School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 51 Results

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)
    On Partial Leave from 09/15/2021 To 03/14/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls.

  • Gregory Lee Sahlem

    Gregory Lee Sahlem

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioDr.Sahlem is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is board-certified in general psychiatry and addictions medicine, as well as fellowship-trained in the research and clinical application of neuromodulation-based treatments including repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). He additionally has advanced training in the treatment of mood and sleep disorders. In addition to being an active clinician, Dr.Sahlem is a member of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab and directs the Addictions Research Section of the Lab.

    Major areas of study for Dr.Sahlem include: The development of rTMS as a focused treatment for addictive disorders; the development of a novel form of ECT theorized to have reduced cognitive side effects, Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST), and; the further development of rTMS for the treatment of mood disorders.

  • Khalid Salaheldin, MD

    Khalid Salaheldin, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKhalid Salaheldin, MD serves as Clinical Assistant Professor and psychiatrist at the INSPIRE Early Psychosis Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Salaheldin specializes in the management of individuals presenting with first episode psychosis and early psychosis.

    Dr. Salaheldin’s work as academic chief resident at Northwell Health prior coming to Stanford, focused on piloting a consult liaison service for first episode psychosis that compassionately assists patients and their families from once they enter the emergency room, through their inpatient admission and into the outpatient setting.

    His current work at Stanford spans evaluating patients in the INSPIRE clinic, inpatient psychiatric unit, and the interventional psychiatry services; alongside teaching, research, and continuing to learn from his patients & colleagues.

    His treatment philosophy is a holistic approach evaluating vital underlying factors alongside pharmacotherapy & neuromodulatory interventions including: sleep, exercise, nutrition, mindfulness, therapy integration, underlying medical issues, substance use, psychosocial history, and importantly patients’ current relationships (including pets of course!). His approach focuses on meeting patients where they are at in their health journey, aligning treatment with their personal goals, and being actively present in their management.

    Dr. Salaheldin’s research interests include early psychosis interventions, underlying medical causes of psychiatric symptoms, neuromodulation, young adult mental health, community/global mental health, spirituality and mental health, and novel psychiatric therapeutics.

    We kindly request that patients do their best to provide the clinic with their previous blood work, imaging reports and medical history paperwork prior to the appointment in order to have the most complete initial evaluation.

  • Katherine Sanborn

    Katherine Sanborn

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr Katherine Sanborn specializes in the treatment of psychiatric inpatients. She has practiced Psychiatry for more than 15 years. Dr. Sanborn has a special interests in residency education, psychotherapy training, administration and developmental psychopathology.

  • Gisela Sandoval

    Gisela Sandoval

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research

    BioDr. Gisela Sandoval is a physician scientist with dual board certification who specializes in medical-psychiatric illness caring for individuals that suffer from medical conditions at the interface of medicine and psychiatry, which often requires complex chronic care. In addition she treats children with a broad range of psychiatric disorders including neurodevelopmental disorders, ADHD and mood and anxiety disorders in adolescents. She has a thorough and comprehensive way to approach her patients; she considers not only the clinical symptoms but also the impact of the family structure and the functioning of the child at school. Dr. Sandoval has a special interest in establishing standard of care guidelines to address the needs of chronically ill children to promote healthy habits and medical treatment compliance that promote health and decrease the burden of chronic medical and psychiatric illness.
    Dr. Sandoval graduated with honors from the California Institute of Technology where she performed research in brain physiology and evolution. She earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School where she also completed a Ph.D. specializing in molecular neurobiology and genetics. Dr. Sandoval completed her residency in general psychiatry at the University of Chicago, during which she received the NIMH Outstanding Resident Award. She went on to complete a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency of Columbia and Cornell Universities. After training she became the Clinical Director of the Warren Wright Adolescent Center at Northwestern University developing a successful clinical program focused on early identification and intervention for adolescents at risk of mental illness before moving to Stanford.
    Dr. Sandoval scientific interests focus on understanding the molecular, neurophysiological and neural circuits that are responsible for healthy brain development and behavior and understanding how these are altered in the developmental neuropsychiatric disorders resulting in pathological behaviors with the expectation that that could lead to new treatments. Furthermore, she is interested in identifying quantifiable metrics of behavior to better diagnosis mental illness by exploring the use of physical activity monitors to help assess the effectiveness of medical therapies.

  • Vidushi Savant

    Vidushi Savant

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Neurosciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural networks and AI for behavioral health applications

  • Alan F. Schatzberg

    Alan F. Schatzberg

    Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiological bases of depressive disorders;, glucocorticoid/dopamine interactions in delusional depression;, pharmacologic treatment of depressive disorders.

  • Mariana Schmajuk

    Mariana Schmajuk

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Neurosciences

    BioMariana Schmajuk received her medical school education at Boston University School of Medicine in 2012. She completed her General Adult Psychiatry Residency program Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in 2016, serving as Chief Resident with a focus on the early transition from medical school to residency. She went on to complete her Consult-Liaison fellowship at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Medical Center in 2017.

    Dr. Schmajuk joined Stanford University CLP team in 2017. She is a primary member of the emergency medicine consultations, working collaboratively with a nurse practioner, social worker and residents. Clinically, Dr. Schmajuk focuses on treating patients with terminal neurological disorders and oncological processes. Dr. Schmajuk is the director of the Psychosomatic Continuity clinic where residents and fellows are able to assess and longitudinally treat patients with psychiatric sequela in the context of complex medical illness. She has a particular interest in brief psychotherapeutic interventions. She enjoys teaching medical students about CL psychiatry and interviewing skills. At present, Dr. Schmajuk is using techniques of applied improvisation to educate psychiatry residents and others about the building blocks of communication. She also is an active member of the bioethics committee.

  • Shebani Sethi Dalai MD

    Shebani Sethi Dalai MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving metabolic and mental health through dietary interventions, pharmacological optimization, and other lifestyle means in those with severe mental illness, such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia is a major focus of her research. Clinical and academic interests are also in the management of psychiatric disorders with co-morbid obesity, poor metabolic health and/or eating disorders, particularly binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa.

  • Nirao Shah

    Nirao Shah

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator), of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how our brains generate social interactions that differ between the sexes. Such gender differences in behavior are regulated by sex hormones, experience, and social cues. Accordingly, we are characterizing how these internal and external factors control gene expression and neuronal physiology in the two sexes to generate behavior. We are also interested in understanding how such sex differences in the healthy brain translate to sex differences in many neuro-psychiatric illnesses.

  • Ripal Shah

    Ripal Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Neurosciences

    BioRipal Shah, M.D., M.P.H. is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences. She specializes clinically in reproductive psychiatry (the Women's Wellness Clinic - pre-conception, pregnancy, postpartum, breastfeeding, fertility, PMDD, reproductive and sexual health disorders), lifestyle and integrative approaches to health (the Stanford Center for Integrative Medicine - vitamins, minerals, supplements, exercise, behavioral modifications), and in physician wellness (the WellConnect program - serving Stanford resident/fellow/faculty physicians).

    Her research areas of focus are on women's reproductive psychiatry, integrative approaches to mental health, diversity & inclusion program development, the intersection of race and sexuality, ethnicity-dependent variability in mental health access and treatment response, and minority stress. Outside of consultations, she specializes in psychotherapy for minority populations, particularly those struggling with issues related to identity (religious identification, racial/ethnic minority stress, racial trauma, professional transitions, changes in family structure or relational status, sexual orientation), as well as cognitive-behavioral therapy for ADHD and anxiety disorders.

    While in training at Stanford, she served as Chief Resident and led Community Partnerships and Diversity & Inclusion efforts. She consistently ranked #1 in the Stanford residency (and top 1% in the nation) on the annual knowledge-based examination (PRITE). She is a Disaster Mental Health Responder both domestically and internationally, most recently in California after the wildfires, in Florida after Hurricane Irma and Maria, and in Kathmandu following the Nepal earthquake. She founded and led the Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council (DIAC) for psychiatry faculty and residents which is now a model organization for training programs across the country, built and then graduated from a Diversity & Health Equity track in the residency training program, and created the first known Diversity & Health Equity Grand Rounds series. She served as Chair of the Chief Residents’ Council, representing over a thousand physicians to the Stanford Health Care leadership. Before her time at Stanford, she completed an M.P.H. at the Harvard School of Public Health in Health Care Management and Policy, an M.D. from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and a B.S. from Duke University in Economics and Biochemistry. She is board certified in Adult Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. She pursued additional training in the fields of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, which has informed her evidence-based approach to integrative medicine.

  • Richard J. Shaw, M.D.

    Richard J. Shaw, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child & Adolescent Psychiatry) &, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPsychological issues in medically ill children.
    Medical posttraumatic stress disorder.
    Treatment adherence.
    Transplant psychiatry.
    Pediatric oncology.
    Forensic psychiatry.

  • Javaid I. Sheikh

    Javaid I. Sheikh

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on studying phenomenology, vulnerability factors, and psychiatric and medical comorbidity of panic disorder in old age, as well as treatment responses to medication in elders with panic disorder. I am presently involved in establishing and extending our preliminary finding that Late-Onset Panic Disorder (LOPD) (onset at or after age 55) is a phenomenologically distinct syndrome from Early-Onset Panic Disorder (EOPD).

  • Yelizaveta Sher

    Yelizaveta Sher

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Sher received her BA from UC Berkeley and MD from Washington University in St. Louis. She completed Residency in Psychiatry and Fellowship in Psychosomatic Medicine at Stanford University Medical Center. She has been a part of Psychosomatic Medicine Faculty at Stanford since 2013. Her areas of clinical and research interests include psychiatric comorbidities in patients with pulmonary disorders. In particular, she specializes in mental health of patients with cystic fibrosis as well as lung and heart transplant patients. She consults on patients hospitalized on medical and surgical units as well as sees patients in outpatient clinics. She serves as a Mental Health Coordinator for the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Clinic.