School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 37 Results

  • Martin Brown

    Martin Brown

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe seek to understand the mechanisms responsible for the resistance of cancers to treatment and to develop strategies to overcome these resistances. We are using molecular and cellular techniques and mouse models to potentiate the activity of radiation on tumors by inhibiting the bone marrow rescue of the tumor vasculature following therapy.

  • Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPatient-centered and artificial intelligence-augmented medical decision making

  • Daniel Chang

    Daniel Chang

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI specialize in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. I am interested in developing stereotactic body radiotherapy for tumors of the liver, both primary and metastatic. I am interested in developing functional imaging as a means of determining treatment response with radiation. I am also interested in developing image-guided radiotherapy to improve radiation delivery for GI cancers to reduce toxicity and improve disease outcome.

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Jack, Lulu, and Sam Willson Professor and Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are focused on minimizing the impact of breast cancer from a diagnostic and therapuetic standpoint. Breast MRI is a powerful tool to facilitate the screening for and staging of breast cancer, and can be valuable adjunct to guide breast surgery. Oncoplastic surgical techniques optimize cosmesis after breast cancer surgery. Accelerated radiotherapy after lumpectomy decreases radiotherapy treatment times from 6 weeks to just 1 to 5 days.

  • Scott Dixon

    Scott Dixon

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is interested in the relationship between cell death and metabolism. Using techniques drawn from many disciplines my laboratory is investigating how perturbation of intracellular metabolic networks can result in novel forms of cell death, such as ferroptosis. We are interested in applying this knowledge to find new ways to treat diseases characterized by insufficient (e.g. cancer) or excessive (e.g. neurodegeneration) cell death.

  • Michael Gensheimer

    Michael Gensheimer

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn addition to my clinical research in head and neck and lung cancer, I work on the application of computer science and machine learning to cancer research. I develop tools for analyzing large datasets to improve outcomes and safety of cancer treatment. I developed a machine learning prognostic model using data from around 13,000 patients with metastatic cancer which performs better than traditional models and physicians [PubMed ID 33313792]. We recently completed a prospective randomized study in thousands of patients in which the model was used to help improve advance care planning conversations.

    I also work on the methods underpinning observational and predictive modeling research. My open source nnet-survival software that allows use of neural networks for survival modeling has been used by researchers internationally. In collaboration with the Stanford Research Informatics Center, I examined how electronic medical record (EMR) survival outcome data compares to gold-standard data from a cancer registry [PubMed ID 35802836]. The EMR data captured less than 50% of deaths, a finding that affects many studies being published that use EMR outcomes data.