Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-10 of 52 Results

  • Areidy Aracely Beltran-Peña

    Areidy Aracely Beltran-Peña

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioAreidy Beltran-Peña is an Earth System Scientist and a Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellow. She leverages integrated assessment and Earth system models to investigate the global and regional impacts of climate change on water resources available for natural and human consumption. Overall, her research sheds light on the intricate dynamics impacting water and food security amid a changing climate, highlighting the importance of both global and regional analyses.

  • Steffen Buessecker

    Steffen Buessecker

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests revolve around the co-evolution of microbial life and Earth processes, the relation of these to the planetary climate, as well as astrobiology. In the spirit of SDSS, I am also passionate about seeking solutions for global climate change by focusing on greenhouse gas removal. I see high potential in the carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide consumption by enhanced mineral-microbial catalysis – processes that have been controlling gas fluxes since billions of years.

  • Paul Berne Burow

    Paul Berne Burow

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioI am a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. I am an interdisciplinary social-environmental scientist studying how human communities are impacted by environmental change. My work examines the cultural dynamics of environmental change in North America across scales using mixed methods from ethnography and archival research to field ecology and spatial analysis. My postdoctoral project explores the social dimensions and institutional effectiveness of collaborative forest stewardship with federal agencies and Native Nations in California.

    My previous work examined the social and cultural dimensions of environmental change in the North America's Great Basin. Based on thirty-six months of field-based ethnographic and historical research in California and Nevada, it investigated the cultural politics of land and its stewardship in dryland forest and shrub steppe ecosystems as it intersected with a changing climate, land use histories, and environmental governance regimes. Landscapes are undergoing material transformation due to climate change, land use practices, and settler colonialism, in turn reshaping how people relate to land, substantiate their place on it, and make claims to territory. This is creating new socioecological configurations of people, land, and place I call ecologies of belonging, the subject of my current book manuscript.

    Broadly, my research program addresses the sociocultural dimensions of climate and land use change, Indigenous environmental justice, and rural social inequality across North America. My areas of research and teaching interest include environmental anthropology, Indigenous environmental studies, ethnoecology, and human-environment geography. I am also engaged in community-based participatory research projects with Tribal Nations to expand Indigenous-led land stewardship and protect cultural landscapes from degradation for the benefit of future generations.

  • Christopher Callahan

    Christopher Callahan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioPersonal website (more frequently updated): https://christophercallahan.me