Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine (2003)
  • Diplomate, American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (2005)

Professional Education


  • DVM, Univeristy of Wisconsin, Veterinary Medicine (1993)
  • MPH, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Public Health (2003)

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


His research interests include infectious diseases, particularly zoonoses, and exploring techniques which promote the health and welfare of laboratory animals.

2013-14 Courses


Journal Articles


  • Antinociceptive Effects of Sustained-Release Buprenorphine in a Model of Incisional Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus). Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Chum, H. H., Jampachairsri, K., McKeon, G. P., Yeomans, D. C., Pacharinsak, C., Felt, S. A. 2014; 53 (2): 193-197

    Abstract

    Effective management of postoperative pain is an essential component of the care and welfare of laboratory animals. A sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine (Bup-SR) has recently been introduced to the veterinary market and has been reported to provide analgesia for as long as 72 h. Using evoked mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity tests, we here evaluated the antinociceptive effects of Bup-SR in a model of incisional pain in rats. Paw withdrawal responses were obtained before and 1 through 4 d after surgery. Rats are assigned to receive Bup-SR (0.3, 1.2, or 4.5 mg/kg SC once) or buprenorphine HCl (Bup HCl, 0.05 mg/kg SC twice daily for 3 d). Responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli in the 1.2 and 4.5 Bup-SR groups did not differ from those of rats in the Bup HCl group. Thermal latency on day 3 in rats that received 0.3 mg/kg Bup-SR was significantly different from baseline, indicating that this dose effectively decreased thermal hypersensitivity for at least 48 h. Marked sedation occurred in rats in the 4.5 Bup-SR group. Our findings indicate that Bup-SR at 0.3 or 1.2 mg/kg SC is effective in minimizing hypersensitivity with minimal sedation for at least 48 h (thermal hypersensitivity) and 72 h, respectively, in the incisional pain model in rats.

    View details for PubMedID 24602547

  • Tissue Distribution of Enrofloxacin in African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis) after Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Administration JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE Felt, S., Papich, M. G., Howard, A., Long, T., McKeon, G., Torreilles, S., Green, S. 2013; 52 (2): 186-188

    Abstract

    As part of an enrofloxacin pharmacokinetic study, concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (metabolite) were measured in various tissues (brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, and spleen) collected from treated (subcutaneous delivery, n = 3; intramuscular delivery, n = 3; untreated controls, n = 2) adult female Xenopus laevis by using HPLC. Enrofloxacin was rapidly absorbed after administration by either route and readily diffused into all sampled tissues. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were present in the tissue samples collected at 8 h. The highest average tissue concentrations for enrofloxacin were found in kidney, with the lowest concentrations in liver. Ciprofloxacin tissue concentrations paralleled but were always lower than those of enrofloxacin for all time points and tissues except brain and kidney. These results, together with previously published pharmacokinetic data and known minimal inhibitory concentrations of common pathogenic bacteria, provide a strong evidence-based rationale for choosing enrofloxacin to treat infectious diseases in X. laevis.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000316159700010

    View details for PubMedID 23562103

  • Biology, behavior, and environmental enrichment for the captive African clawed frog (Xenopus spp) APPLIED ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR SCIENCE Chum, H., Felt, S., Garner, J., Green, S. 2013; 143 (2-4): 150-156
  • Maternal antibodies or nonproductive infections confound the need for rederivation. Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Nagamine, C. M., Chen, L., Ho, W. Q., Felt, S. A. 2013; 52 (4): 495-498

    Abstract

    After rederivation of a mouse parvovirus (MPV)-contaminated transgenic mouse strain, serology and PCR testing of the surrogate dam showed it to be infected with mouse parvovirus strain 1 (MPV-1). The rederived pups (n = 3) also were MPVpositive, according to serology. Despite MPV seropositivity, fecal PCR tests of the pups were negative, as were serologic results from direct-contact sentinels. Only one rederived pup survived, and this male was bred successfully. None of its mates or progeny seroconverted to MPV. At 14.5 mo of age, the rederived male mouse was euthanized; tissues were collected and submitted for MPV testing; both serologic tests and PCR analysis of mesenteric lymph nodes were MPV-negative. One explanation for the rederived pups' MPV seropostivity is passive transfer of maternal antibodies or a nonproductive MPV infection. This case illustrates that although routine serological testing of surrogate mothers and pups is appropriate, any positive results should be further investigated by using transmissibility testing (fecal PCR or contact sentinels or both) prior to repeat rederivation.

    View details for PubMedID 23849450

  • Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Xenopus Collected in Africa (1871-2000) and in California (2001-2010). PloS one Vredenburg, V. T., Felt, S. A., Morgan, E. C., McNally, S. V., Wilson, S., Green, S. L. 2013; 8 (5)

    Abstract

    International trade of the invasive South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), a subclinical carrier of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatis (Bd) has been proposed as a major means of introduction of Bd into naïve, susceptible amphibian populations. The historical presence of Bd in the indigenous African population of Xenopus is well documented. However, there are no reports documenting the presence of Bd in wild Xenopus populations in the US, particularly in California where introduced populations are well-established after intentional or accidental release. In this report, a survey was conducted on 178 archived specimens of 6 species of Xenopus collected in Africa from 1871-2000 and on 23 archived specimens (all wild-caught Xenopus laevis) collected in California, USA between 2001 and 2010. The overall prevalence rate of Bd in the tested Xenopus was 2.8%. The earliest positive specimen was X. borealis collected in Kenya in 1934. The overall prevalence of Bd in the X. laevis collected in California was 13% with 2 positive specimens from 2001 and one positive specimen from 2003. The positive Xenopus (3/23) collected in California were collected in 2001 (2/3) and 2003 (1/3). These data document the presence of Bd-infected wild Xenopus laevis in California. The findings reported here support the prevailing hypothesis that Bd was present as a stable, endemic infection in Xenopus populations in Africa prior to their worldwide distribution likely via international live-amphibian trade.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0063791

    View details for PubMedID 23691097

  • Effect of intra-tonsillar injection of Steroids on the palatine tonsils of rabbits. Laryngoscope Cho, D., Sinha, S. R., et al 2013
  • Mortality and Morbidity in African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis) Associated with Construction Noise and Vibrations JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE Felt, S. A., Cowan, A. M., Luong, R., Green, S. L. 2012; 51 (2): 253-256

    Abstract

    In Spring 2008, 175 adult female Xenopus laevis were exposed to construction-related vibrations that caused overt water rippling in the frog tanks. The 3 affected tanks were custom-built static, 300-gal 'pond-style' tanks that sat on the floor of the housing room. The water in the tank developed visible ripples as a result of the vibrations transmitted through the floor during jack-hammering in an adjacent room that was approximately 10 ftaway. All frogs in the tanks displayed buoyancy problems, excessive air gulping, and skin sloughing; ultimately 7 frogs died. In addition, these 7 animals were bloated, and 5 of these 7 had regurgitated and everted their stomach and distal esophagus into the oral cavity, resulting in airway obstruction and death. Gross pathologic findings included regurgitation and eversion of the stomach of the distal portion of the esophagus into the oral cavity, obstruction of the airway, and lung overinflation. No significant histologic lesions were observed. Construction vibrations transmitted through the water appeared to have disrupted the mechanoreceptive function of the lateral line system, resulting in overstimulation of the noxious feeding response, regurgitation, and eversion of the stomach and distal esophagus into the oral cavity and subsequent suffocation due to airway obstruction. After immediate cessation of the jack-hammering and relocation of the remaining frogs, no additional morbidities or mortalities occurred.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306772200016

    View details for PubMedID 22776127

  • Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Levels in Disposable Individually Ventilated Cages after Removal from Mechanical Ventilation JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE Nagamine, C. M., Long, C. T., McKeon, G. P., Felt, S. A. 2012; 51 (2): 155-161

    Abstract

    Disposable individually ventilated cages have lids that restrict air exchange when the cage is not mechanically ventilated. This design feature may cause intracage CO2 to increase and O2 to decrease (hypercapnic and hypoxic conditions, respectively) when the electrical supply to the ventilated rack fails, the ventilated rack malfunctions, cages are docked in the rack incorrectly, or cages are removed from the ventilated rack for extended periods of time. We investigated how quickly hypercapnic and hypoxic conditions developed within disposable individually ventilated cages after removal from mechanical ventilation and compared the data with nondisposable static cages, disposable static cages, and unventilated nondisposable individually ventilated cages. When disposable individually ventilated cages with 5 adult mice per cage were removed from mechanical ventilation, CO2 concentrations increased from less than 1% at 0 h to approximately 5% at 3 h and O2 levels dropped from more than 20% at 0 h to 11.7% at 6 h. The breathing pattern of the mice showed a prominent abdominal component (hyperventilation). Changes were similar for 4 adult mice per cage, reaching at least 5% CO2 at 4 h and 13.0% O2 at 6 h. For 3 or 2 mice per cage, values were 4.6% CO2 and 14.7% O2 and 3.04% CO2 and 17.1% O2, respectively, at 6 h. These results document that within disposable individually ventilated cages, a hypercapnic and hypoxic microenvironment develops within hours in the absence of mechanical ventilation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306772200003

    View details for PubMedID 22776114

  • Serum Clinical Biochemical and Hematologic Reference Ranges of Laboratory-Reared and Wild-Caught Xenopus laevis JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE Wilson, S., Felt, S., Torreilles, S., Howard, A., Behan, C., Moorhead, R., Green, S. 2011; 50 (5): 635-640

    Abstract

    The South African clawed frogs Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis are fully aquatic amphibians and well-established animal models. Because genetically engineered laboratory Xenopus are now being produced, the establishment of normal reference ranges for serum biochemical and hematologic parameters is essential for phenotyping and as a diagnostic aide. We determined normal reference ranges for hematologic values from 3 populations of X. laevis: wild-caught frogs (n = 43) and frogs from 2 commercial sources (A, n = 166; B, n = 109). For serum biochemistry, we determined normal reference ranges for frogs from source A and wild-caught frogs divided by sex and season. Significant differences across populations were found in WBC and RBC counts, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume. Among serum biochemical analytes, significant differences were found for albumin:globulin ratio, anion gap, and concentrations of albumin, globulin, total protein, lipase, alanine transaminase, ?-glutamyl transpeptidase; creatine phosphokinase; indirect, direct, and total bilirubin; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein lipase, carbon dioxide, glucose, lactacte dehydrogenase, calcium, chloride, and sodium. We hypothesize that these differences can be attributed to differences in water quality, habitat, ambient temperature, diet, sex, recent transport or shipment, and genetic background. However, testing that hypothesis is beyond the scope of the current study. In addition, clinical chemistry and hematologic reference range values Xenopus laevis are quite distinct from those for other species and are most consistent with the only values published for another fully aquatic amphibian, the Eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis).

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296070000004

    View details for PubMedID 22330708

  • A far-reaching career LAB ANIMAL Felt, S. A. 2011; 40 (5): 162-163

    Abstract

    An interview with Stephen A. Felt, DVM, MPH, DACLAM, DACVPM, Attending Veterinarian, Assistant Professor, Department of Comparative Medicine, Associate Director, Veterinary Service Center, Director, Laboratory Animal Medicine Residency Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289998600018

    View details for PubMedID 21508955

  • Comparison of rectal and tympanic core body temperature measurement in adult Guyanese squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus sciureus) JOURNAL OF MEDICAL PRIMATOLOGY Long, C. T., Pacharinsak, C., Jampachaisri, K., McKeon, G. P., Howard, A. M., Albertelli, M. A., Felt, S. A. 2011; 40 (2): 135-141

    Abstract

    Measuring core body temperature in a manner that is safe for animals and veterinary personnel is an important part of a physical examination. For nonhuman primates, this can involve increased restraint, additional stress, as well as the use of anesthetics and their deleterious effects on body temperature measurements. The purpose of this study was to compare two non-invasive methods of infrared tympanic thermometry to standard rectal thermometry in adult squirrel monkeys.Tympanic temperatures were collected from 37 squirrel monkeys and compared to rectal temperatures using a human and veterinary infrared tympanic thermometer.Compared with rectal temperature measurements, the human tympanic thermometer readings were not significantly different, while the veterinary tympanic thermometer measurements were significantly higher (P<0.05). There were no differences between sexes.The tympanic thermometer designed for use in humans can be used in adult squirrel monkeys as an alternative to rectal thermometry for assessing core body temperature.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0684.2010.00449.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287965500009

    View details for PubMedID 20946145

  • Cross-Species Surveillance of Leptospira in Domestic and Pen-Domestic Animals in Mahalla City, Gharbeya Governorate, Egypt AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE Felt, S. A., Wasfy, M. O., El-Tras, W. F., Samir, A., Rahaman, B. A., Boshra, M., Parker, T. M., Hatem, M. E., El-Bassiouny, A. A., Murray, C. K., Pimentel, G. 2011; 84 (3): 420-425

    Abstract

    A survey of 179 animals (black rats, dogs, sheep, buffaloes, cattle, donkeys, weasels, and cats) for Leptospira infection was conducted in Mahalla City (Lower Egypt). Blood, urine, and kidney were collected and tested by culture, microscopic agglutination test (MAT), and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among rats, 26% were positive by PCR, including 7% that were also positive by culture for L. interrogans serovars Grippotyphosa, Pyrogenes, and Icterohaemorrhagiae. L. borpetersenii serovar Polonica was isolated for the first time in Egypt in three rats. MAT titers ? 1:800 were observed in 11% of rats and 12% of dogs. L. interrogans serovar Grippotyphosa was detected in one cat. Sheep and donkeys were negative for leptospirosis by all methods. Buffaloes and cattle were seropositive in 20% and 44% of animals, respectively. Data indicate that several pathogenic serovars are circulating in the animals, which may pose exposure risks and account for high rates of acute febrile illness.

    View details for DOI 10.4269/ajtmh.2011.10-0393

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287995600011

    View details for PubMedID 21363980

  • Analgesic Effects of Tramadol, Tramadol-Gabapentin, and Buprenorphine in an Incisional Model of Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus) Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science McKeon, G., Pacharinsak, Cholawat; Long, Charles T.; Howard, Antwain M.; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Yeomans, David C; Felt, Stephen A. 2011; 50 (2): 192-197
  • EFFECTS OF RAINFALL, HOST DEMOGRAPHY, AND MUSTH ON STRONGYLE FECAL EGG COUNTS IN AFRICAN ELEPHANTS (LOXODONTA AFRICANA) IN NAMIBIA JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE DISEASES Thurber, M. I., O'Connell-Rodwell, C. E., Turner, W. C., Nambandi, K., KINZLEY, C., Rodwel, T. C., Faulkner, C. T., Felt, S. A., Bouley, D. M. 2011; 47 (1): 172-181

    Abstract

    Wild African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are commonly infected with intestinal strongyle parasites. Our objective was to determine baseline fecal strongyle egg counts for elephants in the northeast region of Etosha National Park, Namibia and determine if these numbers were affected by annual rainfall, elephant demography (age of individuals and composition of groups), and hormonal state of males. We found that matriarchal family group members have significantly higher fecal egg counts than male elephants (bulls). Among family group members, strongyle egg counts increased with age, whereas among bulls, strongyle egg counts decreased with age. Years of higher rainfall were correlated with decreased numbers of strongyle eggs among bulls. Finally, bulls were not affected by their physiologic (hormonal) status (musth vs. nonmusth). These results suggest that infection by strongyle parasites in Namibian African elephants is a dynamic process affected by intrinsic and extrinsic factors including host demography and rainfall.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287280200016

    View details for PubMedID 21270006

  • The Pharmacokinetics of Enrofloxacin in Adult African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis) JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE Howard, A. M., Papich, M. G., Felt, S. A., Long, C. T., McKeon, G. P., Bond, E. S., Torreilles, S. L., Luong, R. H., Green, S. L. 2010; 49 (6): 800-804

    Abstract

    Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was determined in adult female Xenopus laevis after single-dose administration (10 mg/kg) by intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. Frogs were evaluated at various time points until 8 h after injection. Plasma was analyzed for antibiotic concentration levels by HPLC. We computed pharmacokinetic parameters by using noncompartmental analysis of the pooled concentrations (naive pooled samples). After intramuscular administration of enrofloxacin, the half-life was 5.32 h, concentration maximum was 10.85 ?g/mL, distribution volume was 841.96 mL/kg, and area under the time-concentration curve was 57.59 ?g×h/mL; after subcutaneous administration these parameters were 4.08 h, 9.76 ?g/mL, 915.85 mL/kg, and 47.42 ?g×h/mL, respectively. According to plasma pharmacokinetics, Xenopus seem to metabolize enrofloxacin in a manner similar to mammals: low levels of the enrofloxacin metabolite, ciprofloxacin, were detected in the frogs' habitat water and plasma. At necropsy, there were no gross or histologic signs of toxicity after single-dose administration; toxicity was not evaluated for repeated dosing. The plasma concentrations reached levels considered effective against common aquatic pathogens and suggest that a single, once-daily dose would be a reasonable regimen to consider when treating sick frogs. The treatment of sick frogs should be based on specific microbiologic identification of the pathogen and on antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284791700002

    View details for PubMedID 21205443

  • A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine PLOS PATHOGENS Nielsen, A. T., Dolganov, N. A., Rasmussen, T., Otto, G., Miller, M. C., Felt, S. A., Torreilles, S., Schoolnik, G. K. 2010; 6 (9)

    Abstract

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could generate a subpopulation of V. cholerae that continues to produce TCP and CT in the rice water stools of cholera patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001102

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282373000024

    View details for PubMedID 20862321

  • COMPARISON OF GASTROGRAFIN TO BARIUM SULFATE AS A GASTROINTESTINAL CONTRAST AGENT IN RED-EARED SLIDER TURTLES (TRACHEMYS SCRIPTA ELEGANS) VETERINARY RADIOLOGY & ULTRASOUND Long, C. T., Page, R. B., Howard, A. M., McKeon, G. P., Felt, S. A. 2010; 51 (1): 42-47

    Abstract

    Red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) commonly develop intestinal obstruction. The gastrointestinal transit time in turtles tends to be longer than in other animals, making a rapid diagnosis of obstruction difficult. Fifteen red-eared sliders were given either Gastrografin or 30% w/v barium sulfate orally to compare ease of administration, transit time, and image quality. Each contrast medium was easy to administer but barium sulfate had to be administered more slowly (mean = 40s) than Gastrografin (mean = 20s) to prevent regurgitation. The mean transit and emptying time of Gastrografin was at least 9 h faster than barium sulfate at all time points except gastric transit. Both contrast media had a smooth, uniform appearance that outlined the mucosa with well-defined margins within the stomach and proximal small intestine. Dilution of Gastrografin occurred as it progressed through the intestines, resulting in decreased opacity in the distal small intestine and colon. Pre-administration packed cell volume and total serum protein levels of four turtles receiving Gastrografin were compared with levels at 24-, 96-, and 168-hours postadministration as well as to four control turtles not receiving contrast medium. Packed cell volume and total serum protein levels did not significantly differ among the Gastrografin and control group. From a clinical perspective, administration of Gastrografin allows for quicker results with only minor hematologic changes in red-eared sliders, but visualization of this contrast medium in the lower gastrointestinal tract may be insufficient for an accurate diagnosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1740-8261.2009.01619.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273372200007

    View details for PubMedID 20166392

  • ACARIASIS IN CAPTIVE FAT-TAILED JIRDS (PACHYUROMYS DUPRASI) JOURNAL OF ZOO AND WILDLIFE MEDICINE Felt, S. A. 2009; 40 (1): 217-219

    Abstract

    This case report describes acariasis in captive, wild-caught, fat-tailed jirds (Pachyuromys duprasi). All animals within the cage (n = 4) were examined for pruritus and alopecia and subsequently found to be infested with the mite Pyroglyphis morgan ii. All life stages of the mite were identified on animals and within the nesting materials. Treatment, including repeated subcutaneous ivermectin administration and husbandry practice modifications, proved effective in eradicating the mites and in subsequent amelioration of clinical signs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000264775800035

    View details for PubMedID 19368268

  • An Effective Venipuncture Technique and Normal Serum Biochemistry Parameters of the Captive Fat-Tailed Jird (Pachyuromys duprasi) JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE Felt, S. A., Guirguis, F. I., Wasfy, M. O., Howard, J. S., Domingo, N. V., Hussein, I. H. 2009; 48 (1): 57-60

    Abstract

    Thirty-nine captively reared fat-tailed jirds (Pachyuromys duprasi) were enrolled in a minimally invasive study to determine an effective venipuncture technique and establish normal serum biochemistry parameters. A jugular venipuncture technique using chemical restraint (ketamine, 30 mg/kg; xylazine, 6 mg/kg; acepromazine, 1 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally was safe and consistently yielded at least 0.3 mL of blood. Of the biochemical indicators measured (glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, alkaline phosphatase, alanine transferase, total bilirubin, amylase, BUN, creatinine, calcium, phosphorous, sodium and potassium), amylase and glucose levels differed significantly between male and female fat-tailed jirds.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000263137800010

    View details for PubMedID 19245752

  • Tacrolimus Ointment: An Effective Topical Treatment of Localized Atopic Dermatitis in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) JAALAS Torreilles SL, Luong RH, Felt SA, McClure DE 2009; 48 (3): 307-311
  • Biology, breeding, husbandry and diseases of the captive Egyptian fat-tailed jird (Pachyuromys duprasi natronensis) LAB ANIMAL Felt, S. A., Hussein, H. I., Helmy, I. M. 2008; 37 (6): 256-261

    Abstract

    The fat-tailed jird, a small North African rodent with a distinctive club-shaped tail, is a convenient research subject and an emerging model for Old World leishmaniasis. The authors present the natural history and biology of the Egyptian fat-tailed jird and provide guidelines for the breeding and husbandry of this species on the basis of their experience raising a colony from wild stock in Cairo, Egypt. They also discuss the diseases they encountered in wild and captive-bred jirds.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000256765800008

    View details for PubMedID 18496544

  • Biology, breeding, husbandry and diseases of the captive Egyptian fat-tailed jird (Pachyuromys duprasi natronensis) Lab Animal Felt SA, HI Hussein, IH Helmy 2008; 37 (6): 256-261
  • A Multispecies Disease Outbreak of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Grd Jotyar, Iraq Libyan Journal of Infectious Diseases Felt SA, Saad MD, Yingst SL 2008; 1: 43-49
  • Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the Volta District of Ghana: an Uncertain Reservoir for Focal Disease Outbreak Libyan Journal of Infectious Diseases Raczniak G, Villinski JT, Puplampu N, Mechta S, Klena JD, Felt S, Abbassy M, Hanafi H, Hoel DF, Wilson M, Boakye 2008; 1: 50-59
  • Qinghai-like H5N1 from Domestic Cats, Northern Iraq EID Yingst SL, Saad MD, Felt SA 2006; 12 (8)
  • A comparison of non-contact, subcutaneous, and rectal temperatures in captive owl monkeys (Aotus sp.) J Med Primatol Shelton LJ, White CE, Felt SA 2006; 5: 346-351
  • Evaluation of a timed and repeated perianal tape test for the detection of pinworms (Trypanoxyuris microon) in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae) J Med Primatol Felt SA, White CE. 2005; 34 (4): 209-214

Conference Proceedings


  • Analgesic Effects of Sustained Release Buprenorphine in an Incisional Model of Hyperalgesia in Rats (Rattus norvegicus) Chum, H., McKeon, G., Yeomans, D. C., Jampachaisri, K., Pacharinsak, C., Felt, S. AMER ASSOC LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE. 2012: 692-692