Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-20 of 68 Results

  • Felipe Galvis-Delgado

    Felipe Galvis-Delgado

    Masters Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Spring 2023
    Master of Arts Student in International Policy, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioFelipe is an M.A. student in International Policy and an M.S. student in Environment and Resources. He focuses his studies on renewable energy development, electricity markets, climate finance, and the transition toward a clean energy economy in oil and gas dependent economies, such as his home communities of New Mexico and Colombia.

    Most recently, Felipe worked for Pattern Energy, an international renewable energy developer, during which he worked on utility-scale wind, solar, and storage projects, including SunZia, the largest renewable energy project in U.S. history. Prior to joining Stanford, Felipe spent five years in Washington D.C. working on policy in the U.S. Congress, where he worked on several policy issues including international affairs, homeland security and climate-agriculture. During this time, Felipe managed his boss’ work in several Senate Appropriations Subcommittees and in the House Homeland Security Committee. Felipe also drafted several pieces of legislation that ultimately were enacted into law. Outside of work, Felipe was an active member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute and the Congressional Hispanic Staff Association.

    Felipe holds a B.A. in International Relations and Politics from Pomona College, where he was also a four-year member of the men’s soccer team. During his time at Pomona, Felipe studied European politics and economics for a semester in Florence, Italy, and conducted field work in Budapest, Hungary for his senior thesis on right-wing populists’ exploitation of migration crises.

  • Angela Garcia

    Angela Garcia

    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    BioProfessor Garcia’s work engages historical and institutional processes through which violence and suffering is produced and lived. A central theme is the disproportionate burden of addiction, depression and incarceration among poor families and communities. Her research is oriented toward understanding how attachments, affect, and practices of intimacy are important registers of politics and economy.

    Garcia’s most recent book, The Way That Leads Among the Lost: Life, Death, and Hope in Mexico City's Anexos (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2024) examines how violence precedes and functions in the ways families seek to care for and protect each other. Central to this work are anexos (annexes), informal and coercive rehabilitation clinics for the treatment of drug addiction that are run and utilized by the working poor, and which incorporate violence into their therapeutic practices. Anexos are widespread across Mexico and are widely condemned as abusive, illegal, ineffective, and unethical. By situating anexos within a larger social and historical frame, and closely attending to life within and beyond these spaces, Garcia shows that anexos provide refuge from the catastrophic and everyday violence associated with the drug war. The book also demonstrates that anexos are the leading resource for the treatment of drug addiction among Mexico’s poor, and are an essential space of protection for individuals at risk of the intensifying violence in Mexico.

    Garcia's first book, The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along The Rio Grande (University of California Press, 2010) received awards in anthropology and writing. The Pastoral Clinic explores the relationship between intergenerational heroin use, poverty and colonial history in northern New Mexico. It argues that heroin addiction among Hispanos is a contemporary expression of an enduring history of dispossession, social and intimate fragmentation, and the existential desire for a release from these. Ongoing work in the U.S. explores processes of legal “re-entry” and intimate repair that incarcerated and paroled drug users undertake, particularly within kin networks.

    Currently, Garcia is studying the environmental, social, and bodily effects resulting from Mexico City’s ongoing desagüe, the massive drainage project initiated by Spanish colonists in the seventeenth century in the Valley of Mexico. Mexico City’s desagüe speaks to some of the most pressing concerns of our time: water scarcity, humans’ relationship to changing ecologies, and chronic disease. This project examines how the desagüe remakes bodies, neighborhoods, and social worlds.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Anchal Garg

    Anchal Garg

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioShe is an environmental researcher working on the negative implications of air pollution on human health and climate change. She has worked on monitoring, mapping, emission inventory, and identifying health hazards of Volatile Organic Compounds, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Particulate Matter present in the air. Anchal conducted extensive fieldwork, surveys, and cross-sectional studies to identify air quality and health-related data. Her current project is modeling and measuring the health consequences of indoor air pollutants formed during the combustion of stove gas in California.

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Senior Associate Dean, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Stanford (from 2015); Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford (from 2010); Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; Director, Stanford Yacht Research; Co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; Editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; Reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • Rwaida Gharib

    Rwaida Gharib

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Autumn 2023

    BioRwaida “Rudy” Gharib is pursuing her PhD in environment and resources at the Stanford School of Sustainability. Her research focuses on environmental justice and the policy changes/financing needed to support the climate adaptation and resilience of vulnerable populations—specifically, those living in rural poverty, women and girls, and im/migrants/refugees.