School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 96 Results

  • Alan Schroeder

    Alan Schroeder

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Schroeder is the associate chief for research in the division of pediatric hospital medicine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and a clinical professor in the division of hospital medicine and the division of critical care. His research interests focus on identifying areas where we can “safely do less” in healthcare, striving to ensure that children get the healthcare that they need while avoiding excessive tests and treatments that only cause harm. Dr. Schroeder is currently involved in multiple projects involving common conditions and interventions in pediatrics. He serves as the Stanford PI for PEDSNet and is an Associate Editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics. At Stanford he co-leads the residency clinical research scholarly concentration and the faculty Clinical Research Peer Scholarship Community. Dr. Schroeder provides clinical care for children in the PICU and the pediatric ward.

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioI am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of naïve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of naïve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.

  • Christopher Thomas Scott, PhD

    Christopher Thomas Scott, PhD

    Sr Research Scholar, Pediatrics - Center for Biomedical Ethics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the political, legal, ethical and economic impacts of stem cell research. Topics include: embryonic and adult stem cell research and clinical trials, stem cell banking, human-animal chimeras; cell and gamete donation; international perspectives of bioethics; global economic impacts; national and state regulatory policy, stem cell entrepreneurship, intellectual property and offshore stem cell transplants.

  • Talal Seddik

    Talal Seddik

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTalal Seddik is a member of the Collaborative Antiviral Study Group. He is the key site investigator at the Stanford site for the following multicenter studies:

    1) DMID 19-0026 Enterovirus Study
    Neonatal Enterovirus and Human Parechovirus Viral Sepsis: Natural History and Predictors of Morbidity and Mortality

    This study will be the first large, multi-state prospective assessment of the viral causes of neonatal sepsis conducted. The main reason for this research study is to get a better understanding of what causes neonatal viral sepsis and to assess the impact of the infection on the babies’ health. Viruses called enterovirus (EV) or human parechovirus (HPeV) are very common in the population and can cause neonatal viral sepsis. By gaining a better understanding of the condition, we hope this information can be used to guide diagnosis and treatment of babies with neonatal viral sepsis in the future.

    This study is actively enrolling subjects

    2) DMID 19-0005 Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) Study
    A Prospective Study of Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) to Define Natural History, Risk Factors and Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    Patients with suspected AFM (onset of flaccid limb weakness within the previous 30 days) are eligible to enroll in the study. Investigators will assess participants at four-time points within the first month of enrollment and will ask participants to return for additional follow up visits at 3 months, 7 months and 1 year. Neurologic improvements will be tracked over time, and samples will be collected and stored in a biorepository for use in future research studies. Household contacts, such as siblings, will be eligible to participate in the study as a control or comparison group.

    This study is actively enrolling subjects.

  • Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    BioI am a pediatric physician-scientist striving to advance cystic fibrosis clinical care and translational research. Clinically, I am focused on gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis, developing diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the gastrointestinal and liver health of those with cystic fibrosis. I also specialize in the clinical management of pediatric pancreatitis and am involved with the international INSPPIRE consortium to study pediatric pancreatitis. My research spans the entire spectrum across basic science and translational research to clinical research and trials. In the laboratory, my projects are centered around understanding mechanisms of ion transport in cystic fibrosis tissues and determining how loss of CFTR ion transport leads to pathologic changes in human physiology. We are also very interested in the pathophysiological relationship between pancreatitis and intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Our laboratory has expertise in epithelial ion transport, with specialized skills in the measurement of bicarbonate transport. We are also part of a Multi-PI collaboration pursuing CFTR gene editing and stem cell engraftment for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. We utilize a combination of immortalized and primary cell culture, organoids, mouse and human tissue, and whole animal in vivo studies.

  • Ami J. Shah

    Ami J. Shah

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioI joined Stanford University in 2015 as a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, having completed my training in Pediatric Hematology/ Oncology at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. My areas of clinical expertise have been in the areas of transplantation for immune deficiencies and immune reconstitution post HSCT. I have been actively involved with the care and treatment of children with primary immune deficiencies and work with the Primary Immune Deficiencies Consortium (PIDTC). I am very interested in cellular therapies as a treatment modality for rare genetic diseases. I currently am the PI for several gene therapy trials at Stanford for various disorders including cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (cALD), Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia and Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency. My other main areas of research have been in studying the late effects of patients following stem cell transplantation, in specific the neurocognitive function post HSCT. I have been involved with several national committees addressing the late effects of HSCT within the ASBMT and COG.

    In addition to my research work in stem cell transplantation, I have been actively involved with mentorship and graduate medical education. I am currently the Program Director for the Hematology/ Oncology Fellowship and serve as a mentor through the Pediatric Mentoring Group.