School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 46 Results

  • Birgitt Schuele

    Birgitt Schuele

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pathology

    BioBirgitt Schüle, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on medical genetics and stem cell modeling to unlock disease mechanisms and pathways leading to neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, and to develop new therapeutic strategies to advance precision medicine.
    She received her medical training from the Georg-August University Göttingen and Medical University Lübeck, Germany (1993 - 2001) and completed doctoral degree in medicine (Dr. med.) in neurophysiology at the Georg-August University Göttingen (2001). During her neurology internship from 2001 to 2002 at Medical University of Lübeck with Prof. Christine Klein, Dr. Schüle studied genes for inherited forms of Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. From 2003 to 2005, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in human genetics with Prof. Uta Francke at Stanford University School of Medicine. From 2005-2019, Dr. Schüle led key clinical research programs and biospecimen repositories for neurogenetics, translational stem cell and brain donation at the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center.
    Dr. Schuele is the associate core leader of the Neuropathology Core with the Stanford Alzheimer Research Center (ADRC) and core leader of the Analytics Core for the Pacific Udall Center. She supports the centers with genetic characterization, biobanking, and building a human induced pluripotent stem cell and post-mortem leptomeninges tissue bank shared with the data and tissue repositories at NIH.

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group’s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Hua Shan

    Hua Shan

    Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Shan specializes in providing blood transfusion treatment to patients with diverse medical problems. She has been practicing transfusion medicine for over twenty five years. Dr. Shan currently serves as the Medical Director of Transfusion Service at Stanford Medical Center. Dr. Shan has also been leading research programs in the fields of transfusion safety, blood availability and optimazing clinical blood transfusion practice.

  • Jeanne Shen

    Jeanne Shen

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary pathology, with major emphasis on GI and pancreatic neoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, biodesign innovation, and the application of machine learning to digital pathology.

  • Kang Shen

    Kang Shen

    Professor of Biology and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe connectivity of a neuron (its unique constellation of synaptic inputs and outputs) is essential for its function. Neuronal connections are made with exquisite accuracy between specific types of neurons. How each neuron finds its synaptic partners has been a central question in developmental neurobiology. We utilize the relatively simple nervous system of nematode C. elegans, to search for molecules that can specify synaptic connections and understand the molecular mechanisms of synaptic as