School of Medicine


Showing 271-280 of 281 Results

  • Nobutaka Yoshioka

    Nobutaka Yoshioka

    Affiliate, Neurosurgery
    Visiting Scholar, Neurosurgery

    BioNobutaka Yoshioka is the Director of Neuroplastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Tominaga Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
    He received a doctorate degree in medicine from Osaka City University. He completed a residency program in both plastic surgery and neurosurgery in Japan.
    Board Certified in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Neurosurgery, He is an international member of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and the North American Skull Base Society. He was a post-doctoral associate in Microsurgical Neuroanatomy at UF from 2003 to 2004. He is the author of more than 100 articles (including 27 in English) and one book.
    His current research interests include facial reanimation surgery.

  • Aroosa Zamarud, MD

    Aroosa Zamarud, MD

    Visiting Instructor, Neurosurgery

    BioAroosa Zamarud is an MD and completed her undergraduate education at Bannu Medical College, Khyber Medical University, Pakistan. After her graduation, and one year of medical internship, she worked as a Medical Officer in a charity run Hospital, Zubaida Khaliq Memorial Hospital, Gilgit Baltistan, Pakistan. During her appointment there, she took medical camps to some of the remotest villages in the North of Pakistan, helping some of the most underprivileged people in the country.

    Dr. Zamarud joined the Stanford Neurosurgery department in March, 2022, as a Visiting Instructor. Her research focuses on Clinical Neurooncology and Cyber knife stereotactic radiosurgery as a treatment option for many benign and malignant brain pathologies like Vestibular Schwannoma, Sarcoma, Spinal metastases, Meningioma, Pineal and Pituitary metastases, Arteriovenous malformations, etc.

  • Quan Zhou

    Quan Zhou

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent Research Focus: molecular targeted theranostic imaging of brain tumor and enhanced drug delivery

    Areas of Insterests: molecular imaging, theranostics, fluorescence-guided surgery, brain tumor, drug delivery

    Dr. Zhou has made substantial contributions to the growing biomedical research field of Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging emerged in the mid twentieth century as a highly specialized discipline at the intersection of molecular biology and in vivo imaging, focusing on imaging molecules of medical interest within intact living subjects. Dr. Zhou’s research addresses some of the nation’s most pressing issues related to the development of effective approaches for accurate detection of human diseases and improving their treatment outcome. Her innovations in molecular imaging technology enables the visualization, characterization, and quantification of biologic processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels. The multiple and numerous potentialities of Quan’s work are applicable to the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Her strong education background in biological sciences and biomedical engineering followed by postdoctoral training in translational and clinical research have helped her develop multiple disease-specific molecular probes and imaging strategies for early cancer diagnosis, image-guided surgery, therapeutic delivery prediction and at-risk cardiovascular plaque detection. Her research also contributes to improving the treatment of these disorders by testing and optimizing the execution of new interventions. Her work is expected to have a major economic impact due to earlier disease detection and personalized therapy.

    Dr. Zhou’s research has led to emergence of novel solutions and opportunities, in particular, for molecular imaging of cancer and other diseases, for discovering, leveraging and integration of cancer biomarker and tumor microenvironment information, and for novel approaches to acquire real-time high-resolution contrast enhanced visualization of tumor margin and optimization based on imaging depth, quality and speed. Dr. Zhou has been able to formulate the involved clinical and biological problems into biomedical engineering frameworks and find ways to exploit a variety of modern techniques and approaches from photoacoustic imaging, fluorescence-guided surgery, micro-electromechanical systems and therapeutic delivery strategies in developing elegant and effective solutions. Her work in the Neurosurgery Department and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford involves research related to developing tumor-specific molecular probes, advanced imaging methods and therapeutic delivery systems for adult and pediatric patients with malignant brain cancers to improve margin detection, enhance resection accuracy, and improve treatment outcome.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.