School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 65 Results

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Michele Calos

    Michele Calos

    Professor of Genetics, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is developing innovative gene and stem cell therapies for genetic diseases, with a focus on gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    We have created novel methods for inserting therapeutic genes into the chromosomes at specific places by using homologous recombination and recombinase enzymes.

    We are working on 3 forms of muscular dystrophy.

    We created induced pluripotent stem cells from patient fibroblasts, added therapeutic genes, differentiated, and engrafted the cells.

  • MaryAnn Campion

    MaryAnn Campion

    Professor (Teaching) of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests includes genetics education, genetic counseling access and service delivery, professional development, and faculty vitality and burnout.

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research, Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Mike Cherry

    Mike Cherry

    Professor (Research) of Genetics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research involves identifying, validating and integrating scientific facts into encyclopedic databases essential for research and scientific education. Published results of scientific experimentation are a foundation of our understanding of the natural world and provide motivation for new experiments. The combination of in-depth understanding reported in the literature with computational analyses is an essential ingredient of modern biological research.

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Genetics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.

  • Le Cong

    Le Cong

    Assistant Professor of Pathology (Pathology Research) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab are developing gene-editing technologies, such as CRISPR systems for in vivo therapy, and cleavage-free techniques for large gene insertion via microbial recombinase. Our team also pioneers in single-cell tracking for cancer and immunology studies using novel CRISPR tools. To accelerate our work, we integrate AI and machine learning into these technologies, design and evolve proteins/RNAs, pushing frontiers in understanding and treating neurological and immunological disease.

  • Christina Curtis

    Christina Curtis

    RZ Cao Professor, Professor of Genetics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Curtis laboratory for Cancer Computational and Systems Biology is focused on the development and application of innovative experimental, computational, and analytical approaches to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and early detection of cancer.

  • Kyle Gabriel Daniels

    Kyle Gabriel Daniels

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    BioKyle obtained his BS in Biochemistry from the University of Maryland College Park in 2010, conducting undergraduate research with Dr. Dorothy Beckett, PhD. He obtained his PhD in Biochemistry with a certificate in Structural Biology and Biophysics. His dissertation is titled "Kinetics of Coupled Binding and Conformational Change in Proteins and RNA" and was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Terrence G. Oas, PhD. Kyle performed postdoctoral training with Dr. Wendell A. Lim, PhD at UCSF studying how CAR T cell phenotype is encoded by modular signaling motifs within chimeric antigen receptors.

    Kyle's lab is interested in harnessing the principles of modularity to engineer receptors and gene circuits to control cell functions.

    The lab will use synthetic biology, medium- and high-throughput screens, and machine learning to: (1) Engineer immune cells to achieve robust and durable responses against various cancer targets, (2) Coordinate behavior of multiple engineered cell types in cancer, autoimmune disease, and payload delivery, (3) Control survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and immune cells, and (4) Explore principles of modularity related to engineering receptors and gene circuits in mammalian cells.