Clinical Focus


  • Ped Hematology/Oncology
  • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship: Stanford University Pediatric Hematology Oncology Fellowship (2009) CA
  • Residency: United States Naval Medical Center San Diego Pediatric Residency (2003) CA
  • Medical Education: New York Medical College Registrar (1998) NY
  • Board Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (2011)
  • Board Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, Pediatrics (2003)

Clinical Trials


  • A Phase 2 Study of Ruxolitinib With Chemotherapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Recruiting

    This is a nonrandomized study of ruxolitinib in combination with a standard multi-agent chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Part 1 of the study will optimize the dose of study drug (ruxolitinib) in combination with the chemotherapy regimen. Part 2 will evaluate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy and ruxolitinib at the recommended dose determined in Part 1.

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  • A Study to Investigate Blinatumomab in Combination With Chemotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia Recruiting

    This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.

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  • Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Carboplatin, Etoposide, or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients With Germ Cell Tumors Recruiting

    This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

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  • Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement Recruiting

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.

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  • Biospecimen Analysis in Determining Effects of Chemotherapy on Fertility in Osteosarcoma Survivors Recruiting

    This research trial studies saliva, semen, and blood samples to determine effects of chemotherapy on fertility in osteosarcoma survivors. Study biospecimen samples from osteosarcoma survivors in the laboratory may help doctors learn whether chemotherapy causes fertility problems and to learn more about the long term effects.

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  • Cisplatin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children and Young Adults With Hepatoblastoma or Liver Cancer After Surgery Recruiting

    This partially randomized phase II/III trial studies how well, in combination with surgery, cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than one type of chemotherapy alone.

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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Intermediate Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (vincristine sulfate, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide alternated with vincristine sulfate and irinotecan hydrochloride or vinorelbine) works compared to combination chemotherapy plus temsirolimus in treating patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (cancer that forms in the soft tissues, such as muscle), and has an intermediate chance of coming back after treatment (intermediate risk). Drugs used work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Combination chemotherapy and temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy plus temsirolimus is more effective than chemotherapy alone in treating patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma.

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  • Genetic Analysis in Identifying Late-Occurring Complications in Childhood Cancer Survivors Recruiting

    This clinical trial studies cancer survivors to identify those who are at increased risk of developing late-occurring complications after undergoing treatment for childhood cancer. A patient's genes may affect the risk of developing complications, such as congestive heart failure, avascular necrosis, stroke, and second cancer, years after undergoing cancer treatment. Genetic studies may help doctors identify survivors of childhood cancer who are more likely to develop late complications.

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  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy Recruiting

    This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.

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  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Younger Patients With B-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory CD22 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with B-lymphoblastic lymphoma or CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.

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  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma Recruiting

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.

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  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies Recruiting

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

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  • Neuropsychological and Behavioral Testing in Younger Patients With Cancer Recruiting

    This research trial studies neuropsychological (learning, remembering or thinking) and behavioral outcomes in children and adolescents with cancer by collecting information over time from a series of tests.

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  • Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Sarcomas Recruiting

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with or without ipilimumab to see how well they work in treating younger patients with solid tumors or sarcomas that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether nivolumab works better alone or with ipilimumab in treating patients with recurrent or refractory solid tumors or sarcomas.

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  • Reduced Craniospinal Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed WNT-Driven Medulloblastoma Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced doses of radiation therapy to the brain and spine (craniospinal) and chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed type of brain tumor called WNT)/Wingless (WNT)-driven medulloblastoma. Recent studies using chemotherapy and radiation therapy have been shown to be effective in treating patients with WNT-driven medulloblastoma. However, there is a concern about the late side effects of treatment, such as learning difficulties, lower amounts of hormones, or other problems in performing daily activities. Radiotherapy uses high-energy radiation from x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide and lomustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving reduced craniospinal radiation therapy and chemotherapy may kill tumor cells and may also reduce the late side effects of treatment.

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  • Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma Recruiting

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.

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  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients With Down Syndrome Recruiting

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

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  • Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients Recruiting

    This research trial studies kidney tumors in younger patients. Collecting and storing samples of tumor tissue, blood, and urine from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

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  • Study Of Palbociclib Combined With Chemotherapy In Pediatric Patients With Recurrent/Refractory Solid Tumors Recruiting

    This study will evaluate palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy (temozolomide with irinotecan and/or topotecan with cyclophosphamide) in children, adolescents and young adults with recurrent or refractory solid tumors. The main purpose of phase 1 portion of this study is to evaluate the safety of palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy in order to estimate the maximum tolerated dose. The main purpose of phase 2 portion is to compare the efficacy of palbociclib in combination with irinotecan and temozolomide vs irinotecan and temozolomide alone in the treatment of children, adolescents, and young adults with recurrent or refractory Ewing sarcoma (EWS). Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy will be evaluated.

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  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Pediatric Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders (The Pediatric MATCH Screening Trial) Recruiting

    This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

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  • Trametinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well trametinib works in treating patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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  • Accelerated v's Standard BEP Chemotherapy for Patients With Intermediate and Poor-risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumours Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether accelerated BEP chemotherapy is more effective than standard BEP chemotherapy in males with intermediate and poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumours.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Immunotherapy with blinatumomab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

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  • Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors Not Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Sheri L. Spunt, 650-498-7061.

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  • Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated, High-Risk Medulloblastoma/PNET Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies different chemotherapy and radiation therapy regimens to compare how well they work in treating young patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated, high-risk medulloblastoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Carboplatin may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. It is not yet known which chemotherapy and radiation therapy regimen is more effective in treating brain tumors.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Carissa Bailey, (650) 725 - 4708.

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  • Combination Chemotherapy, Autologous Stem Cell Transplant, and/or Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Extraocular Retinoblastoma Not Recruiting

    This phase III trial is studying the side effects and how well giving combination chemotherapy together with autologous stem cell transplant and/or radiation therapy works in treating young patients with extraocular retinoblastoma. Giving chemotherapy before an autologous stem cell transplant stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient?s blood and/or bone marrow and stored. More chemotherapy is given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving radiation therapy after combination chemotherapy and/or autologous stem cell transplant may kill any remaining tumor cells.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Lan Wang, (650) 723 - 5535.

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  • Combination Chemotherapy, PEG-Interferon Alfa-2b, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Osteosarcoma Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial is studying combination chemotherapy followed by surgery and two different combination chemotherapy regimens with or without PEG-interferon alfa-2b to compare how well they work in treating patients with osteosarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Biological therapies, such as PEG-interferon alfa-2b, may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may shrink the tumor so it can be removed. Giving combination chemotherapy together with PEG-interferon alfa-2b after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving combination therapy together with PEG-interferon alfa-2b is more effective than two different combination chemotherapy regimens alone after surgery in treating osteosarcoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Min Wang, (650) 736 - 4281.

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  • Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Temozolomide, and Dinutuximab With or Without Eflornithine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma Not Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab work with or without eflornithine in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or that isn't responding to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Eflornithine blocks the production of chemicals called polyamines that are important in the growth of cancer cells. Giving eflornithine with irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab, may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Site Public Contact, 800-694-0012.

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  • Palbociclib in Combination With Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (LL) Not Recruiting

    AINV18P1 is a Phase 1 study where palbociclib will be administrated in combination with a standard re-induction platform in pediatric relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL). LL patients are included because the patient population is rare and these patients are most commonly treated with ALL regimens. The proposed palbociclib starting dose for this study will be 50 mg/m^2/day for 21 days.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Jay Michael S. Balagtas, MD, 650-723-5535.

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  • Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Peds Hem Onc CRAs, 650-723-5535.

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  • Rituximab and LMP-Specific T-Cells in Treating Pediatric Solid Organ Recipients With EBV-Positive, CD20-Positive Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Not Recruiting

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well rituximab and latent membrane protein (LMP)-specific T-cells work in treating pediatric solid organ recipients with Epstein-Barr virus-positive, cluster of differentiation (CD)20-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. LMP-specific T-cells are special immune system cells trained to recognize proteins found on post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder tumor cells if they are infected with Epstein-Barr virus. Giving rituximab and LMP-specific T-cells may work better in treating pediatric organ recipients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder than rituximab alone.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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  • Selumetinib Sulfate in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Activating MAPK Pathway Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial) Not Recruiting

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well selumetinib sulfate works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with MAPK pathway activation mutations that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Selumetinib sulfate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

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  • Veliparib, Radiation Therapy, and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma Without H3 K27M or BRAFV600 Mutations Not Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well veliparib, radiation therapy, and temozolomide work in treating patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma without H3 K27M or BRAFV600 mutations. Poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerases (PARPs) are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as veliparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib, radiation therapy, and temozolomide may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma without H3 K27M or BRAFV600 mutations compared to radiation therapy and temozolomide alone.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Site Public Contact, 800-694-0012.

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  • Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention in Improving Long Term Health in Children and Adolescents With Cancer Not Recruiting

    This randomized clinical phase III trial studies how well web-based physical activity intervention works in improving long term health in children and adolescents with cancer. Regular physical activity after receiving treatment for cancer may help to maintain a healthy weight and improve energy levels and overall health.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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2021-22 Courses


All Publications


  • A challenging case of recurrent idiopathic hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) initially presenting in an infant with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia Solomon, B., Balagtas, J., Chien, M., Pooni, R., Balboni, I., Weinacht, K., Gernez, Y. SPRINGER/PLENUM PUBLISHERS. 2021: S55
  • P3BEP (ANZUP 1302): An international randomized phase III trial of accelerated versus standard BEP chemotherapy for male and female adults and children with intermediate and poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors (GCTs). Subramaniam, S., Toner, G. C., Stockler, M. R., Martin, A., Pashankar, F. D., Tran, B., Jeffery, M., Mazhar, D., Huddart, R. A., Walpole, E., Stevanovic, A., Wyld, D., Hanning, F. J., Wheater, M., Balagtas, J. R., Troon, S., Birtle, A., White, J. D., Grimison, P. S., Australian New Zealand Urogenital LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2021
  • The identification of at-risk patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism in pediatric cancer: guidance from the SSC of the ISTH JOURNAL OF THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS Tullius, B. P., Athale, U., Van Ommen, C. H., Chan, A. C., Palumbo, J. S., Balagtas, J. S., Subcomm Hemostasis & Malignan, Subcomm Pediat Neonatal Throm 2018; 16 (1): 175–80

    View details for DOI 10.1111/jth.13895

    View details for Web of Science ID 000419402000023

    View details for PubMedID 29178421

  • Rate of abnormal vaginal bleeding and contraception counseling in women undergoing chemotherapy JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY AND SUPPORTIVE ONCOLOGY Cutler, K. E., Creinin, M. D., Balagtas, J. S., Hou, M. Y. 2016; 14 (8): 337–41

    View details for DOI 10.12788/jcso.0290

    View details for Web of Science ID 000398367400004

  • Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma: Pediatric Case Series Demonstrating Heterogeneous Presentation and Option for Watchful Waiting PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER Johnston, E. E., LeBlanc, R. E., Kim, J., Chung, J., Balagtas, J., Kim, Y. H., Link, M. P. 2015; 62 (11): 2025-2028

    Abstract

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) and primary cutaneous gamma delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGD-TCL) were initially both classified as subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma. In 2008, SPTCL with alpha-beta T-cell receptor subtype was separated from primary cutaneous gamma delta T-cell lymphomas (PCGD-TCL). We report four pediatric cases that demonstrate the heterogeneity of each disease and show that PCGD-TCL in children can have an indolent course, whereas SPTCL can behave aggressively. Three patients had spontaneous, durable remissions without treatment, whereas the one patient with disease progression was treated successfully. Watchful waiting may thus be appropriate for initial management of children.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/pbc.25626

    View details for PubMedID 26146844

  • Breakpoint analysis of transcriptional and genomic profiles uncovers novel gene fusions spanning multiple human cancer types. PLoS genetics Giacomini, C. P., Sun, S., Varma, S., Shain, A. H., Giacomini, M. M., Balagtas, J., Sweeney, R. T., Lai, E., Del Vecchio, C. A., Forster, A. D., Clarke, N., Montgomery, K. D., Zhu, S., Wong, A. J., van de Rijn, M., West, R. B., Pollack, J. R. 2013; 9 (4)

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003464

    View details for PubMedID 23637631

  • Therapeutic Complications in a Patient With High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Undiagnosed Hereditary Hemochromatosis PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER Balagtas, J. M., Dahl, G. V. 2012; 58 (1): 101-103

    Abstract

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of iron metabolism that most commonly manifests in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Here, we describe a 14-year-old male who presented with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia and previously undiagnosed HH. His treatment course was remarkable for significant therapeutic complications, including iron overload, hepatic failure, cardiac dysfunction, and death. Postmortem testing revealed homozygosity for the C282Y mutation, confirming the diagnosis of HH. Since HH mutations occur commonly in select populations, screening patients with leukemia for HH may better inform treatment decisions regarding chemotherapy, transfusions, and/or iron chelation therapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/pbc.22829

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297641300020

    View details for PubMedID 22076832

  • Liposomal amphotericin B associated with severe hyperphosphatemia PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL Sutherland, S. M., Hong, D. K., Balagtas, J., Gutierrez, K., Dvorak, C. C., Sarwal, M. 2008; 27 (1): 77-79

    Abstract

    We report 4 patients who developed hyperphosphatemia while receiving liposomal amphotericin B to treat an invasive fungal infection. Resolution of the hyperphosphatemia occurred after transition to amphotericin B lipid complex. This phenomenon may occur more commonly in patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/INF.0b013e31815922a3

    View details for PubMedID 18162947