School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 50 Results

  • Lusine Aghajanova, M.D., Ph.D.

    Lusine Aghajanova, M.D., Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

    BioDr. Aghajanova received her medical degree from Yerevan State Medical University in Armenia, followed by residency in obstetrics and gynecology, then completed PhD in Human Implantation at Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, followed with embryology training at Karolinska Institute, with an Internship in Austria.
    She continued her research as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California San Francisco.

    Subsequently, Dr. Aghajanova completed residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas and at UC San Francisco. She proceeded then with subspecialty fellowship training in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at UC San Francisco. She is a respected researcher in the field of endometrial receptivity, implantation and endometriosis.

    Dr. Aghajanova speaks Russian and Armenian and is very well published with over 50 peer-reviewed publications as well as numerous other oral and poster presentations and is a professional peer-reviewer for over 12 journals.

    Dr.Aghajanova enjoys spending time with her husband and children, and traveling.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:
    http://med.stanford.edu/bacchettalab.html

  • Jacob S. Ballon

    Jacob S. Ballon

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioJacob S. Ballon, M.D., M.P.H. specializes in the treatment of people with psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. He is the Co-Director of the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford which provides interdisciplinary care for people experiencing psychosis. He is also the medical director of H2 acute inpatient unit at Stanford Hospital. Dr. Ballon completed his residency at Stanford in 2009 and a Schizophrenia Research Fellowship at Columbia University in 2011.

    INSPIRE is an innovative interdisciplinary client-centered resource providing respectful evidence-based care to support people to achieve meaningful recovery from psychosis through collaborative partnership with individuals and their families while advancing knowledge and training for a new generation of providers. With a recovery-oriented philosophy, the clinic provides an array of services including psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial evaluations. As a research clinic, they are focused on collaborating with multiple disciplines throughout the university to conduct clinical and basic science research including functional imaging, clinical trials, basic pathophysiology, and genetics.

    Dr. Ballon maintains an interest in understanding the connections between the brain and the rest of the body as relates to the manifestation and treatment of people who experience psychosis. He works closely with a diverse group of researchers throughout the university and technology community to investigate these connections. He has active projects investigating the metabolic implications of schizophrenia and of psychiatric medication including the association of antipsychotic medication with weight gain and insulin resistance.

    In understanding the whole-body impact of psychiatric illness, Dr. Ballon also has an active interest in the role that exercise can play in psychiatric treatment. He is the site-principal investigator of an NIMH-funded clinical trial looking at the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in people with schizophrenia.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and their peptoid mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Gerald Crabtree

    Gerald Crabtree

    David Korn, MD, Professor of Pathology and Professor of Developmental Biology
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 09/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChromatin regulation and its roles in human cancer and the development of the nervous system. Engineering new methods for studying and controlling chromatin and epigenetic regulation in living cells.

  • Shirit Einav

    Shirit Einav

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via molecular and systems virology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, coronaviruses, encephalitic alphaviruses, and Ebola, and means to predict progression to severe disease.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Richard Frock

    Richard Frock

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of DNA double-strand break repair and chromosomal translocations

  • Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lawrence Fung is a scientist and psychiatrist specialized in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the father of a neurodiverse teenager with ASD. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, which strives to uncover the strengths of neurodiverse individuals and utilize their talents to increase innovation and productivity of the society as a whole. He directs the Neurodiverse Student Support Program, Neurodiversity at Work Program (recently funded by Autism Speaks), and Adult Neurodevelopment Clinic at Stanford. Dr. Fung is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His lab advances the understanding of neural bases of human socio-communicative and cognitive functions by using novel neuroimaging and technologies. His team devise and implement novel interventions to improve the lives of neurodiverse individuals by maximizing their potential and productivity. For example, he is conducting a study to demonstrate that specialized employment programs such as Neurodiversity at Work program will result in higher retention rates and quality of life.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • David L. Griffith, MD

    David L. Griffith, MD

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Educational Programs and Services (EPS)

    BioDr. David L. Griffith is a San Jose Native. He is board certified in Family Medicine, and he has been in practice with Almaden Family Physicians Medical Group since 1988. Dr. Griffith is an active-affiliate medical staff member at Good Samaritan Hospital. Dr. Griffith also holds a Master’s degree in anatomy and he is a veteran of missionary duty at the Liberian Leprosy Colony.

    Dr. Griffith is married to Jennifer, who is an elementary school teacher. Together they have raised four children. He enjoys his faith, family, friends, the practice of medicine and his patients. He also like classical music and trail running.

  • Bereketeab Haileselassie

    Bereketeab Haileselassie

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory is focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms which mediate end-organ failure in pediatric sepsis. Our current work focuses on determining the role of altered mitochondrial dynamics in sepsis-induced multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Specifically, we focus on understanding the mechanisms that mediate derangements in mitochondrial fission and autophagy in sepsis.

  • Yang Hu, MD, PhD

    Yang Hu, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ultimate goal of the laboratory is to develop efficient therapeutic strategies to achieve CNS neural repair, through promoting neuroprotection, axon regeneration and functional recovery.

    More specifically, we study retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic nerve in various optic neuropathies including traumatic, glaucomatous and inflammatory optic nerve injuries to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of CNS neurodegeneration and axon regeneration failure.