School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 45 Results

  • Rogelio A. Hernández-López

    Rogelio A. Hernández-López

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group works at the interface of mechanistic, synthetic, and systems biology to understand and program cellular recognition, communication, and organization. We are currently interested in engineering biomedical relevant cellular behaviors for cancer immunotherapy.

  • Laura Johnston

    Laura Johnston

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), more specifically, allogeneic transplantation and graft versus host disease. Exploring methods of improving prevention and treatment of GVHD as well as the long term follow-up and/or quality of life of affected patients.

  • Michael Lim, M.D.

    Michael Lim, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy), of Medicine (Oncology), of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Neurology

    BioDr. Lim is the Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery and a board-certified neurosurgeon specializing in brain tumors and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Dr. Lim’s clinical interests include the treatment of benign and malignant brain tumors, with special interest in gliomas, meningiomas, metastatic tumors, and skull base tumors. Dr. Lim also specializes in surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. During his time at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Lim built one of the largest brain tumor and trigeminal neuralgia practices and utilized the most advanced surgical technologies and techniques for his patients. As a passionate voice for patient experience, he has been recognized by his peers and patients for his integrity and compassionate care, including a Service Excellence Award from HealthNetwork Foundation.

    As a mentor, he has garnered numerous teaching awards, including being honored as an outstanding teacher by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is actively involved in shaping education for neurosurgery and oncology across the United States and around the world. He is the recipient of the prestigious 2023 Abhijit Guha Award in Neuro-Oncology.

    Dr. Lim’s research interests focus on harnessing the immune system to fight cancer. His laboratory focuses on understanding mechanisms of immune evasion by cancer cells. He has successfully translated his findings from the laboratory to the clinics and has conducted and led several large national immunotherapy clinical trials for brain tumors.

    Dr. Lim’s bibliography contains well over 300 articles on topics such as immunotherapy for glioblastoma, long-term survival of glioma patients treated with stereotactic radiation, and treatment of neuropathic pain. His work has appeared in Science Translational Medicine, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet Oncology, Nature Immunology, and many more publications. He also has written 20 book chapters and monographs.

    Dr. Lim is a world leader in immunotherapy for brain tumors. In addition to being invited world-wide to give lectures and seminars, he has given platform presentations on the topics of immunotherapy for brain tumors, neurosurgical techniques and management of brain tumors at the American Society of Clinical Oncologists, American Academy of Neurological Surgeons, Radiological Society of North America, Annual Symposium on Brain and Spine Metastases, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and other meetings. In addition, he has served as platform chairman of the CNS session at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference.

    Dr. Lim is a member of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Society for Neuro-Oncology. Dr. Lim served as the program co-chair of the Society for Neuro-Oncology and CNS section of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. He also served on many executive committees, including the Executive Committee for the Joint Tumor Section of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  • Robert Lowsky

    Robert Lowsky

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lowsky's research is focused on understanding the role of regulatory T cells in the prevention of GVHD and in promoting immune tolerance following organ transplantation.

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRecent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that genetically engineered T cells can eradicate cancers resistant to all other therapies. We are identifying new targets for these therapeutics, exploring pathways of resistance to current cell therapies and creating next generation platforms to overcome therapeutic resistance. We have discovered novel insights into the biology of human T cell exhaustion and developed approaches to prevent and reverse this phenomenon.

  • Holden Maecker

    Holden Maecker

    Professor (Research) of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm interested in immune monitoring of T cell responses to chronic pathogens and cancer, and the correlation of T cell response signatures with disease protection.

  • Everett Meyer

    Everett Meyer

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy), of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) and, by courtesy, of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focus in T cell immunotherapy and T cell immune monitoring using high-throughput sequencing and genomic approaches, with an emphasis on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the treatment of graft-versus-host disease and immune tolerance induction.

  • David Miklos

    David Miklos

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Miklos is the Chief of BMT & Cell Therapy Program. He leads clinical trials treating patients with lymphoma. His correlative research studies: 1) tumor antigen quantification, 2) single cell functional product characterization, 3) CAR-FACS immune phenotyping of blood and tumor, and identifying mechanisms for CAR-T treatment Failure including antigen loss, CAR-T exhaustion, and CAR suppression.

  • Lori Muffly

    Lori Muffly

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Muffly's interests include health services research and clinical trials with a focus on acute leukemia and blood and marrow transplantation.

  • Hiromitsu (Hiro) Nakauchi

    Hiromitsu (Hiro) Nakauchi

    Professor of Genetics (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslation of discoveries in basic research into practical medical applications

  • Robert Negrin

    Robert Negrin

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur labaratory focuses on the study of immune recognition by T and NK cells with special emphasis on graft vs host disease and graft vs tumor reactions. We utilize both murine and human systems in an effort to enhance graft vs tumor reactions while controlling graft vs host disease. We have developed bioluminescence models in collaboration with the Contag laboratory to study the trafficking of immune effector cells with a special emphasis on NK, T and regulatory T cells.

  • Peter Parham

    Peter Parham

    Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Parham laboratory investigates the biology, genetics, and evolution of MHC class I molecules and NK cell receptors.

  • Sneha Ramakrishna

    Sneha Ramakrishna

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    BioSneha Ramakrishna obtained her B. A. from the University of Chicago and her M.D. from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. In medical school, through the Howard Hughes Medical Research Scholar Award, she joined Dr. Crystal Mackall’s laboratory, where she designed and developed various GD2 CAR-Ts and tested them in preclinical models. During her residency training in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, she cared for some of the first patients treated with CD19 CAR T cells, learning the power of this therapy first-hand. During her fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Johns Hopkins/National Cancer Institute combined program, she worked with Dr. Terry Fry. She evaluated the mechanism of CD22 CAR T cell relapse in patients by developing an antigen escape model and establishing a deeper understanding of the effects of antigen density on CAR-T phenotype, expansion, and persistence (Fry…Ramakrishna…Mackall Nat Med, 2018; Ramakrishna, et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019). Since arriving at Stanford, Dr. Ramakrishna leads an interdisciplinary team that designs, develops, and successfully implements a robust correlative science platform for our novel CAR-T therapies. Analyzing patient samples from our first-in-human GD2 CAR-T trial (NCT04196413) treating a universally fatal cancer, diffuse midline glioma (DMG), we identified that intracerebroventricular CAR-T administration correlates with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced immunosuppressive cell populations in cerebrospinal fluid as compared to intravenous CAR-T administration (Majzner*, Ramakrishna*, et al., Nature 2022 *co-first authors). Her research program evaluates unique sets of patient samples using novel single-cell immune profiling to identify the drivers of CAR-T success or failure. Building on these findings, her team will assess approaches to enhance CAR-T efficacy and translate these findings to the clinic.

    Clinically, Dr. Ramakrishna cares for children with solid tumors and treats hematologic, solid, and brain tumor pediatric patients with CAR T cell therapies in the Cancer Cellular Therapies program.

  • Nathan Reticker-Flynn, PhD

    Nathan Reticker-Flynn, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTo metastasize throughout our bodies, tumors subvert and co-opt our immune systems. Our lab seeks to uncover how these processes occur and develops therapies to put a stop to them.

  • Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioI am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of naïve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of naïve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Smith is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist and hematologist. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    She is a physician-scientist who conducts extensive research. She completed a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Clinical Research Training (now, the Medical Research Scholars) Program and she was a post-doctoral researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her research focuses on studies evaluating strategies whereby donor T cells can be administered to improve outcomes following blood and marrow transplant. Specifically, she studies novel treatment strategies using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy.

    Dr. Smith has been invited to present the findings of her research at regional, national, and international conferences. At the Insights in Hematology Conference, she focused on the use of CAR T cells for blood cancers, whereas she presented her investigations on the associations between CAR T cells and the intestinal microbiome at the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Further, at the annual meeting of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy, she addressed the importance of training scientists from underrepresented populations.

    Dr. Smith has co-authored articles on topics within the field of cancer immunology, including cancer immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and CAR T cell therapy. Her work has appeared in journals, including Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood Advances, Leukemia, Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine, and elsewhere.

    She serves a peer reviewer for publications in various journals, such as Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Haematologica, and ImmunoMedicine. She also has co-written chapters in books, including Pocket Oncology, Current Concepts and Controversies in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and Advanced Concepts in Human Immunology: Prospects for Disease Control.

    Dr. Smith has also earned numerous honors. The American Society of Hematology, Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and many other professional societies and organizations have recognized her achievements as a clinician, researcher, and scholar.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Subcommittee on Immunotherapy and the co-chair of the Committee on Trainees and Junior Faculty for the American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (ASTCT). Other positions in service to professional organizations include co-chairing committees and task forces dedicated to promoting diversity among hematology and cell therapy specialists.