School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 36 Results

  • Halsted Holman

    Halsted Holman

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrganization of community health care programs; management of chronic disease; introduction and evaluation of patient education and self-care practices; evaluation of health care outcomes and health system performance.

  • Jison Hong

    Jison Hong

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioDr. Hong specializes in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of all rheumatologic diseases. She has a special interest in rheumatologic disease manifestations in patients with cancer and receiving cancer treatments. She collaborates with researchers to recruit patients for clinical trials and works with a research coordinator to collect blood and patient demographic information to study the effects of rheumatoid arthritis on cardiovascular disease.

  • Audra Horomanski

    Audra Horomanski

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioDr. Horomanski specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatologic diseases. She received her undergraduate degree from Case Western Reserve University, medical degree from Wright State University, and completed her Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at Stanford University. She is the Director of the Stanford Vasculitis Clinic where she manages the complex care of patients with all types of vasculitis and works closely with partners in related specialties. She has a specific interest in clinical trials and a Graduate Certificate in Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Dr. Horomanski also received training in musculoskeletal ultrasound from the USSONAR program and is an integral part of Stanford's Diagnostic and Interventional Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Clinic. Additional areas of research include the application of ultrasound in the study and management of rheumatologic diseases.

  • Tamiko Katsumoto

    Tamiko Katsumoto

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioTamiko Katsumoto, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. She earned her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at UCSF, including a postdoc in the immunology lab of Dr. Arthur Weiss. She is passionate about sustainable whole-food plant-rich diets with respect to both individual and planetary health, and she is fascinated by the impact of diet on inflammation and autoimmunity. She serves as the director of the Stanford Immune Related Toxicity Working Group, a multidisciplinary group which aims to improve the quality of care of cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitors. Dr. Katsumoto’s research interests include the discovery of novel biomarkers to predict the development of immune-related adverse events (irAEs) in patients on immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies, and optimizing the management of such complications. She has a particular interest in how diet and the microbiome may impact inflammatory conditions, including irAEs. She is fascinated by the relationship between cancer and autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and dermatomyositis, and the paraneoplastic manifestations of various cancers. She is involved in several clinical trials at Stanford and has spent time at Genentech, where she led several clinical trials in immunology.

  • Wilson F Kuswanto, MD, PhD

    Wilson F Kuswanto, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology
    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Immunology and Rheumatology

    BioDr. Kuswanto is a physician scientist, board-certified Rheumatologist and instructor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is currently working with Garry Nolan, PhD and William Robinson MD, PhD to unravel the tissue immune responses in Rheumatologic diseases. Dr. Kuswanto obtained his medical degree at Harvard Medical School, earning his PhD in Immunology with Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoist where he uncovered the role of the immune system in tissue repair and regeneration. He later moved to Stanford University to complete his residency training and Rheumatology fellowship.

  • Amy Ladd, MD

    Amy Ladd, MD

    Elsbach-Richards Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    1. The kinematics and forces associated with thumb carpometcarpal (CMC) function and pathology
    2. The anatomy, microstructure, and immunofluorescent characteristics of the thumb CMC joint
    3. Pathomechaniics of CMC arthritis: biomechanical wear, injury, genetic, and environmental causes
    4. Archiving, vitalizing, and innovating medical and surgical knowledge, most recently with innovative iBook monographs

  • Tobias Lanz

    Tobias Lanz

    Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioTobias Lanz, MD is an Instructor at the Department of Medicine and incoming Assistant Professor at the Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection and the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford. His research focuses on B cell biology in neuroimmunological diseases and rheumatic diseases with neurological manifestations. He uses high-throughput screening technologies, and methods from structural and cell biology to identify new autoantigens and to understand how certain self-reactive B cells escape tolerance mechanisms. He is particularly interested in molecular mechanisms that explain the association between Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) and autoimmunity.
    Tobias went to medical school at the Eberhard Karls University in Tübingen, Germany and at the University College of London. He wrote his MD thesis at Dr. Michael Platten's laboratory at the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research in Tübingen, Germany before joining Dr. Lawrence Steinman’s neuroimmunological laboratory at Stanford as a research scholar. After medical school he pursued his scientific and clinical training at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Department of Neurology at the University Hospital in Heidelberg, Germany. In 2015 he joined Dr. William Robinson’s lab at Stanford, where he investigated environmental triggers of autoimmunity, including viruses and milk consumption. In his most recent work, he characterized the B cell repertoire in the spinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and identified molecular mimicry between EBV EBNA1 and the glial cellular adhesion molecule GlialCAM as a driver of neuroinflammation (Lanz et al., Nature, 2022). His long term objective is to leverage these newly discovered mechanistic insights to develop next-generation biomarkers and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

  • Kate Lorig

    Kate Lorig

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity based psycoeducational intervention studies of disease self management for people with chronic diseases. arthritis, lung diseases, heart disease AIDs, low back pain and diabetes. Programs and studies in Spanish and English. Interventions are in small groups, mailed or on the Internet.