School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 64 Results

  • Michael Salerno

    Michael Salerno

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    BioDr. Salerno completed his BS in Biological Engineering at Cornell University, and his MD and PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program. He then completed the American Board of Internal Medicine Research Pathway with an Internal Medicine residency at Stanford University, and his general cardiology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. During his time at Duke he completed a dedicated year in cardiovascular MRI at the Duke Cardiovascular MR Imaging Center. He returned to UVA in 2008 to complete a 2-year advanced cardiovascular imaging fellowship where he trained in CMR and cardiovascular CTA. He achieved COCATS Level III training in all cardiovascular imaging modalities (Echo, Nuclear, CMR, CCT), and is board certified in Echocardiography and Nuclear Cardiology. He served as faculty at UVA in Cardiology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering from 2010-2021 where he was the Director of Cardiac MRI and the Medical Director of Echocardiography, before returning to Stanford.

    His research involves the development and evaluation of novel MRI pulse sequences and techniques to improve the clinical utility of CMR imaging. The current focus of the research is on quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging, quantitative imaging of myocardial fibrosis, rapid free-breathing and self-gated imaging, and deep learning for image reconstruction and post-processing. His laboratory includes undergraduate and graduate engineering students as well as clinical cardiovascular imaging fellows to bring new advances into clinical practice. Dr. Salerno has been in the field of MRI for 25 years and holds multiple patents related to the development and application of novel pulse sequences for MRI. He has received numerous research awards, and has published extensively in the areas of MRI, cardiovascular MRI and multi-modality cardiovascular imaging. His research has been supported by the AHA and the National Institutes of health. He is a deputy editor for JACC Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Outside of work, Dr. Salerno enjoys sailing, rock climbing, skiing, running, biking, hiking, and spending time with his wife Cherie, and his two boys Christopher and Joseph.

  • Karim Sallam, MD

    Karim Sallam, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioKarim Sallam, MD, is trained in Cardiovascular Medicine and Advanced Heart Failure.

  • Darren Salmi

    Darren Salmi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular pathology, congenital heart disease, autopsy, medical education

  • Jacinda Sampson

    Jacinda Sampson

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Jacinda Sampson received her MD and a PhD in biochemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed her neurology residency and neurogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She served at Columbia University Medical Center prior to joining Stanford University Medical Center in 2015. Her areas of interest include myotonic dystrophies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurogenetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis, hereditary spastic paraparesis, spinocerebellar ataxia, among others. She is interested in clinical trials for treatment of neurogenetic disorders, and is the clinical application of next-generation genomic sequencing to genetic testing.

  • Alexander Tarlochan Singh Sandhu

    Alexander Tarlochan Singh Sandhu

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioAlex Sandhu, MD, MS is a cardiologist with a special interest in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He graduated from the seven-year combined BA-MD program at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine. He completed an internal medicine residency at Stanford University, spending 16 weeks at Makerere Hospital in Uganda as part of the Global Health track. He subsequently obtained completed a Masters in Health Services Research at Stanford while acting as a fellow in health services research at the Palo Alto VA and Stanford's Center for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research. Next, he completed fellowships in cardiology and advanced heart failure and transplant at Stanford before joining the faculty.

    Alex is now an active clinician and heart failure researcher who focuses on health economics, the implementation of high-value care strategies, and comparative effectiveness. He is involved in three clinical trials at this time: K-23 funded PRO-HF (patient centered quality of life assessments), DOT-HF (mobile device based implementation trial), and a CAC notification pilot trial (patient centered coronary artery calcification notification).

    In his free time, he enjoys entertaining and being entertained by his ebullient sons, Kyle and Tyler.

  • Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Sayed Laboratory is focused on the development of novel technologies that drive innovation in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug testing in vascular biology. The lab conducts translational research in vascular biology and aims to understand the role of the vasculature in the development of cardiac diseases, including those due to inherited genetic variants or environmental insults such as type 2 diabetes or hypertension. The lab employs the human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to generate patient-specific vascular cells (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells) as an alternative to animal models providing a human tissue surrogate for research that is scalable and sustainable. By employing this unique platform, the lab also investigates the role of chemotherapeutic agents (anti-cancer drugs) on the vasculature. Dr. Sayed’s lab has also established an endothelial regeneration program, where they leverage the innate immune system to regenerate endothelial cells from human fibroblasts.

    Work from the lab has led to seminal discoveries in the areas of 1) Nitric oxide (NO) biology, (2) vascular biology, (3) stem cell biology, (4) cardiovascular disease modeling (5) cardio-oncology.

  • Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research continues to be in the field of echocardiography. Several areas of research are currently being pursued.

  • Donald Schreiber

    Donald Schreiber

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research group focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies including acute myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure. We have evaluated novel cardiac markers and point-of-care testing in clinical practice. Current projects also include the diagnosis and treatment of acute pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. Other interests include spinal cord injury, pneumonia and sepsis.

  • John S. Schroeder, MD

    John S. Schroeder, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Clinical Pharmocology of Cardiovascular Drugs
    (a) Calcium Channel Blockers
    (b) Agents for Heart Failure
    (c) Anti-atherosclerotic Effects of Cardiovascular Drugs, e.g. Calcium Channel Blockers

    2. Cardiac Transplantation/Congestive Heart Failure

    3. Coronary Artery Spasm

  • Katharine Sears Edwards

    Katharine Sears Edwards

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPotential impact of brief behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, coping, medical adherence, and cardiovascular health among cardiac patients.

    Psychosocial challenges of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD).

    Assessment and training in evidence-based psychological therapies.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Associate Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • George Segall

    George Segall

    Professor of Radiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScintigraphic evaluation of coronary blood flow and myocardial function using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Tumor imaging and characterization of pulmonary nodules with PET/CT.

  • Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    BioI am a pediatric physician-scientist striving to advance cystic fibrosis clinical care and translational research. Clinically, I am focused on gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis, developing diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the gastrointestinal and liver health of those with cystic fibrosis. I also specialize in the clinical management of pediatric pancreatitis and am involved with the international INSPPIRE consortium to study pediatric pancreatitis. My research spans the entire spectrum across basic science and translational research to clinical research and trials. In the laboratory, my projects are centered around understanding mechanisms of ion transport in cystic fibrosis tissues and determining how loss of CFTR ion transport leads to pathologic changes in human physiology. We are also very interested in the pathophysiological relationship between pancreatitis and intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Our laboratory has expertise in epithelial ion transport, with specialized skills in the measurement of bicarbonate transport. We are also part of a Multi-PI collaboration pursuing CFTR gene editing and stem cell engraftment for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. We utilize a combination of immortalized and primary cell culture, organoids, mouse and human tissue, and whole animal in vivo studies.

  • Kinya Seo

    Kinya Seo

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Kinya Seo's primary research focus is on the determinants of myocardial function in the normal and diseased heart toward the goal for developing new therapies for heart failure. On a technical level, he possesses an unparalleled range of skills in molecular and cell biology, biomedical engineering, and model organisms research. He received his graduate training at the University of Tokyo, where he studied cardiac mechanics, electrophysiology, and computer simulation to investigate the mechanisms of arrhythmias induced by mechanical stimuli. After he received Ph.D., he moved to Baltimore to work in the laboratory of Dr. David Kass at Johns Hopkins University. He extended his skills and expertise toward the understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure with special focus on the influence of mechanical stimuli. After postdoctoral training, he went back to Japan working at Jichi Medical University as an assistant professor, where he developed intravital imaging technologies for cardiovascular events. These skills will allow him to extend his studies from cells to organs, and to human to perform translational study for heart diseases.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Rajan Lalit Shah

    Rajan Lalit Shah

    Affiliate, Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Rajan Shah is a cardiac electrophysiologist concentrating on the treatment of arrhythmias, especially those of complex origins. He prides himself on delivering personalized attention, compassion, and high-quality care to optimize the needs of his patients with abnormal heart rhythms. His experiences in Detroit, where he was raised, exposed him to a wide range of beautiful cultures and backgrounds, and solidified his decision to pursue a career focused on the wellbeing of people.

    He completed his sub-specialty fellowship at Stanford University where he received 2 years of highly specialized training dedicated to the treatment of genetic arrhythmia syndromes and management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Dr. Shah continues his profession at Stanford Health Care and is grateful for the opportunity to care for a diverse population, employing his expertise in state-of-the-art therapies including minimally-invasive catheter ablation (ex: ventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation) and device implantation (ex: conduction system and leadless pacing) to better the health outcomes of his patients with various arrhythmias. In his clinical role, Dr. Shah additionally directs the East Bay Familial Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic concentrated on the tailored-treatment of genetic arrhythmia syndromes and the prevention of sudden cardiac death in individuals and families.

  • Rahul P Sharma, MBBS, FRACP

    Rahul P Sharma, MBBS, FRACP

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranscatheter valve therapies, CT valve imaging, AI and device innovation

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn clinical research, Dr. Shrager studies outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, diaphragm plication, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    Dr. Shrager's lab is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Yasuhiro Shudo, MD, PhD

    Yasuhiro Shudo, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Shudo is a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the surgical treatment of end-stage cardiopulmonary failure, including heart transplant, heart-lung transplant, lung transplant, mechanical circulatory support (MCS), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). He has published numerous landmark papers
    and chapters.

    Dr. Shudo also performs mitral valve repair/replacement (MVR), aortic valve replacement (AVR), complex valve surgery, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, reoperative cardiac surgery, minimally invasive surgery, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

    Dr. Shudo is fully committed to innovative, comprehensive, and compassionate care for each patient he treats.

  • Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm dedicated to connecting patients with clinical research trials and contributing to research on specific skin conditions particularly hemangiomas, birthmarks, and PHACE syndrome. My research also aims to develop solutions to health disparities through improved access to pediatric dermatologists and treatments.

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Robert Simoni

    Robert Simoni

    Professor, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCholesterol in biological membranes; genetic mechanisms & cholesterol production

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Sulaiman Somani

    Sulaiman Somani

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Resident in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputer vision, personalized medicine, cardiology, clinical informatics

  • Ehab Sorial

    Ehab Sorial

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioGraduated from the University of Minya, Faculty of Medicine in Egypt. He completed his general surgery residency from Harbor–UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and Western Reserve Care system in Youngstown, Ohio 2015. He completed his fellowship training in vascular surgery at the University of Kentucky in Lexington in 2007. Dr. Sorial is board certified in both Vascular Surgery and General Surgery.

    He joined Stanford Vascular Surgery in 2015. He is currently Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Vascular Surgery. Dr. Sorial had previously served as an Assistant then an Associate Professor at the University of Kentucky from 2007 through 2015. Dr. Ehab Sorial is a staff surgeon at the Santa Clara Valley Medical center in San Jose CA.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease

  • Joshua M. Spin

    Joshua M. Spin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spin began his research career studying the structural biology of low density lipoprotein, and has been augmenting his skills with intensive training in molecular biology techniques, particularly those involving high-throughput genetic expression profiling. He is especially interested in vascular smooth muscle cells, and the role of smooth muscle differentiation and phenotypic switching in development and vascular disease. His latest work has focused on the biology of aortic aneurysms.

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.