School of Medicine


Showing 1-13 of 13 Results

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person’s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer’s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Christina Young

    Christina Young

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Christina Young obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology as well as her MS in Statistics at Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the University of Illinois Chicago where she specialized in neuropsychology. She continued her neuropsychology training as well as her research during her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Young's research focuses on identifying real-world declines in cognition that track with the pathological changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Her work incorporates novel measures of cognition as well as neuroimaging to improve the detection and monitoring of early cognitive decline in the context of AD and related dementias. She has been awarded grant funding through a K99/R00 from the NIH and an Alzheimer's Association Research Fellowship to Promote Diversity (AARF-D) from the Alzheimer's Association.

  • Maya Yutsis

    Maya Yutsis

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Neurology

    BioMaya Yutsis, Ph.D., ABPP-CN is a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is a neuropsychologist at the Stanford Alzheimer's Disease and Research Center (ADRC), Stanford Concussion and Sports Medicine Clinic, and Neuropsychology Service. She received her doctorate in clinical psychology at the Palo AltoUniversity in 2009, completed an APA approved clinical internship in neuropsychology at the Minneapolis VA Medical center and a two-year post doctoral fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN in 2011. She received her board certification in Clinical Neuropsychology through the American Board of Professional Psychology. Prior to coming to Stanford, she worked as a lead neuropsychologist at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program and Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC) Telehealth Neuropsychology clinic and served as a director/preceptor of an APA-approved post-doctoral fellowship Neuropsychology Emphasis Area training program. She is currently a Newsletter Editor of the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, APA Division 40. Her research interests focus on computerized assessment and interventions for persons with acquired brain injury, sport-related concussion, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    PUBLICATIONS (Selected from 15)
    Yam, A, Rickards, T, Pawlowski, C, Yutsis, M. (in Press). Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Approach for Functional Neurological Symptom (Conversion) Disorder: A Case Study. Rehabilitation Psychology

    Duchnick, J, Ropacki, S.A., Yutsis, M.V., Petska, K., & Pawlowski, C.A., (2015). Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Programs: Comprehensive, holistic rehabilitation for community integration after brain injury. Psychological Services, 5.

    Yochim, B, Beaudreau, S, Fairchild, JK, Yutsis, M, Raymond, N, Friedman, L, Yesavage, J. (2015). A Verbal Naming Test for use with older adults: Development and initial validation. Journal of International Neuropsychological Society, 21, 239-248.

    Bergquist, T, Yutsis, M, Sullan, M. (2014). Satisfaction with cognitive rehabilitation delivered via the Internet in persons with acquired brain injury. International Journal of Telerehabilitation, 6(2), 39-50.

    Giese-Davis, J., Tamagawa, R., Yutsis, M., Twirbutt, S., Piemme, K., Neri, E., Taylor, C. B., Spiegel, D. (2012) Which symptoms matter? Self-report and observer discrepancies in repressors and high-anxious women with metastatic breast cancer. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Published online October 20, 2012.

    Yutsis, M., Bergquist, T., Micklewright, J. Smigielski, J., Brown, A. (2012) Pre-treatment compensation use is a better correlate of activity limitations than cognitive impairment in persons with acquired brain injury. Brain Injury, 26(11),1297-1306.

    Bergquist, T., Micklewright, J., Yutsis, M., Smigielski, J., Gehl, C., Brown, A. (2012) Achievement of client-centered goals by persons with acquired brain injury in comprehensive day treatment is associated with greater vocational and residential independence at discharge and 1 year follow-up. Brain Injury,26(11), 1307-1314

    Forducey, PG, Glueckauf, RL, Bergquist, R, Maheu, MM, Yutsis, M (2012). Telehealth for persons with severe functional disabilities and their caregivers: Facilitating self-care management in a home setting. Psychological Services, 9(2), 144-162.