School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 66 Results

  • Linh T Dang

    Linh T Dang

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Educational Programs and Services (EPS)

    BioDr. Linh Dang enjoys practicing full-spectrum primary care. She has a special interest in pediatric and women's health with a particular focus on preventative care.

    As a Bay Area native growing up in East San Jose, Dr. Dang especially enjoys working with a diverse population and the most vulnerable and underserved of the community.

  • Laura M.K. Dassama

    Laura M.K. Dassama

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioLaura Dassama is a chemical biologist who uses principles from chemistry and physics to understand complex biological phenomena, and to leverage that understanding for the modulation of biological processes. Her current research focuses on deciphering the molecular recognition mechanisms of multidrug transporters implicated in drug resistance, rational engineering and repurposing of natural products, and control of transcription factors relevant to sickle cell disease.

  • Shirit Einav

    Shirit Einav

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via molecular and systems virology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, coronaviruses, encephalitic alphaviruses, and Ebola, and means to predict progression to severe disease.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics
    On Leave from 01/01/2014 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Richard Frock

    Richard Frock

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are a functional genomics laboratory interested in elucidating mechanisms of DNA repair pathway choice and genome instability. We employ a powerful discovery platform, High-Throughput Genome-wide Translocation Sequencing (HTGTS), which maps DNA junctions at single nucleotide resolution. Our expertise overlaps many different fields including: genome editing, ionizing radiation and cancer therapeutics, V(D)J and IgH class switch recombination, and meiosis.

  • Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lawrence Fung an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, director of the Neurodiversity Clinic, and principal investigator at the Fung Lab. His work, which focuses on autism and neurodiversity, traverses from multi-modal neuroimaging studies to new conceptualization of neurodiversity and its application to clinical, education, and employment settings. His lab advances the understanding of neural bases of human socio-communicative and cognitive functions by using novel neuroimaging and bioanalytical technologies. Using community-based participatory research approach, his team devises and implements novel interventions to improve the lives of neurodiverse individuals by maximizing their potential and productivity. His work has been supported by various agencies including the National Institutes of Health, Autism Speaks, California Department of Developmental Services, California Department of Rehabilitation, as well as philanthropy. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and MD from George Washington University. He completed his general psychiatry residency, child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship, and postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.