School of Medicine


Showing 41-60 of 92 Results

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Tyler Johnson

    Tyler Johnson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Tyler Johnson is a physician, author, educator, and humanitarian. At the Stanford University School of Medicine, he has held an appointment as a clinical assistant professor for six years. A medical oncologist, Dr. Johnson sees patients with all types of gastrointestinal malignancies and particularly focuses on patients with neuroendocrine tumors, colon cancer, and pancreas cancer.

    Dr. Johnson also serves as a leader of the Stanford inpatient oncology services, including supervising the oncology housestaff service. He is responsible, in conjunction with other leaders, for multiple major improvements in the functioning of Stanford hospital.

    Dr. Johnson views the practice of medicine largely as an educational endeavor. To that end, for many years he has taught medical students, residents, and fellows—including hosting them as temporary and longer-term apprentices in his oncology clinic and working with them on the inpatient housestaff oncology service. He emphasizes diversity and inclusion in his mentoring efforts and has worked tirelessly to promote the professional development of medical trainees across the training spectrum--from undergraduates to oncology fellows.

    The winner of multiple Stanford Medicine teaching awards, Dr. Johnson has established himself as a regional and increasingly as a national leader and innovator in the education of oncology fellows, including by developing novel teaching methods that have been presented across the country, including at national meetings. He also heads the Stanford oncology department’s curricular development and as part of that had developed a novel curricular approach that centers the needs and teaching abilities of oncology fellows. He also works as one of the principal faculty members of the Stanford Educators-4-CARE program.

    Dr. Johnson and his co-host, Henry Bair, became concerned about the loss of a shared sense of meaning in the medical profession and, together, have taught multiple classes in the Medical School and, in the spring of 2022, founded The Doctor's Art podcast. Over the remainder of 2022, this podcast became one of the five most listened-to medical podcasts in the nation, with a growing national and international listenership.

    Finally, Dr. Johnson is an author with a growing reputation for insightful analysis of the intersection of medicine, ethics, and spirituality. His writings has been featured by Religion News Service, the Salt Lake Tribune, BYU Studies, Dialogue, and The San Jose Mercury News, where he is a regular contributor.

  • Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Khaki is a medical oncologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In his clinical practice, he treats patients with all forms of genitourinary cancer, including kidney, bladder, prostate, and testicular. He also regularly attends on the inpatient oncology service at Stanford Hospital.
    With each patient, he is devoted to providing exceptional, humanistic care and has been recognized throughout his career for his humanism. As a medical student, he was named to the national Gold Humanism Honor Society and he received the Reza Gandjei Humanism Award as a medical resident at UCSF.

    His research interests include novel therapies for genitourinary cancers, with a focus on urothelial cancer outcomes. He also has studied health care utilization and costs for end-of-life care of cancer patients.

    Dr. Khaki has earned honors and recognition from the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Conquer Cancer Foundation, and other organizations.

    He has authored numerous articles on topics such as immunotherapy for urothelial cancer, management of cancer patients with COVID-19, and utilization of end-of-life care by cancer patients. In addition, he is an editor for HemOnc.org and theMednet, a physician-only online community where members share clinical questions and answers.

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Khan is a fellowship-trained cancer specialist with board certification in oncology and hematology. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology.

    Dr. Khan focuses on the treatment of head and neck cancers, advanced thyroid cancers, and neuroendocrine tumors. He recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Khan’s research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as ways to reduce toxicities that some patients may experience when receiving cancer treatment. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy for aggressive thyroid cancer.

    He has published numerous articles on his research discoveries in peer-reviewed journals such as the JAMA Oncology, Investigational New Drugs, and others. Topics include new drug treatments for small cell lung cancer and for cancers of the head and neck, racial and gender disparities in certain types of cancer, and management of the potentially toxic effects of cancer therapies.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee. NRG brings together internationally recognized groups (the first words in their names form the acronym “NRG”) to conduct cancer clinical research and share study results. The objective is to inform clinical decision making and healthcare policy worldwide.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees. ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) is part of one of the five groups of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) Program.

    He also is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Central IRB for Early Phase Clinical Trials.

    When not providing patient care or conducting research, Dr. Khan enjoys spending time with his family, hiking, and relaxing at the beach.

  • Youn H Kim, MD

    Youn H Kim, MD

    The Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr., Professor for Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in cutaneous lymphomas, especially, mycosis fungoides; studies of prognostic factors, long-term survival results, and effects of therapies. Collaborative research with Departments of Pathology and Oncology in basic mechanisms of cutaneous lymphomas. Clinical trials of new investigative therapies for various dermatologic conditions or clinical trials of known therapies for new indications.

  • Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI aim to understand cancer burden and improve treatment quality at the population level. I have a strong focus on genetic risk assessment and precision oncology. I lead epidemiologic studies of cancer risk factors, clinical trials of novel approaches to cancer risk reduction, and decision analyses of strategies to optimize cancer outcomes.

  • David Kurtz

    David Kurtz

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 04/30/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImplementation of noninvasive detection of malignancies in the clinic remains difficult due to both technical and clinical challenges. These include necessary improvements in sensitivity and specificity of biomarkers, as well as demonstration of clinical utility of these assays. My research focuses on technical development and implementation of assays to detect and track cancers in order to facilitate personalized disease management.

  • Ronald Levy, MD

    Ronald Levy, MD

    Robert K. and Helen K. Summy Professor in the School of Medicine
    On Partial Leave from 05/16/2024 To 05/15/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: lymphoma. Research Interests: Immunology and molecular biology of lymphoid malignancy; molecular vaccines for cancer.

  • Michael Lim, M.D.

    Michael Lim, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy), of Medicine (Oncology), of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Neurology

    BioDr. Lim is the Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery and a board-certified neurosurgeon specializing in brain tumors and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Dr. Lim’s clinical interests include the treatment of benign and malignant brain tumors, with special interest in gliomas, meningiomas, metastatic tumors, and skull base tumors. Dr. Lim also specializes in surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. During his time at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Lim built one of the largest brain tumor and trigeminal neuralgia practices and utilized the most advanced surgical technologies and techniques for his patients. As a passionate voice for patient experience, he has been recognized by his peers and patients for his integrity and compassionate care, including a Service Excellence Award from HealthNetwork Foundation.

    As a mentor, he has garnered numerous teaching awards, including being honored as an outstanding teacher by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is actively involved in shaping education for neurosurgery and oncology across the United States and around the world. He is the recipient of the prestigious 2023 Abhijit Guha Award in Neuro-Oncology.

    Dr. Lim’s research interests focus on harnessing the immune system to fight cancer. His laboratory focuses on understanding mechanisms of immune evasion by cancer cells. He has successfully translated his findings from the laboratory to the clinics and has conducted and led several large national immunotherapy clinical trials for brain tumors.

    Dr. Lim’s bibliography contains well over 300 articles on topics such as immunotherapy for glioblastoma, long-term survival of glioma patients treated with stereotactic radiation, and treatment of neuropathic pain. His work has appeared in Science Translational Medicine, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet Oncology, Nature Immunology, and many more publications. He also has written 20 book chapters and monographs.

    Dr. Lim is a world leader in immunotherapy for brain tumors. In addition to being invited world-wide to give lectures and seminars, he has given platform presentations on the topics of immunotherapy for brain tumors, neurosurgical techniques and management of brain tumors at the American Society of Clinical Oncologists, American Academy of Neurological Surgeons, Radiological Society of North America, Annual Symposium on Brain and Spine Metastases, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and other meetings. In addition, he has served as platform chairman of the CNS session at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference.

    Dr. Lim is a member of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Society for Neuro-Oncology. Dr. Lim served as the program co-chair of the Society for Neuro-Oncology and CNS section of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. He also served on many executive committees, including the Executive Committee for the Joint Tumor Section of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  • Beverly S. Mitchell, M.D.

    Beverly S. Mitchell, M.D.

    George E. Becker Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBeverly Mitchell's research relates to the development of new therapies for hematologic malignancies, including leukemias and myelodsyplastic syndromes. She is interested in preclinical proof of principle studies on mechanisms inducing cell death and on metabolic targets involving nucleic acid biosynthesis in malignant cells. She is also interested in the translation of these studies into clinical trials.

  • Joel Neal, MD, PhD

    Joel Neal, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a thoracic oncologist who cares for patients with non-small cell lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, and other thoracic malignancies. I design and conduct clinical trials of novel therapies in collaboration with other researchers and pharmaceutical companies. These generally focus on two areas, 1) targeted therapies against particular mutations in cancers (for example EGFR, ALK, ROS1, HER2, KRAS, MET, and others) and 2) the emerging field of immunotherapy in cancer, using anti PD-1/PD-L1 therapies in combination with other agents, and also developing cellular therapies. I also collaborate with other researchers on campus to apply emerging technologies to cancer therapy, for example, circulating tumor DNA detection. Additionally, in my role as the Cancer Center IT Medical Director, I coordinate projects relating to our use of the electronic health record to improve provider efficiency and facilitate patient care.

  • Kim-Son Nguyen

    Kim-Son Nguyen

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Kim-Son H. Nguyen obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard College, with a concentration in genetics, his Doctor of Medicine from Harvard Medical School, and Master of Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government before becoming a faculty member of Harvard Medical School. He then completed his fellowship in hematology and oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Cancer Institute. While maintaining an active clinical practice at Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Dr. Nguyen is an adjunct clinical assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, with research interests including the molecular epidemiology of lung cancer, cancer screening, cancer therapeutics, and cancer care delivery.

    With a unique training and extensive experience in cancer genetics, clinical research, and public policy, Dr. Nguyen has been involved in improving cancer care globally for many years. A former director of the American Society of Clinical Oncology International Program in Vietnam, he is passionate about bringing the latest oncology knowledge to cancer-treating health care providers in resource-limited settings, improving cancer care in disadvantaged patient populations, and promoting clinical research in developing countries.