School of Medicine


Showing 91-100 of 121 Results

  • Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioRESEARCH FOCUS
    Translational cognitive neuroscience of aging and dementia. Neuroethics.

    TRAINING
    Dr. Rosen is board certified in clinical neuropsychology with a geriatric focus. She completed college at Brown University, a clinical psychology Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University, clinical neuropsychology internship at the Long Island Jewish Hospital in New York, and clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Rosen completed specialty research fellowship training at the National Institute on Aging (Intramural Research Training Award) and Stanford (NRSA F32, K01) in functional imaging and noninvasive brain stimulation with support from NIA.

    CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
    Dr. Rosen is Director of Dementia Education at the Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the Palo Alto VAHCS. She is also a neuropsychologist and part of the consensus clinical group and education core at the Stanford’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (NIA). Dr. Rosen’s funded research has focused on applying cognitive neuroscience of aging to improve clinical practice in older adults by using cognitive measures, brain imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation such as TMS. Studies include using fMRI as an outcome measure for cognitive training, studying how to improve the accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting with and without image guidance, and using structural MRI to avoid postoperative cognitive decline and improve outcome from carotid vascular procedures. She has a longstanding commitment to neuroethics and leads a feature in the Journal of Alzheimer Disease that focuses on ethical issues in new and emerging AD applications.

    ETHICS EDITOR, JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
    Ethics Review
    http://www.j-alz.com/blogs/discussion/protecting-progress

    MIRECC DEMENTIA EDUCATION
    http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn21/education/dementia_education.asp

  • Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims at improving processes and outcomes of mental health care for veterans other people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders.

    My primary focus is improving access to evidence-based treatments PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. My second emphasis is using telemedicine technologies to expand access to effective care. My third interest is measurement-based care, using ongoing data on patient progress to inform patients' and clinicians' decisions.

  • Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rossi’s research focuses on developing, evaluating, and implementing assessment tools and interventions to improve the safety and mental health of individuals at risk of intimate partner violence, suicide, and drug overdose. She is particularly interested in using technology and clinical decision support tools to enhance the quality and implementation of intimate partner violence-, suicide-, and substance use-related care.

  • Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Adjunct Lecturer, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioThe overarching aim of Dr. Scanlon’s research is to develop and evaluate low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. To that end, the Caregiver Technology Division of the Scanlon Lab aims to enhance patient- and family-centered care through novel, broadly customizable, and highly scalable caregiver interventions. In parallel, the Neurodegenerative Division of the Scanlon Lab focuses on the development and application of cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and biological markers for the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration.

    Dr. Scanlon received his bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience and doctorate in Clinical Health Psychology from the University of Miami. After concluding his clinical internship in Geropsychology/Neuropsychology at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS), he completed fellowships in Aging and Dementia at Stanford University School of Medicine and VAPAHCS. Dr. Scanlon is currently a VA Career Development Awardee in the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) and Stanford/VA Aging Clinical Research Center where his work focuses on developing and evaluating low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. He also serves as Co-Director of the Stanford/VA California Alzheimer's Disease Center, Chair of the VAPAHCS Dementia Committee, and Co-Chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 21 Dementia Committee.

  • Logan Schneider

    Logan Schneider

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFrom a research perspective, my long-term career plan is to refine the understanding of normal and dysfunctional sleep, much like the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) and Epi4K are doing for the enigmatic epilepsies. Insufficient sleep has been deemed a public health problem with poorly understood behavioral and physiologic sleep disorders lying at the core of the issue. I am currently using well-defined distinct and objective phenotypes (e.g. periodic limb movements, hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy) to acquire the analytic skills necessary to expand my knowledge of both signal processing and genetics, with the former enhancing my ability to identify and/or refine sleep phenotypes, and the latter facilitating the pathophysiological understanding of these phenotypes. As a consequence of a better link between symptoms/phenotypes, physiology, and genetic risks, more personally targeted and effective therapeutics can be developed to address the enriched spectrum of sleep disorders.