Bio


Jonathan Rodden is a professor in the political science department at Stanford who works on the comparative political economy of institutions. He has written several articles and three books on federalism and fiscal decentralization. One of those books, "Hamilton’s Paradox: The Promise and Peril of Fiscal Federalism," was the recipient of the Gregory Luebbert Prize for the best book in comparative politics in 2007. He works with institutions including the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, USAID, and the European Parliament on issues related to fiscal decentralization and federalism.

He has also written papers on the geographic distribution of political preferences within countries, legislative bargaining, the distribution of budgetary transfers across regions, and the historical origins of political institutions. He has written a series of papers applying tools from mathematics and computer science to questions about redistricting, culminating in a 2019 book called "Why Cities Lose: The Deep Roots of the Urban-Rural Political Divide" (Basic Books). Rodden has also embarked on an inter-disciplinary collaborative project focused on handgun acquisition.

Rodden received his PhD from Yale University and his BA from the University of Michigan, and was a Fulbright student at the University of Leipzig, Germany. Before joining the Stanford faculty in 2007, he was the Ford Associate Professor of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Other Affiliation:
Director of the Spatial Social Science Lab at Stanford

Academic Appointments


2020-21 Courses


Stanford Advisees


  • Doctoral Dissertation Reader (AC)
    Hans Lueders, William Marble, Christiana Parreira, Luis Rodriguez, Emily Zhang
  • Doctoral (Program)
    Cole Tanigawa-Lau

All Publications


  • Hybrid Regimes within Democracies: Fiscal Federalism and Subnational Rentier States. (Book Review) PERSPECTIVES ON POLITICS Book Review Authored by: Rodden, J. 2020; 18 (1): 293–95
  • Assembly of the LongSHOT cohort: public record linkage on a grand scale. Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention Zhang, Y., Holsinger, E. E., Prince, L., Rodden, J. A., Swanson, S. A., Miller, M. M., Wintemute, G. J., Studdert, D. M. 2019

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Virtually all existing evidence linking access to firearms to elevated risks of mortality and morbidity comes from ecological and case-control studies. To improve understanding of the health risks and benefits of firearm ownership, we launched a cohort study: the Longitudinal Study of Handgun Ownership and Transfer (LongSHOT).METHODS: Using probabilistic matching techniques we linked three sources of individual-level, state-wide data in California: official voter registration records, an archive of lawful handgun transactions and all-cause mortality data. There were nearly 28.8 million unique voter registrants, 5.5 million handgun transfers and 3.1 million deaths during the study period (18 October 2004 to 31 December 2016). The linkage relied on several identifying variables (first, middle and last names; date of birth; sex; residential address) that were available in all three data sets, deploying them in a series of bespoke algorithms.RESULTS: Assembly of the LongSHOT cohort commenced in January 2016 and was completed in March 2019. Approximately three-quarters of matches identified were exact matches on all link variables. The cohort consists of 28.8million adult residents of California followed for up to 12.2 years. A total of 1.2million cohort members purchased at least one handgun during the study period, and 1.6million died.CONCLUSIONS: Three steps taken early may be particularly useful in enhancing the efficiency of large-scale data linkage: thorough data cleaning; assessment of the suitability of off-the-shelf data linkage packages relative to bespoke coding; and careful consideration of the minimum sample size and matching precision needed to support rigorous investigation of the study questions.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043385

    View details for PubMedID 31662345

  • Geography, Uncertainty, and Polarization POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH AND METHODS Mccarty, N., Rodden, J., Shor, B., Tausanovitch, C., Warshaw, C. 2019; 7 (4): 775–94
  • Crowdsourcing accountability: ICT for service delivery WORLD DEVELOPMENT Grossman, G., Platas, M. R., Rodden, J. 2018; 112: 74–87
  • Handgun Acquisitions in California After Two Mass Shootings ANNALS OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Studdert, D. M., Zhang, Y., Rodden, J. A., Hyndman, R. J., Wintemute, G. J. 2017; 166 (10): 698-?

    Abstract

    Mass shootings are common in the United States. They are the most visible form of firearm violence. Their effect on personal decisions to purchase firearms is not well-understood.To determine changes in handgun acquisition patterns after the mass shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 and San Bernardino, California, in 2015.Time-series analysis using seasonal autoregressive integrated moving-average (SARIMA) models.California.Adults who acquired handguns between 2007 and 2016.Excess handgun acquisitions (defined as the difference between actual and expected acquisitions) in the 6-week and 12-week periods after each shooting, overall and within subgroups of acquirers.In the 6 weeks after the Newtown and San Bernardino shootings, there were 25 705 (95% prediction interval, 17 411 to 32 788) and 27 413 (prediction interval, 15 188 to 37 734) excess acquisitions, respectively, representing increases of 53% (95% CI, 30% to 80%) and 41% (CI, 19% to 68%) over expected volume. Large increases in acquisitions occurred among white and Hispanic persons, but not among black persons, and among persons with no record of having previously acquired a handgun. After the San Bernardino shootings, acquisition rates increased by 85% among residents of that city and adjacent neighborhoods, compared with 35% elsewhere in California.The data relate to handguns in 1 state. The statistical analysis cannot establish causality.Large increases in handgun acquisitions occurred after these 2 mass shootings. The spikes were short-lived and accounted for less than 10% of annual handgun acquisitions statewide. Further research should examine whether repeated shocks of this kind lead to substantial increases in the prevalence of firearm ownership.None.

    View details for DOI 10.7326/M16-1574

    View details for Web of Science ID 000401240200013

    View details for PubMedID 28462425

  • The Achilles Heel of Plurality Systems: Geography and Representation in Multiparty Democracies AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Calvo, E., Rodden, J. 2015; 59 (4): 789-805

    View details for DOI 10.1111/ajps.12167

    View details for Web of Science ID 000362601200001

  • Why Has US Policy Uncertainty Risen Since 1960? AMERICAN ECONOMIC REVIEW Baker, S. R., Bloom, N., Canes-Wrone, B., Davis, S. J., Rodden, J. 2014; 104 (5): 56-60
  • Unintentional Gerrymandering: Political Geography and Electoral Bias in Legislatures QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Chen, J., Rodden, J. 2013; 8 (3): 239-269
  • How Should We Measure District-Level Public Opinion on Individual Issues? JOURNAL OF POLITICS Warshaw, C., Rodden, J. 2012; 74 (1): 203-219
  • Dual accountability and the nationalization of party competition: Evidence from four federations PARTY POLITICS Rodden, J., Wibbels, E. 2011; 17 (5): 629-653
  • Representation and redistribution in federations PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Dragu, T., Rodden, J. 2011; 108 (21): 8601-8604

    Abstract

    Many of the world's most populous democracies are political unions composed of states or provinces that are unequally represented in the national legislature. Scattered empirical studies, most of them focusing on the United States, have discovered that overrepresented states appear to receive larger shares of the national budget. Although this relationship is typically attributed to bargaining advantages associated with greater legislative representation, an important threat to empirical identification stems from the fact that the representation scheme was chosen by the provinces. Thus, it is possible that representation and fiscal transfers are both determined by other characteristics of the provinces in a specific country. To obtain an improved estimate of the relationship between representation and redistribution, we collect and analyze provincial-level data from nine federations over several decades, taking advantage of the historical process through which federations formed and expanded. Controlling for a variety of country- and province-level factors and using a variety of estimation techniques, we show that overrepresented provinces in political unions around the world are rather dramatically favored in the distribution of resources.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1019061108

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290908000022

    View details for PubMedID 21555553

  • FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION AND THE BUSINESS CYCLE: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF SEVEN FEDERATIONS ECONOMICS & POLITICS Rodden, J., Wibbels, E. 2010; 22 (1): 37-67
  • The Geographic Distribution of Political Preferences ANNUAL REVIEW OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, VOL 13 Rodden, J. 2010; 13: 321-340
  • The strength of issues: Using multiple measures to gauge preference stability, ideological constraint, and issue voting AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE REVIEW Ansolabehere, S., Rodden, J., Snyder, J. M. 2008; 102 (2): 215-232
  • Does religion distract the poor? Income and issue voting around the world COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES De La O, A. L., Rodden, J. A. 2008; 41 (4-5): 437-476