression in the childhood tumor rhabdomyosarcoma, to identify key mediators of invasion and metastasis, which is the most common cause of treatment failure clinically. We use preclinical in vitro and in vivo models, including murine and human cell lines, and mouse models of disease.
    We have recently uncovered a paracrine role for rhabdomyosarcoma-secreted exosomes in impacting biology of stromal cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma-derived exosomes carry specific miRNA cargo that imparts an invasive and migratory phenotype on normal recipient fibroblasts, and proteomic analysis revealed specific and unique pathways relevant to the two different molecular rhabdomyosarcoma subtypes that are driven by distinct oncogenic pathways. We identified that the driver oncogene in fusion-positive rhabdomyosarcoma, PAX3-FOXO1, modulates exosome cargo to promote invasion, migration, and angiogenic properties, and identified specific microRNA and protein cargo acting as effectors of PAX3-FOXO1 exosome-mediated signaling, including modulation of oxidative stress response and cell survival signaling.
    Our ongoing work is focused on interrogating specific paracrine signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms of metastatic disease progression in rhabdomyosarcoma, for potential therapeutic targeting.

  • Rebecca Saenz

    Rebecca Saenz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Immunology and Allergy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAllergy, Immunology, Bioengineering and Biodesign

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Debbie C. Sakaguchi Sakai

    Debbie C. Sakaguchi Sakai

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education, shared decision making, resuscitation.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Christy Sandborg

    Christy Sandborg

    Professor of Pediatrics (Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major emphasis of my work in the past 2 decades has been focused on the future of academic pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology through providing training, research opportunities and environments to nurture and challenge future pediatric rheumatologists and subspecialists. In parallel in the last decade, my scope has included to workforce and physician wellbring, patient and family centered care--and more recently, diversity, equity and inclusion, and health equity.

  • Kelly Corbett Sanders

    Kelly Corbett Sanders

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioDr. Kelly Sanders is a Stanford pediatrician and the Technical Lead of the Pandemic Response Initiative at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Institute for Global Health Sciences. She completed a Master of Science and Doctor of Medicine at the University of San Francisco, California, and pediatrics residency training at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University. Before pursuing a career as a physician, Dr. Sanders worked with the UCSF Global Health Group’s Malaria Elimination Initiative (MEI) on operational research projects with partner countries, as well as on developing communications and advocacy priorities with MEI and global partners. Previously, she worked with the UCSF Institute for Global Health Sciences, supporting the creation of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and the UC Global Health Institute. In addition to her work at UCSF, Dr. Sanders practices clinically as a pediatrician at Stanford University, Palo Alto Medical Foundation and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center.

  • Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH

    Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics), of Health Policy and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct interdisciplinary research to understand literacy as potentially modifiable lens for addressing maternal and child health disparities from birth through early adulthood. Applying mixed methods approaches (health-services, epidemiology, ethnography), I have been principal investigator on extramurally-funded research projects (NIH, PCORI, FDA) that aim to examine "natural experiments" in policy and/or to design, implement and test novel system-level interventions.

  • Meera N. Sankar

    Meera N. Sankar

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPDA in premature infants
    Transcutaneous bilirubin use in the NICU Setting

  • Chethan Sarabu

    Chethan Sarabu

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioChethan Sarabu, MD trained in landscape architecture, pediatrics, and clinical informatics builds anastomoses across these fields to design healthier environments and systems. He is a clinical assistant professor of Pediatrics at Stanford Medicine, Director of Clinical Informatics at Sharecare. Across these roles, he works on designing and implementing a wide array of innovations ranging from patient portals, EHR transformation, virtual clinical trials, and A.I. driven digital biomarkers, to health information policy initiatives all through a lens of health equity and patient privacy.

    He takes care of patients in a community based academic general pediatrics practice at the Gardner Packard Clinic, a Federally Qualified Health Center, where he has also assisted with EHR implementation and transition. He cares deeply on involving children in their own care and strongly focused on protecting the privacy and confidentiality of adolescents in an increasingly digital healthcare system. He helped to form and co-chair the national workgroup, Shift which has been working to promote equitable interoperability.

    Drawing on his background in landscape architecture, Chethan implements and researches nature based health solutions in collaboration with the Stanford Natural Capital Project. Finally, further exploring the role of environment and human health, he is shaping the emergent field of climate health informatics.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Sarnquist focuses on applied teaching and research on the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to decrease gender-based violence and prevent HIV infection, especially among adolescents and children. She is particularly interested in rights-based approaches that tackle the complex interplay of factors that lead to poor health for many children and families. All of her work is applied, with direct links health practice and policy, and usually performed in conjunction with non-governmental organization and government partners. She works both globally and in the U.S., with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. She is also a medical educator, directing the scholarly concentrations program of the pediatric residency at Stanford, and co-directing the global health concentration for residents

  • Andrew Saunders

    Andrew Saunders

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Saunders (he/him) is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, and the medical director of the Pediatric Hospitalist Program at SHC Tri-Valley. His academic interests include diversity, equity, and inclusion in medicine; LGBTQIA+ health; ethics in technology; global health; medical education; public health; and physician wellness.

  • Michael Scahill

    Michael Scahill

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioOn a trip to Mozambique while in med school here at Stanford, I saw the power of market interventions to improve population health. In Pediatric Leadership for the Underserved residency at UCSF, I helped Jacaranda Health establish their pediatric clinic in Nairobi. Now, I split my time between the Stanford NICU and Virta, where I direct the digitally delivered diabetes reversal clinic.

  • David Scheinker

    David Scheinker

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioDavid Scheinker is the Executive Director of Systems Design and Collaborative Research at the Stanford Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. He is the Founder and Director of SURF Stanford Medicine, a group that brings together students and faculty from the university with physicians, nurses, and administrators from the hospitals. SURF has implemented and published dozens of projects demonstrating improvements to the quality and efficiency of care. His areas of focus include clinical care delivery, technical improvements to hospital operations, sensor-based and algorithm-enabled telemedicine, and the socioeconomic factors that shape healthcare cost and quality.

    Before coming to Stanford, he was a Joint Research Fellow at The MIT Sloan School of Management and Massachusetts General Hospital. He received a PhD in theoretical math from The University of California San Diego under Jim Agler. He advises Carta Healthcare, a healthcare analytics company started by former students.