Bio


Roy Pea is David Jacks Professor of Education & Learning Sciences at Stanford University, School of Education, and Computer Science (Courtesy), and Director of the H-STAR Institute, Wallenberg Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg. 160, Stanford, CA 94305; roypea@stanford.edu. His studies and publications in the learning sciences focus on advancing theories, research, tools and social practices of technology-enhanced learning of complex domains, including his role as Co-Director and Co-PI of the NSF-funded LIFE Center, which seeks to develop and test principles about the social foundations of human learning in informal and formal environments with the goal of enhancing human learning from infancy to adulthood. He is also founder and Director of Stanford’s PhD program in Learning Sciences and Technology Design. He is co-author of the 2010 National Education Technology Plan for the US Department of Education, co-editor of Video Research in the Learning Sciences (2007), and co-author of the National Academy of Sciences book: How People Learn (2000). He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Education, Association for Psychological Science, the American Educational Research Association, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. In 2004-2005, Roy was President of the International Society for the Learning Sciences. Roy served from 1999-2009 as a Director for Teachscape, a teacher professional development services company he co-founded with CEO Mark Atkinson.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director, H-STAR Institute (Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research) (2007 - Present)
  • Director, Learning Sciences and Technology Design Doctoral Program, Stanford Graduate School of Education (2001 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Rhodes Scholarship, University of Oxford (1974-1977)
  • NIMH Postdoctoral Fellowship in Experimental Psychology, Rockefeller University (1978-1980)
  • Schumann Fellowship, Harvard University Graduate School of Education (1986-1987)
  • Spencer Foundation Award to Young Scholars, New York University (1987)
  • Accelerating Innovation Award, Apple Computer, Advanced Technology Group (1990)
  • Fellow, Developmental Psychology, Association for Psychological Science (1995)
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1995-1996)
  • Visiting Fellow, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (2008-2009)
  • Faculty Research Award, IBM (2005-2006)
  • Fellow, World Technology Network Award (2002)
  • Fellow, National Academy of Education (2002)
  • President, International Society for the Learning Sciences (2004-2005)
  • Fellow, American Educational Research Association (2008)
  • Best Paper Award: "Collaboration Sensing" (with Schneider, B., Abu-El-Haija, S., Reesman, J.), Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK13) (2013)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Advisory Board, Education and Human Resources Directorate, National Science Foundation (2012 - Present)
  • Executive Committee, Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR) (2013 - Present)
  • National Advisory Board, Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop (2010 - Present)
  • NSF Task Force for Cyberlearning and Workforce Development, National Science Foundation (2010 - 2011)
  • Advisory Board, Kno.com (2010 - Present)
  • Advisory Board, STELLAR Network (2010 - 2013)
  • International Scientific Advisory Board, CICERO Learning Network, Finland (2007 - 2012)

Program Affiliations


  • Symbolic Systems Program

Professional Education


  • D.Phil., Oxon., University of Oxford, England, Developmental Psychology (1978)
  • Bachelor of Arts, Michigan State University, "Cognition" - Dual Major in Philosophy, Psychology, Minor in Linguistics (Highest Honors ) (1974)

Patents


  • Patton, C., Roschelle, J., Pea, R.D., & Vahey, P.. "United States Patent US Patent #9,246,586 - Method and system for enabling and controlling communication typology, access to resources, and document flow in a distributed networking environment", SRI International, Jan 26, 2016
  • Pea, R.D., Mills, M., and Rosen, J.. "United States“Interactive point-of-view authoring of digital video content using a resizable overlay window and a cylindrical layout”", Mar 3, 2015
  • Pea, R.D., Mills, M., Hoffert, E., Rosen, J., and Dauber, K.. "United States Patent US Patent #8,645,832 B2. . “Methods and apparatus for interactive map-based analysis of digital video content.”", Leland Stanford Junior University, Feb 4, 2014
  • Pea, R.D., Mills, M., Hoffert, E., Rosen, J., and Dauber, K.. "United States Patent 8,307,273 B2 “Methods and apparatus for interactive network sharing of digital video content”", Leland Stanford Junior University, Nov 6, 2012
  • Patton, C., Roschelle, J., Pea, R.D., & Vahey, P.. "United States Patent 8,127,039 B2 “Method and system for enabling and controlling communication typology, access to resources, and document flow in a distributed networking environment”", SRI International, Feb 28, 2012
  • Pea, R.D., Mills, M., Rosen, J.. "United States Patent 7,823,058 “Methods and apparatus for interactive point-of-view authoring of digital video content”", Leland Stanford Junior University, Oct 26, 2010
  • Pea, R.D., Mills, M., Hoffert, E., Rosen, J., and Dauber, K.. "United States Patent 7,082,572 B2 “Methods and apparatus for interactive map-based analysis of digital video content”", Leland Stanford Junior University, Jul 25, 2006
  • Pea, R.D., Atkinson, M., Skorski, M., et al.. "United States Patent 6,507,726 “Computer implemented education system”", Teachscape.com, Jan 14, 2003

Research Interests


  • Brain and Learning Sciences
  • Data Sciences
  • Diversity and Identity
  • Leadership and Organization
  • Teachers and Teaching
  • Technology and Education

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


learning sciences focus on advancing theories, research, tools and social practices of technology-enhanced learning of complex domains

2018-19 Courses


Stanford Advisees


  • Doctoral Dissertation Reader (AC)
    Xavier Monroe, Chris Proctor, Soren Rosier
  • Doctoral Dissertation Advisor (AC)
    Richard Davis
  • Master's Program Advisor
    John Mitchel Arcibal, Jenny Han, Joyce He, Kevin Hsu, Andy Jiang, Eszter Meszaros
  • Doctoral (Program)
    Max Bigman, Raquel Coelho, Brandon Reynante, Aditya Vishwanath

All Publications


  • Learning With Media Harnessing Viewpoint and Motion to Generate Fields of Potential Action JOURNAL OF MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY-THEORIES METHODS AND APPLICATIONS Lewis, S., Lindgren, R., Wang, S., Pea, R. D. 2019; 31 (3): 128–36
  • DOI: 10.1159/000496073 The living hand of the past: The role of technology in development Pea, R., Cole, M. 2019; 62 (1-2): 14-39

    View details for DOI 10.1159/000496073

  • Immersive Virtual Reality Field Trips Facilitate Learning About Climate Change FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY Markowitz, D. M., Laha, R., Perone, B. P., Pea, R. D., Bailenson, J. N. 2018; 9
  • Leveraging mobile eye-trackers to capture joint visual attention in co-located collaborative learning groups INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING Schneider, B., Sharma, K., Cuendet, S., Zufferey, G., Dillenbourg, P., Pea, R. 2018; 13 (3): 241–61
  • Learning Analytics in Education INTRODUCTION LEARNING ANALYTICS IN EDUCATION Niemi, D., Pea, R. D., Piety, P., Niemi, D., Pea, R. D., Saxberg, B., Clark, R. E. 2018: XI-XIX
  • UNDERSTANDING LEARNING ANALYTICS ACROSS PRACTICES LEARNING ANALYTICS IN EDUCATION Piety, P. J., Pea, R. D., Niemi, D., Pea, R. D., Saxberg, B., Clark, R. E. 2018: 215–32
  • Immersive Virtual Reality Field Trips Facilitate Learning About Climate Change. Frontiers in psychology Markowitz, D. M., Laha, R., Perone, B. P., Pea, R. D., Bailenson, J. N. 2018; 9: 2364

    Abstract

    Across four studies, two controlled lab experiments and two field studies, we tested the efficacy of immersive Virtual Reality (VR) as an education medium for teaching the consequences of climate change, particularly ocean acidification. Over 270 participants from four different learning settings experienced an immersive underwater world designed to show the process and effects of rising sea water acidity. In all of our investigations, after experiencing immersive VR people demonstrated knowledge gains or inquisitiveness about climate science and in some cases, displayed more positive attitudes toward the environment after comparing pre- and post-test assessments. The analyses also revealed a potential post-hoc mechanism for the learning effects, as the more that people explored the spatial learning environment, the more they demonstrated a change in knowledge about ocean acidification. This work is unique by showing distinct learning gains or an interest in learning across a variety of participants (high school, college students, adults), measures (learning gain scores, tracking data about movement in the virtual world, qualitative responses from classroom teachers), and content (multiple versions varying in length and content about climate change were tested). Our findings explicate the opportunity to use immersive VR for environmental education and to drive information-seeking about important social issues such as climate change.

    View details for PubMedID 30555387

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6284182

  • Using Mobile Eye-Trackers to Unpack the Perceptual Benefits of a Tangible User Interface for Collaborative Learning ACM TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-HUMAN INTERACTION Schneider, B., Sharma, K., Cuendet, S., Zufferey, G., Dillenbourg, P., Pea, R. 2016; 23 (6)

    View details for DOI 10.1145/3012009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000391567900006

  • Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION Grover, S., Pea, R., Cooper, S. 2015; 25 (2): 199–237
  • Toward collaboration sensing INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING Schneider, B., Pea, R. 2014; 9 (4): 371-395
  • Understanding video tools for teaching: Mental models of technology affordances as inhibitors and facilitators of lesson planning in history and language arts STUDIES IN EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION Krauskopf, K., Zahn, C., Hesse, F. W., Pea, R. D. 2014; 43: 230-243
  • Mobile Learning CAMBRIDGE HANDBOOK OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES, 2ND EDITION Sharples, M., Pea, R., Sawyer, R. K. 2014: 501–21
  • Real-time mutual gaze perception enhances collaborative learning and collaboration quality INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING Schneider, B., Pea, R. 2013; 8 (4): 375-397
  • Preparing for Future Learning with a Tangible User Interface: The Case of Neuroscience IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES Schneider, B., Wallace, J., Blikstein, P., Pea, R. 2013; 6 (2): 117-129
  • Computational Thinking in K-12: A Review of the State of the Field EDUCATIONAL RESEARCHER Grover, S., Pea, R. 2013; 42 (1): 38-43
  • How to improve collaborative learning with video tools in the classroom? Social vs. cognitive guidance for student teams INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING Zahn, C., Krauskopf, K., Hesse, F. W., Pea, R. 2012; 7 (2): 259-284
  • Media Use, Face-to-Face Communication, Media Multitasking, and Social Well-Being Among 8- to 12-Year-Old Girls DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Pea, R., Nass, C., Meheula, L., Rance, M., Kumar, A., Bamford, H., Nass, M., Simha, A., Stillerman, B., Yang, S., Zhou, M. 2012; 48 (2): 327-336

    Abstract

    An online survey of 3,461 North American girls ages 8-12 conducted in the summer of 2010 through Discovery Girls magazine examined the relationships between social well-being and young girls' media use--including video, video games, music listening, reading/homework, e-mailing/posting on social media sites, texting/instant messaging, and talking on phones/video chatting--and face-to-face communication. This study introduced both a more granular measure of media multitasking and a new comparative measure of media use versus time spent in face-to-face communication. Regression analyses indicated that negative social well-being was positively associated with levels of uses of media that are centrally about interpersonal interaction (e.g., phone, online communication) as well as uses of media that are not (e.g., video, music, and reading). Video use was particularly strongly associated with negative social well-being indicators. Media multitasking was also associated with negative social indicators. Conversely, face-to-face communication was strongly associated with positive social well-being. Cell phone ownership and having a television or computer in one's room had little direct association with children's socioemotional well-being. We hypothesize possible causes for these relationships, call for research designs to address causality, and outline possible implications of such findings for the social well-being of younger adolescents.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0027030

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300961400004

    View details for PubMedID 22268607

  • Distributed by Design: On the Promises and Pitfalls of Collaborative Learning with Multiple Representations JOURNAL OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES White, T., Pea, R. 2011; 20 (3): 489-547
  • Beyond participation to co-creation of meaning: mobile social media in generative learning communities SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION SUR LES SCIENCES SOCIALES Lewis, S., Pea, R., Rosen, J. 2010; 49 (3): 351-369
  • Conducting Video Research in the Learning Sciences: Guidance on Selection, Analysis, Technology, and Ethics JOURNAL OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES Derry, S. J., Pea, R. D., Barron, B., Engle, R. A., Erickson, F., Goldman, R., Hall, R., Koschmann, T., Lemke, J. L., Sherin, M. G., Sherin, B. L. 2010; 19 (1): 3-53
  • Comparing Simple and Advanced Video Tools as Supports for Complex Collaborative Design Processes JOURNAL OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES Zahn, C., Pea, R., Hesse, F. W., Rosen, J. 2010; 19 (3): 403-440
  • Video Collaboratories for Research and Education: An Analysis of Collaboration Design Patterns IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES Pea, R., Lindgren, R. 2008; 1 (4): 235-247

    View details for DOI 10.1109/TLT.2009.5

    View details for Web of Science ID 000207847700005

  • Cognitive technologies for establishing, sharing and comparing perspectives on video over computer networks SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION SUR LES SCIENCES SOCIALES Pea, R., Lindgren, R., Rosen, J. 2008; 47 (3): 353-370
  • Video-as-Data and Digital Video Manipulation Techniques for Transforming Learning Sciences Research, Education, and Other Cultural Practices INTERNATIONAL HANDBOOK OF VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS, VOL I Pea, R. D., Weiss, J., Nolan, J., Hunsinger, J., Trifonas, P. 2006: 1321–93
  • The diver project: Interactive digital video repurposing IEEE MULTIMEDIA Pea, R., Mills, M., ROSEN, J., Dauber, K., Effelsberg, W., Hoffert, E. 2004; 11 (1): 54-61
  • The social and technological dimensions of scaffolding and related theoretical concepts for learning, education, and human activity JOURNAL OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES Pea, R. D. 2004; 13 (3): 423-451
  • Changing how and what children learn in school with computer-based technologies FUTURE OF CHILDREN Roschelle, J. M., PEA, R. D., Hoadley, C. M., GORDIN, D. N., Means, B. M. 2000; 10 (2): 76-101

    Abstract

    Schools today face ever-increasing demands in their attempts to ensure that students are well equipped to enter the workforce and navigate a complex world. Research indicates that computer technology can help support learning, and that it is especially useful in developing the higher-order skills of critical thinking, analysis, and scientific inquiry. But the mere presence of computers in the classroom does not ensure their effective use. Some computer applications have been shown to be more successful than others, and many factors influence how well even the most promising applications are implemented. This article explores the various ways computer technology can be used to improve how and what children learn in the classroom. Several examples of computer-based applications are highlighted to illustrate ways technology can enhance how children learn by supporting four fundamental characteristics of learning: (1) active engagement, (2) participation in groups, (3) frequent interaction and feedback, and (4) connections to real-world contexts. Additional examples illustrate ways technology can expand what children learn by helping them to understand core concepts in subjects like math, science, and literacy. Research indicates, however, that the use of technology as an effective learning tool is more likely to take place when embedded in a broader education reform movement that includes improvements in teacher training, curriculum, student assessment, and a school's capacity for change. To help inform decisions about the future role of computers in the classroom, the authors conclude that further research is needed to identify the uses that most effectively support learning and the conditions required for successful implementation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168134300006

    View details for PubMedID 11255710

  • Toward a learning technologies knowledge network ETR&D-EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PEA, R. D., Tinker, R., Linn, M., Means, B., Bransford, J., Roschelle, J., Hsi, S., Brophy, S., Songer, N. 1999; 47 (2): 19-38
  • Addressing the challenges of inquiry-based learning through technology and curriculum design JOURNAL OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES Edelson, D. C., GORDIN, D. N., PEA, R. D. 1999; 8 (3-4): 391-450
  • The collaboratory notebook COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM Edelson, D. C., PEA, R. D., Gomez, L. M. 1996; 39 (4): 32-33
  • Prospects for scientific visualization as an educational technology JOURNAL OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES GORDIN, D. N., PEA, R. D. 1995; 4 (3): 249-?
  • LEARNING SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS THROUGH MATERIAL AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES - CONVERSATIONAL ANALYSIS MEETS CONCEPTUAL CHANGE EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGIST PEA, R. D. 1993; 28 (3): 265-277
  • THE COLLABORATIVE VISUALIZATION PROJECT COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM PEA, R. D. 1993; 36 (5): 60-63
  • LEARNING THROUGH MULTIMEDIA IEEE COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND APPLICATIONS PEA, R. D. 1991; 11 (4): 58-66
  • TOOLS FOR BRIDGING THE CULTURES OF EVERYDAY AND SCIENTIFIC THINKING JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING Hawkins, J., PEA, R. D. 1987; 24 (4): 291-307
  • COGNITIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR WRITING REVIEW OF RESEARCH IN EDUCATION PEA, R. D., KURLAND, D. M. 1987; 14: 277-326
  • Beyond Amplification: Using the Computer to Reorganize Mental Functioning EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGIST Pea, R. D. 1985; 20 (4): 167–82
  • ORIGINS OF VERBAL LOGIC - SPONTANEOUS DENIALS BY 2-YEAR AND 3-YEAR OLDS JOURNAL OF CHILD LANGUAGE PEA, R. D. 1982; 9 (3): 597-626

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982PP76600005

    View details for PubMedID 7174759

  • LOGIC IN EARLY CHILD LANGUAGE ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES PEA, R. D. 1980; 345 (JUN): 27-43
  • Constantly connected: At what price and with what rewards? Mark, G., Dey, A., Czerwinski, M., Pang, A., Bell, G., Mazmanian, M., Pea, R., ACM ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY. 2016: 204–9
  • Digital Video Tools in the Classroom: How to Support Meaningful Collaboration and Critical Advanced Thinking of Students? NEW SCIENCE OF LEARNING: COGNITION, COMPUTERS AND COLLABORATION IN EDUCATION Zahn, C., Krauskopf, K., Hesse, F. W., Pea, R., Khine, M. S., Saleh, I. M. 2010: 503–23
  • Faculty Development to Change the Paradigm of Communication Skills Teaching in Oncology JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Back, A. L., Arnold, R. M., Baile, W. F., Tulsky, J. A., Barley, G. E., Pea, R. D., Fryer-Edwards, K. A. 2009; 27 (7): 1137-1141

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2008.20.2408

    View details for Web of Science ID 000266193500022

    View details for PubMedID 19171703

  • Mathematics Worth Knowing, Resources Worth Growing, Research Worth Noting: A Response to the National Mathematics Advisory Panel Report EDUCATIONAL RESEARCHER Roschelle, J., Singleton, C., Sabelli, N., Pea, R., Bransford, J. D. 2008; 37 (9): 610-617
  • Fostering learning in the networked world: The cyberlearning opportunity and challenge. A 21st century agenda for the National Science Foundation Report of the NSF Task Force on Cyberlearning Borgman, C. L., Abelson, H., Dirks, L., Johnson, R., Koedinger, K. R., Linn, M. C., Lynch, C. A., Oblinger, D. G., Pea, R. D., Salen, K. 2008
  • WILD for Learning Interacting Through New Computing Devices Anytime, Anywhere CAMBRIDGE HANDBOOK OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES Pea, R. D., Maldonado, H., Sawyer, R. K. 2006: 427–41
  • Video-as-data and digital video manipulation techniques for transforming learning sciences research, education, and other cultural practices The international handbook of virtual learning environments Pea, R. D. Springer. 2006: 1321–1393
  • Foundations and Opportunities for an Interdisciplinary Science of Learning CAMBRIDGE HANDBOOK OF THE LEARNING SCIENCES Bransford, J. D., Barron, B., Pea, R. D., Meltzoff, A., Kuhl, P., Bell, P., Stevens, R., Schwartz, D. L., Vye, N., Reeves, B., Roschelle, J., Sabelli, N. H., Sawyer, R. K. 2006: 19–34
  • Advanced digital video technologies to support collaborative learning in school education and beyond International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Zahn, C., Hesse, F., Finke, M., Pea, R., Mills, M., Rosen, J. LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOC PUBL. 2005: 737–742
  • Emerging social engineering in the wireless classroom 6th International Conference of the Learning Sciences Goldman, S., Pea, R., Maldonado, H. LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOC PUBL. 2004: 222–229
  • Learning science through collaborative visualization over the Internet Nobel Symposium: Virtual museums and public understanding of science and culture, May 26-29, 2002 Pea, R. 2002
  • A walk on the WILD side: How wireless handhelds may change computer-supported collaborative learning International Journal of Cognition and Technology Roschelle, J., Pea, R. 2002; 1 (1): 145-168
  • How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school: Expanded edition Council, N. R. National Academies Press. 2000
  • THE COLLABORATIVE VISUALIZATION PROJECT - SHARED-TECHNOLOGY LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR SCIENCE LEARNING PEA, R. D., GOMEZ, L. M., Maitan, J. SPIE - INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING. 1993: 253–64

    View details for DOI 10.1117/12.139268

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993BX53X00026

  • COMPUTERS AND EXCELLENCE IN THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES PEA, R. D. 1987; 517: 125-138
  • THE LIKELIHOOD OF CORRELATIONAL THINKING IN ADULTS - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY AND METHODOLOGICAL CRITIQUE GENETIC SOCIAL AND GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY MONOGRAPHS McLaughlin, J. A., PEA, R. D. 1987; 113 (4): 463-485
  • USER CENTERED SYSTEM-DESIGN - NEW PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - NORMAN,DA, DRAPER,SW (Book Review) JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL COMPUTING RESEARCH Book Review Authored by: PEA, R. 1987; 3 (1): 129–34
  • MERDS THAT LAUGH DONT LIKE MUSHROOMS - EVIDENCE FOR DEDUCTIVE REASONING BY PRESCHOOLERS DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY HAWKINS, J., PEA, R. D., GLICK, J., SCRIBNER, S. 1984; 20 (4): 584–94
  • CAN INFORMATION-THEORY EXPLAIN EARLY WORD CHOICE JOURNAL OF CHILD LANGUAGE PEA, R. D. 1979; 6 (3): 397-410

    View details for Web of Science ID A1979HS58000001

    View details for PubMedID 536407