Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Katelyn Hettie McKown

    Katelyn Hettie McKown

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioKatelyn is a Lecturer in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) program. She earned a B.S. in Biology at Stanford and completed an honors thesis on her research in the Fire Lab using the nematode C. elegans to examine metal toxicity in the presence of the chelator, glyphosate. She went on to earn a Ph.D. in Genetics from the Stanford School of Medicine, studying stomatal development in the temperate grass model and smaller relative to wheat, Brachypodium distachyon, in the Bergmann Lab. Stomata are pores on the surfaces of leaves that regulate gas and water exchange. They are essential in managing the plant’s nutrient circulation, temperature, and water use efficiency, and therefore have important implications for drought tolerance. Katelyn’s research focused on characterizing members of a well-conserved transcription factor family involved in stomatal differentiation using genetic approaches to understand how grasses’ unique stomata are formed, including the creation of cross-species rescues to test for functional conservation across monocots and dicots.

    Katelyn is also passionate about science communication and teaching, and has organized science outreach events through outlets such as Stanford’s Splash, Taste of Science, and Nightlife at the Cal Academy; tutored at the Hume Writing Center and for the Biology honors thesis writing class; and served as an Indigenous research mentor for first year Native students in Frosh Fellows. When she’s not in the lab or classroom, Katelyn can be found gardening, fishing, playing board games, or exploring the great outdoors.

  • Shannon Hervey

    Shannon Hervey

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Cold War Literature and Culture, Popular American Literature and Culture, Young Adult Literature, Posthumanism, the Digital Humanities, Writing Pedagogy, and Multimodal Composition

  • Melissa A. Hosek

    Melissa A. Hosek

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioMelissa A. Hosek earned her Ph.D. in Chinese from the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. She specializes in modern Chinese literature with interests in environmental humanities, STS (science, technology, and society), and the digital humanities. Her dissertation, "The Ecological Imagination: Nature, Technology, and Criticism in Chinese Science Fiction: 1976-Today," examines how modern Chinese eco-perspectives are informed by and condition ideas about science and technology. She analyzes a wide range of notable science fiction films, novels, and short stories to argue that ideas about ecology are deeply entangled with ideas about scientific progress, but can also serve as a vehicle for critiquing scientific development.

    Melissa is also interested in higher education pedagogy and Chinese language teaching and learning. She earned certificates in Language Program Management and ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interviewing from Stanford's Language Center. She has taught classes in Mandarin Chinese, film studies, Chinese literature, and East Asian Studies. In the field of digital humanities, she has developed several projects and received the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities from Stanford's Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her other research interests include materialism, science fiction studies, critical theory, and nationalism.

  • Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    SLE Lecturer

    BioNura Hossainzadeh is a Lecturer in the Structured Liberal Education program and a political theorist by training. Her interest in political theory began when she was an undergraduate at Harvard, where she studied the canon of political theory—which begins in ancient Greece and ends in contemporary Europe and the U.S. After college, Nura moved to Qom, Iran, enrolling in an all-female Islamic seminary, Jami’at Al-Zahra, and taking courses in Islamic political thought and the Iranian revolution. She continued her study of both Western and Islamic political thought at UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in political science in 2016, writing her dissertation on a figure who not only wrote political theory but led an Islamic government—Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

    Nura’s current book project is entitled Islamic Republican: Ruhollah Khomeini’s Political Thought. Khomeini's thought became a primary resource for the writing of Iran’s Islamic constitution and continues to influence politics in contemporary Iran. Nura’s book examines all of Khomeini’s political works in the original Persian: his yet-untranslated book, published in 1943, The Unveiling of Secrets; his more widely read 1970 seminary lectures (later compiled into a book form), Islamic Government; and his post-revolutionary statements, speeches, and correspondence, contained in 11 volumes. The book concludes by investigating how contemporary Islamic thinkers engage Khomeini’s legacy and deploy it to justify or criticize democratic elements in Islamic governance.

    While pursuing research on Khomeini, Nura has taught a variety of courses on topics as diverse as American politics and government, feminist thought, canonical and non-Western political theory, Iranian and Middle East politics, and legal theory.

  • Brittany S. Hull

    Brittany S. Hull

    Lecturer

    BioBorn and raised in Chester, PA.
    Proud graduate of THE 1ST HBCU, Lincoln University.
    A firm believer that ALL lives can't matter until ALL BLACK lives do.
    I drink my water and mind my business.

  • Charlotte Hull

    Charlotte Hull

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioCharlotte Hull is a Lecturer for Civil, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). She earned her Ph.D. from the Stanford Department of History, where she researched the intersection of space, politics, and imperial power in nineteenth-century North America. She earned her undergraduate degree from University of California Berkeley, double majoring in English literature and history with a focus in poetry, the Atlantic world, and the colonial Americas. As a Haas Scholar at Berkeley, Charlotte examined the first generations of English settlement on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, exploring how Islanders––both Wampanoag and English––created new autonomous systems outside of regional and imperial power structures during the mid-seventeenth century. Her thesis received the Highest Honors in History, and her research led her to pursue a graduate degree as a Beinecke Scholar.

    At Stanford, Charlotte has investigated connections between the Atlantic and Pacific worlds as well as the creation of social and political institutions in California and the Hawaiian Islands. Her dissertation, "Connecting California: Agents of U.S. Imperial Expansion, 1783-1848," investigates how and why California became part of the United States in the mid-nineteenth century. The dissertation tracks how the idea of California changed in the minds of U.S. statesmen over the course of multiple administrations and how U.S. agents in the field built the cartographic, diplomatic, and military infrastructure of the American Empire over 70 years. Her research demonstrates how mapping expeditions and attempts at diplomacy ultimately led to military campaigns for U.S. sovereignty over Alta California. Her research has been supported by the U.C. Berkeley History Department, the Haas Scholars Program at U.C. Berkeley, the Beinecke Scholarship Program, the Stanford Department of History, and the Dee family through The Bill Lane Center for the American West.

    Charlotte has taught a wide range of courses at Stanford, including courses in history, interdisciplinary humanities, research-based writing, the writing tutor training seminars for the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking, and graduate-level pedagogy courses. She has recently partnered with the Stanford Career Center and the School of Humanities and Sciences Dean's Office to co-develop a pilot course for humanities PhD students in career exploration. Charlotte has also served as Director of the Honors Mentorship Program in History, Graduate Writing Tutor Coordinator for the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking, Co-coordinator for the U.S. History Workshop, and Writing & Humanities Area Coordinator for the Stanford Summer Academic Resource Center.

  • Michaela Hulstyn

    Michaela Hulstyn

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMichaela Hulstyn is a Lecturer in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), a first-year residential education program at Stanford University.

    Her first monograph, _Unselfing: Global French Literature at the Limits of Consciousness_, is forthcoming with the University of Toronto Press in 2022. Her research interests center on 20th- and 21st-century French and Francophone literature, phenomenology of the self and intersubjectivity, cognitive approaches to transcultural literature, and literature as ethical philosophy. Her work has appeared in MLN, Philosophy and Literature, and Contemporary French and Francophone Studies, among other places.

    She previously held academic appointments at Florida State University and Reed College.