SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory


Showing 1-10 of 30 Results

  • Tom Abel

    Tom Abel

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and of Physics

    BioWhat were the first objects that formed in the Universe? Prof. Abel's group explores the first billion years of cosmic history using ab initio supercomputer calculations. He has shown from first principles that the very first luminous objects are very massive stars and has developed novel numerical algorithms using adaptive-mesh-refinement simulations that capture over 14 orders of magnitude in length and time scales. He currently continues his work on the first stars and first galaxies and their role in chemical enrichment and cosmological reionization. His group studies any of the first objects to form in the universe: first stars, first supernovae, first HII regions, first magnetic fields, first heavy elements, and so on. Most recently he is pioneering novel numerical algorithms to study collisionless fluids such as dark matter which makes up most of the mass in the Universe as well as astrophysical and terrestrial plasmas. He was the director of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Division Director at SLAC 2013-2018.

  • Alex Aiken

    Alex Aiken

    Alcatel-Lucent Professor in Communications and Networking and Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and of Photon Science

    BioAiken's research focuses on developing techniques for the construction of reliable software systems. His interests include both static and dynamic methods of analyzing programs, and span both detecting errors and verifying the absence of errors in software. Most of his research combines a theoretical component (for example, proving the soundness of an analysis technique) and a practical component, which often involves the implementation and measurement of advanced program analysis algorithms. Finally, his research also extends to the design of new programming languages and programming techniques in which it is easier to write software that can be checked for a wide variety of errors.

  • Daniel Akerib

    Daniel Akerib

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    BioResearch interests:
    Dan Akerib joined the department in 2014 with a courtesy appointment, in conjunction with a full-time appointment to the Particle Physics & Astrophysics faculty at SLAC. He has searched for WIMP dark matter particles since the early 1990s, first with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and more recently with the LUX and LUX-ZEPLIN projects. His current interests are in extending the sensitivity to dark matter through expanding and improving time projection chambers that use liquid xenon as a target medium. Together with Tom Shutt, he has led the establishment of a Liquid Nobles Test Platform at SLAC. The group specializes in detector development, xenon purification, and simulations, and has a broad range of opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students to participate in hardware and software development, as well as data analysis.

    Career History:
    - AB 1984, University of Chicago
    - Ph.D. 1990 Princeton University
    - Research Fellow, California Institute of Technology, 1990 - 1992
    - Center Fellow, Center for Particle Astrophysics, UC Berkeley 1993 - 1996
    - Assistant Professor, Case Western Reserve University, 1995-2001
    - Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, 2001-2004
    - Professor, Case Western Reserve University, 2004-2014
    - Chair, Case Western Reserve University, 2007-2010
    - Professor, Particle Physics & Astrophysics, SLAC 2014 - present

  • Steven Allen

    Steven Allen

    Professor of Physics and of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsObservational astrophysics and cosmology; galaxies, galaxy clusters, dark matter and dark energy; applications of statistical methods; X-ray astronomy; X-ray detector development; optical astronomy; mm-wave astronomy; radio astronomy; gravitational lensing.

  • Stanley Brodsky

    Stanley Brodsky

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    BioRecipient of the Watkins Physics Award and Visiting Professorship by the Watkins Foundations at Wichita State University in November, 2017.
    Awarded the International Pomeranchuk Prize for 2015.
    The Pomeranchuk Prize is a major international award for theoretical physics, awarded annually since 1998 by the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP)
    from Moscow to one international scientist and one Russian scientist, It is named after Russian physicist Isaak Yakovlevich Pomeranchuk, who together with Lev Landau,
    established the Theoretical Physics Department of the Institute. The Laureates for 2015 were Professor Victor Fadin and myself.
    Recipient of the 2007 J. J. Sakurai Prize in Theoretical Physics, awarded by the American Physical Society.
    Honorary degree of doctor scientiarum honoris causa (dr.scient.h.c.) from Southern Denmark University
    Alexander von Humboldt Distinguished U.S. Senior Scientist Award in 1987
    Chair of the Hadron Physics Topical Physics Group (GHP) of the American Physical Society, 2010.

  • Lance Dixon

    Lance Dixon

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in novel descriptions of how relativistic particles scattering, and how those insights can be applied to a variety of problems. Applications include precision QCD for the Large Hadron Collider; scattering in "toy models" such as N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory where an all orders solution seems feasible in the planar limit; the ultraviolet structure of quantum gravity; and problems in classical gravity such as gravitational radiation from compact binary inspiral.