School of Medicine


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  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Leila Montaser Kouhsari, MD, PhD

    Leila Montaser Kouhsari, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Montaser Kouhsari is a board-certified, fellowship-trained movement disorders neurologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University.

    Her clinical interests include treating cognitive, motor, and non-motor impairments due to Parkinson's disease, atypical Parkinsonism (Multiple System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Cortical Basal Syndrome), tremor, and ataxia. Dr. Montaser Kouhsari also assesses and manages Deep Brain Stimulations (DBS) treatment for Parkinson's disease and tremor. Her research interests include underlying mechanisms through which Parkinson's disease affects memory, executive function, and decision-making. She is also investigating the role of cognition as a biomarker for early diagnosis of movement disorders.

    Before joining Stanford University, Dr. Montaser Kouhsari was a fellow in the movement disorders center at Columbia University and Zuckerman Institute. She completed her post-doctoral training in neuroimaging of cognitive processes such as decision-making at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and her neurology residency at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. She earned her M.D. from Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) and her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from New York University (NYU).

    Dr. Montaser Kouhsari's work has appeared in the Journal of Neuroscience, Nature Neuroscience, Neuropsychologia, Journal of Vision, and Vision Research. She has been featured in Neurology Today news. She has presented at meetings held by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the American Neurological Association (ANA), Society for Neuroscience (SFN), and the Movement Disorders Society (MDS).

    Dr. Montaser Kouhsari has received the woman in neuroscience award to attend the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the Friends of Katzell research fellowship, and the Seaver Foundation Graduate Student award. She was honored to receive the National Institute of Health R25 training research grant before joining Stanford University.

    Dr. Montaser Kouhsari is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and Movement Disorders Society.

  • Elizabeth Mormino

    Elizabeth Mormino

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Neurology

    BioDr. Beth Mormino completed a PhD in Neuroscience at UC Berkeley in the laboratory of Dr. William Jagust, where she performed some of the initial studies applying Amyloid PET with the tracer PIB to clinically normal older individuals. This initial work provided evidence that the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer’s disease begin years before clinical symptoms and are associated with subtle changes to brain regions critical for memory. During her postdoctoral fellowship with Drs. Reisa Sperling and Keith Johnson at Massachusetts General Hospital she used multimodal imaging techniques to understand longitudinal cognitive changes among individuals classified as preclinical AD. In 2017, Dr. Mormino joined the faculty at Stanford University in the department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. Her research program focuses on combining imaging and genetics to predict cognitive trajectories over time, and the integration of novel PET scans to better understand human aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

  • Martha Morrell, MD

    Martha Morrell, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Morrell is a Clinical Professor of Neurology at Stanford University since July 2004. Before joining NeuroPace, she was the Caitlin Tynan Doyle Professor of Clinical Neurology at Columbia University and Director of the Columbia Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Previously she was on the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine where she served as Director of the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. A graduate of Stanford Medical School, she completed residency training in Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as fellowship training in EEG and epilepsy.

    Dr. Morrell has been actively involved in helping to bring new medical and device therapies to patients with epilepsy. Since 2004, she has been Chief Medical Officer at NeuroPace, a company that developed a responsive neurostimulator for treatment of medically uncontrolled partial seizures. She has authored or coauthored more than 150 publications.

    Service to professional societies includes member of the Board of Directors of the American Epilepsy Society, member and Chair of the Board of the Epilepsy Foundation, member of the Council of the American Neurological Association and Chair of the Epilepsy Section of the American Academy of Neurology. She is an elected Ambassador for Epilepsy of the International League Against Epilepsy and received the American Epilepsy Society’s 2007 Service Award for outstanding leadership and service. She is the current President of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics.

  • Leon S. Moskatel, MD

    Leon S. Moskatel, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Moskatel is internist with fellowship training in headache medicine and board certification in internal medicine. He is a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Neurology, Division of Headache.

    His practice at the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of all forms of headache. Patients come to him seeking relief from migraine, cluster, and tension headaches.

    Dr. Moskatel teaches headache medicine to medical students and supervises resident physicians in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic.

    He conducts research into migraine and diet, medication overuse headache, and long-lasting headache after COVID-19. He has written articles on these and other topics. They have appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as Headache, Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, Annals of Headache Medicine, and Pain Medicine.

    Dr. Moskatel has reviewed the content of articles written by other doctors for the journals Headache and Pain Medicine. The publication Annals of Internal Medicine awarded him a letter of commendation as outstanding reviewer.

    He has co-authored textbook chapters on migraine and diet and on headache treatments. He has presented his research discoveries to his peers at meetings of the World Headache Society and other organizations.

    Dr. Moskatel volunteers his time to serve both professional and community organizations. He speaks English and Hebrew fluently and reads French.

  • Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinician scientist with a background in engineering, epidemiology and neuro-ophthalmology. In my research, I combine tools from these disciplines with the goal of understanding and preventing vision loss from optic nerve diseases. My focus is on papilledema, the swelling of the optic nerve head due to elevation in intracranial pressure, which we are characterizing using electrophysiological and imaging techniques. Other areas of interest are peri-operative vision loss and optic neuritis.

  • Seema Nagpal, MD

    Seema Nagpal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm a board certified neuro-oncologist who treats both primary brain tumors as well as metastatic disease to the brain and nervous system. My research concentrates on clinical trials for patients with late-stage central nervous system cancer. I have a special interest in leptomeningeal disease, a devastating complication of lung and breast cancers. I collaborate with Stanford scientists to detect this disease earlier, and with our breast and lung oncologists to improve outcomes for patients.

  • Viet Nguyen, MD

    Viet Nguyen, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Viet Nguyen is a neurophysiologist and Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology at Stanford School of Medicine. His practice focuses on Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IONM).

    Dr. Nguyen was fellowship-trained at Stanford in Clinical Neurophysiology, with an emphasis in IONM.

    The IONM service uses somatosensory and motor evoked potentials (SSEP, MEP), electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) to help minimize risk in procedures that involve the nervous system. These include surgeries and endovascular procedures for cerebral aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), carotid stenosis, brain and spinal tumors, spinal deformities like scoliosis and spinal stenosis, peripheral nerve injury and tumors, aortic aneurysms, trigeminal neuralgia, facial dystonia, and others.

    He has published, presented research, and lectured at national and international meetings on IONM topics, and is active in multiple professional organizations in the field, including the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society, Society of Clinical Neurologists, and American Academy of Neurology.