SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory


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  • Paul McIntyre

    Paul McIntyre

    Rick and Melinda Reed Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Photon Science

    BioMcIntyre's group performs research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin dielectrics, defects in complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices.

  • Charles Titus

    Charles Titus

    Postdoc Res Affiliate, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    BioI am a graduate student in the Department of Physics at Stanford University. As part of the research group of Dr. Kent Irwin, I focus on the application of superconducting detectors to X-ray spectroscopy.

    Working at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), I operate a 240 pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array in support of a diverse user program at beamline 10-1. TES devices have emerged in the soft X-ray regime as moderate-resolution, high-throughput spectrometers that are particularly suited to measure dilute and damage-sensitive samples. My role as an instrumentation scientist has focused on fast data processing, instrument calibration, and ease-of-use for users.

    My research into spectroscopy focuses on using partial-fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe electronic structure in transition-metal complexes. Transition metals play a critical role in proteins such as hemoglobin and photosystem-II, catalysts, and batteries. In all of these systems, metals have a powerful ability to change oxidation states, store energy, and shuttle electrons around. X-ray spectroscopy allows us to directly probe the properties of transition metals that make them so useful for chemistry and biology.