School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 64 Results

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Bereketeab Haileselassie

    Bereketeab Haileselassie

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory is focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms which mediate end-organ failure in pediatric sepsis. Our current work focuses on determining the role of altered mitochondrial dynamics in sepsis-induced multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Specifically, we focus on understanding the mechanisms that mediate derangements in mitochondrial fission and autophagy in sepsis.

  • Yang Hu, MD, PhD

    Yang Hu, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ultimate goal of the laboratory is to develop efficient therapeutic strategies to achieve CNS neural repair, through promoting neuroprotection, axon regeneration and functional recovery.

    More specifically, we study retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic nerve in various optic neuropathies including traumatic, glaucomatous and inflammatory optic nerve injuries to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of CNS neurodegeneration and axon regeneration failure.

  • Fumiaki Ikeno

    Fumiaki Ikeno

    Program Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign, Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioProgram Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign
    Researcher Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University
    Faculty of Japan Reach, CARE (Center for Asian Health Research and Education) , Stanford University
    Co-Director of Asia, SPARK Global, Stanford SPARK , Stanford University


    Dr. Ikeno is a Researcher, Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University. In this role, he is responsible for pre clinical studies including GLP for medical devices and also regenerative medicines for cardiovascular diseases. Currently, he is devoting himself to the international regulatory project between Japan and the United States, also known as "Harmonization by Doing", whose focus is to collaborate with regulatory agencies such as FDA, PMDA/MHLW, academia and industries for improving the regulatory process in the 2 largest medtech markets. Dr. Ikeno also devoted himself to found Japan biodesign program which is a collaborative program with University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tohoku University, Japan Federation Medical Device Association, Ministry of Education Japan and Stanford biodesign program. Currently, Dr. Ikeno serves as the Program Director (US) for Japan Biodesign. Dr. Ikeno is co-founder and board member of US-Japan MedTech Frontier which is a non-profit cooperate to make a trans-pacific eco-system of medical device between Japan and USA.

    After 9 years clinical practice as an interventional cardiologist and Family Doctor in rural areas of Japan, Dr. Ikeno came to Stanford as a Researcher and completed his Biodesign Certificate Program. Being part of the ecosystem in Silicon Valley, Dr. Ikeno participated in more than 200 medtech projects and 50 GLP studies as well as in the analysis of clinical trials for cardiovascular medicine (BARI2D, FAME, ReOPEN etc). His other academic consortium projects include Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, Global Consensus Working Group of Optical Coherence Tomography, and Japan-US consensus document for the treatment of critical limb ischemia.

    Over the last decade, Dr. Ikeno has served as an advisor for medical device industries and currently serves as a chief medical officer of an incubation fund specific for medtech (Medventure Partners, Inc, Tokyo) as a spin-off from Innovation Network Corporation of Japan (INCJ) that is the largest government and private partnership fund in Japan. He is also serving as a chair of cardiovascular working group of APAN (Asian Pacific Advanced Network) that contributes the remote education, research activities, and tele-health using a specialized internet network. Dr.Ikeno is also serving as consulting faculty/lecturer roles in several universities in Japan including University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tsukuba University etc. Dr. Ikeno has authored over 70 peer reviewed publications and textbooks and has been invited to lecture at international medical conferences. Dr. Ikeno is a council member of U.S.- Japan Council which is a non-profit organization by Japanese American. He is serving as a mentor for START-X MED which is an accelerating program for Stanford related entrepreneurs in medical fields.

    Contact Information


    Falk CVRC CV007
    300 Pasteur Drive
    Palo Alto, CA 94305-5406

  • Kathy Johnson

    Kathy Johnson

    Executive Adminstrator, SPARK at Stanford

    Current Role at StanfordProgram Administrator, SPARK at Stanford
    Executive Admin to:
    Daria Mochly-Rosen, Professor
    Kevin V. Grimes, Professor - Teaching
    Department of Chemical & Systems Biology