School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 166 Results

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Partial Leave from 04/01/2022 To 11/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and their intersection with chronic pain.

  • Fiona Baumer

    Fiona Baumer

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCauses of Disturbed Cognition in Pediatric Epilepsy

  • Michael Eddy F Belloy

    Michael Eddy F Belloy

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioMy broad scientific goal is to investigate neurological disorders with the aim of identifying novel mechanisms that improve understanding of disease pathophysiology and that could lead to novel drug development. I pursue this goal by investigating the genetic risk factors of the respective disease under question, studying how they contribute to disruptions of brain function measured by in vivo imaging techniques, and how they correlate with the presentation of disease-sensitive biomarkers. Within this broader scope, my primary interest is to focus specifically on Alzheimer's disease, elucidating the genetic, molecular, and clinical spectrum of the disease, and hopefully, eventually, contributing to the path towards a cure.

    I am a highly interdisciplinary scientist with experience in programming (using various scripting languages), advanced data analyses methods, neuroimaging, and studies of preclinical mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. I also have a long-standing interest in brain function and network dynamics in both health and disease. During my postdoc at Stanford, I have further gained experience into the clinical aspects, imaging approaches, and genetics of Alzheimer’s disease. Altogether, this translates into my current research strategy in which I investigate large-scale multimodal datasets that contain information on genetics, multi-omics, clinical outcome measures, structural and functional brain properties, and other biomarker data.

    I am currently an Instructor at Stanford university, in the lab of Dr. Michael D Greicius. My main aims in this lab are to identify genetic factors that may be causative to Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, I aim to uncover genetic risk factors that interact with the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene to alter risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Further, I seek to identify how genetic interactions differ by sex, age, and genetic ancestry. I believe this will allow the identification of novel genes relevant to Alzheimer's disease and contribute to advancing personalized genetic medicine.

    During my PhD, supervised by Dr. Marleen Verhoye, Dr. Shella Keilholz and Dr. Georgios A Keliris, I worked on developing dynamic resting state functional (rsf)MRI in mice, which lead to the first observation of mouse Quasi-Periodic patterns, and related applications for Alzheimer's disease research in rodents. I still have an ongoing interest in dynamic rsfMRI research.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.