Bio


Dr. Yemane serves in numerous local and national roles related to equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) and mentorship. Dr. Yemane's scholarship focuses on building and evaluating innovative diversity programs and studying barriers and facilitators for inclusion and retention of underrepresented in medicine (UIM) trainees. She is one of the founding co-directors for the Stanford Medicine Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity (LEAD) Program, which is a 10-month longitudinal leadership program for residents and fellows across GME to develop leadership and scholarship skills in addressing issues related to EDI, to produce leaders in academic medicine dedicated to EDI, and to improve the culture of medicine. She is also the founding director of the Association of Pediatric Program Directors’ Advancing Inclusiveness in Medical Education Scholars (AIMS) Program, which is a national mentorship and professional development program for UIM pediatric residents interested in careers in pediatric medical education leadership.

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics
  • General Pediatrics

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Assistant Dean, Diversity in Graduate Medical Education, Office of Diversity in Medical Education, Stanford School of Medicine (2021 - Present)
  • Associate Program Director, Recruitment, Diversity and Inclusion, Pediatrics Residency Program (2018 - Present)
  • Co-Director, LEAD (Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity) Program, Stanford School of Medicine (2018 - Present)
  • Associate Program Director, Advising and Career Development, Pediatrics Residency Program (2016 - Present)
  • Interim Medical Director, Gardner Packard Children’s Health Center (2015 - 2017)

Honors & Awards


  • Equity Matters: DEI (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion) Leadership Certification, ACGME (2021-present)
  • President’s Award for Excellence Through Diversity, Stanford Medicine LEAD Program, Stanford University (2020)
  • Institutional Leadership Award, Stanford Medicine LEAD Program, Building the Next Generation of Academic Physicians (BNGAP) (2020)
  • Diversity, Respect, and Inclusion are Vital for Excellence (DRIVE) Award, Stanford Department of Pediatrics (2019)
  • Educational Scholars Program, Academic Pediatric Association (2018-present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Co-Chair, SPAARC (Stanford Pediatrics: Advancing Anti-Racism Coalition), Stanford School of Medicine (2020 - Present)
  • Director, AIMS (Advancing Inclusiveness in Medical Education Scholars) Program, Association of Pediatric Program Directors (2020 - Present)
  • Faculty Senator, Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine (2018 - Present)
  • Member, Diversity and Inclusion Subcommittee, Academic Pediatric Association (2018 - Present)
  • Chair, Underrepresented Minorities in Pediatric GME Learning Community, Association of Pediatric Program Directors (2018 - 2020)
  • Member, Academic Pediatric Association (2017 - Present)
  • Member, Association of Pediatric Program Directors (2015 - Present)
  • Member, American Academy of Pediatrics (2010 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Chief Residency, Stanford Pediatrics Residency (2014)
  • Board Certification, Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2013)
  • Residency, Stanford Pediatrics Residency (2013)
  • Medical Degree, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (2010)
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Texas at Austin, Human Biology (2006)

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


MedEd, diverse workforce, belonging and professional identity in UIM trainee

All Publications


  • Trends in Race/Ethnicity of Pediatric Residents and Fellows: 2007-2019. Pediatrics Montez, K., Omoruyi, E. A., McNeal-Trice, K., Mack, W. J., Yemane, L., Darden, A. R., Russell, C. J. 2021

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A diverse pediatric workforce reflecting the racial/ethnic representation of the US population is an important factor in eliminating health inequities. Studies reveal minimal improvements over time in the proportions of underrepresented in medicine (URiM) physicians; however, studies assessing trends in pediatric URiM trainee representation are limited. Our objective was to evaluate longitudinal trends in racial/ethnic representation among a cross-section of US pediatric trainees and to compare it to the US population.METHODS: Repeated cross-sectional study of graduate medical education census data on self-reported race/ethnicity of pediatric residents and subspecialty fellows from 2007 to 2019. To evaluate trends in URiM proportions over time , the Cochran-Armitage test was performed. Data on self-reported race/ethnicity of trainees were compared with the general population data over time by using US Census Bureau data.RESULTS: Trends in URiM proportions were unchanged in residents (16% in 2007 to 16.5% in 2019; P = .98) and, overall, decreased for fellows (14.2% in 2007 to 13.5% in 2019; P = .002). URiM fellow trends significantly decreased over time in neonatal-perinatal medicine (P < .001), infectious diseases (P < .001), and critical care (P = .006) but significantly increased in endocrinology (P = .002) and pulmonology (P = .009). Over time, the percentage of URiM pediatric trainee representation was considerably lower compared to the US population.CONCLUSIONS: The continued underrepresentation of URiM pediatric trainees may perpetuate persistent health inequities for minority pediatric populations. There is a critical need to recruit and retain pediatric URiM residents and subspecialty fellows.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2020-026666

    View details for PubMedID 34131043