School of Medicine


Showing 1-6 of 6 Results

  • Matt van de Rijn

    Matt van de Rijn

    Sabine Kohler, MD, Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on molecular analysis of human soft tissue tumors (sarcomas) with an emphasis on leiomyosarcoma and desmoid tumors. In addition we study the role of macrophages in range of malignant tumors.

  • Stephanie Van de Ven

    Stephanie Van de Ven

    Deputy Director, Canary Center at Stanford, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    BioAs Deputy Director of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection I broadly oversee its operations and research programs. The Canary Center is focused on developing in vitro and in vivo tools for early cancer detection and its research spans the areas of biomarker discovery, development of molecular imaging agents, development of new diagnostic and imaging devices, and mathematical modeling. In my position I facilitate the clinical translation of cancer diagnostic tools and I enable innovative interdisciplinary research. My research expertise includes leading phase I-II clinical trials to evaluate a newly developed optical breast imaging system in combination with a novel imaging agent. I gained valuable experience in clinical translation of medical devices and in testing new imaging agents for the first time in patients. My training as a Radiology resident was instrumental in my decision to focus on cancer early detection research, because it clearly confronted me with the problem that most cancer patients are being diagnosed too late. I expanded my knowledge on biomarker research by developing proteomics assays during my postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford, in conjunction with my continued work in optical and photoacoustic molecular imaging. In my current role, I work with the faculty of the Canary Center and the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, and am committed to advancing cancer research by applying my medical training, clinical knowledge, and research expertise to managing collaborative programs and contribute to the success of the Center and its faculty.

  • Capucine van Rechem

    Capucine van Rechem

    Assistant Professor of Pathology (Pathology Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy long-term interest lies in understanding the impact chromatin modifiers have on disease development and progression so that more optimal therapeutic opportunities can be achieved. My laboratory explores the direct molecular impact of chromatin-modifying enzymes during cell cycle progression, and characterizes the unappreciated and unconventional roles that these chromatin factors have on cytoplasmic function such as protein synthesis.

  • Jose Vilches-Moure

    Jose Vilches-Moure

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioDr. José G. Vilches-Moure, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor, received his DVM degree from Purdue University in Indiana in 2007. He completed his residency training in Anatomic Pathology (with emphasis in pathology of laboratory animal species) and his PhD in Comparative Pathology at the University of California-Davis. He joined Stanford in 2015, and is the Director of the Animal Histology Services (AHS). Dr. Vilches-Moure is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and his collaborative research interests include cardiac development and pathology, developmental pathology, and refinement of animal models in which to study early cancer detection techniques. His teaching interests include comparative anatomy/histology, general pathology, comparative pathology, and pathology of laboratory animal species.

  • Hannes Vogel

    Hannes Vogel

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics (Pediatric Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include nerve and muscle pathology, mitochondrial diseases, pediatric neurooncology, and transgenic mouse pathology.