School of Medicine


Showing 61-70 of 80 Results

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person’s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer’s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Christina Young

    Christina Young

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Christina Young obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology as well as her MS in Statistics at Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the University of Illinois Chicago where she specialized in neuropsychology. She continued her neuropsychology training as well as her research during her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Young's research focuses on identifying real-world declines in cognition that track with the pathological changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Her work incorporates novel measures of cognition as well as neuroimaging to improve the detection and monitoring of early cognitive decline in the context of AD and related dementias. She has been awarded grant funding through a K99/R00 from the NIH and an Alzheimer's Association Research Fellowship to Promote Diversity (AARF-D) from the Alzheimer's Association.

  • Shady Younis

    Shady Younis

    Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioShady Younis, PhD is an instructor at the division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Medical Sciences from Uppsala University in Sweden. He later joined Dr. William Robinson’s Lab at Stanford University as Wallenberg postdoctoral fellow, where he characterized the pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis. His current research aimed at elucidating the underlying triggers of pathogenic B cell responses in a spectrum of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS). He uses computational methodologies alongside cutting-edge high-throughput sequencing technologies to characterize the autoreactive B and T cells. The overarching research objective of his research is to unravel the mechanistic roles of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) reactivation in activating and transforming autoreactive B cells in the development of autoimmunity.

  • Bo Yu, MD

    Bo Yu, MD

    Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Yu’s lab is interested in ovarian physiology and pathology, as well as assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

  • Charles Yu MD

    Charles Yu MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCorneal opacity is a leading cause of blindness. Cornea transplantation is at high risk of rejection when there is pre-existing vascularization of the cornea and in pediatric patients. Cornea transplant shortage remains a worldwide problem with millions on waitlists. Our laboratory is developing multiple strategies for treatment of corneal blindness. We are testing advanced materials and designs for keratoprostheses with the goal of reducing complications and easing surgical implantation. We are also developing intraocular electronic display prostheses for bypassing cornea opacity, a novel strategy that could allow for high quality vision without corneal clarity.

  • Grace Chen Yu

    Grace Chen Yu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Yu is a modern-day version of the “old-fashioned family doc” who delights in caring for patients from “cradle to grave,” while also promoting the health of her community and developing the future leaders of family medicine. On any particular day, one might find her counseling a long-time smoker on quitting, draining an abscess in clinic, delivering a baby, doing a phone (or sometimes home) visit with one of her elderly patients, lecturing about High-Value Health Care, facilitating a diabetes group visit, singing the praises of coordinated primary care to politicians, discussing end-of-life options with a hospitalized patient, or sharing some of her stories as mother-doctor-teacher with one of her advisees. In 2016, adding one more hat to the mix, Dr. Yu became Program Director of the 24-resident Stanford Health Care - O’Connor Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program. Whereas the old-fashioned family doc was a master at caring for patients at different ages and stages of life, as a modern-day family physician, Dr. Yu is committed to researching ways to do so more effectively and efficiently. She considers it a privilege to be a part of her patients' lives and hopes to help both her patients and her trainees find a path to better health and happiness. To keep herself in great health, Dr. Yu enjoys playing the piano, photography, scuba diving, adventure travel (all the more adventurous with her three children in tow!), and spending time with her family and friends.